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-Get out PINK SHEET labeled “The Tragedy of Macbeth 1.7.1-28” -(it has Macbeth’s soliloquy which begins “If it were done”) -With a partner, TRANSLATE this.

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Presentation on theme: "-Get out PINK SHEET labeled “The Tragedy of Macbeth 1.7.1-28” -(it has Macbeth’s soliloquy which begins “If it were done”) -With a partner, TRANSLATE this."— Presentation transcript:

1 -Get out PINK SHEET labeled “The Tragedy of Macbeth ” -(it has Macbeth’s soliloquy which begins “If it were done”) -With a partner, TRANSLATE this passage into modern language! (Use the book—pg 337 to help you. USE YOUR BRAIN, NOT SPARKNOTES!) 1 BELLWORK!

2 2 Thursday, September 25 th What am I learning today? Language – Learning Goal: Demonstrate the correct use of vocabulary and grammar in my writing. (ELACC12L1-6) Reading – Learning Goal: The Tragedy of Macbeth: Analyze the behaviors and values of the Elizabethan time period. Identify evidence of literary techniques and structures to interpret the literature. Evaluate the community of Elizabethan England and compare/contrast with the Anglo- Saxon and Medieval communities. Analyze the historical connection to King James. Provide textual evidence for Macbeth as a tragic hero. (ELACC12RL1; ELACC12RL2; ELACC12RL3; ELACC12RL4; ELACC12RL5; ELACC12RL6) What am I going to do today? Bellwork: translating Macbeth Notes from Act I Continue reading/analyzing The Tragedy of Macbeth (Act 2)– assign parts (extra credit) What will I do to show I learned it? Vocabulary – Compose higher level sentences using vocabulary from units 4 and 5 connecting with novel for research Gather textual evidence for Macbeth as tragic hero, motifs and imagery as we read (quadrants) Summative assessment: Partner test of textual analysis with an informational text.

3 Tragic Hero -noble – better than we are -suffers a reversal of fortune -recognizes consequence of actions -audience who sees these actions and consequences is moved by pity and fear

4 Concept of Order Elizabethans believed in this concept of order.... “They believed that a great chain linked all beings, from God on high to the lowest beasts and plants”(322). They believed that “the sun ruled in the heavens...the king ruled in the state and the father in the family” (322). If ONE area is disturbed, then this would cause disorder... “a tragic hero’s bad choices can disturb the whole universe” (322).

5 Parallel Disorders Watch for disorder in.... -the mind of Macbeth (tragic hero) -the weather -the kingdom

6 -paradox – a situation created that can’t possibly exist because different elements cancel each other out; seems contradictory, but on closer examination, it doesn’t. “Fair is foul, and foul is fair.” (1.1.10) A theme of the play...values are reversed....appearances are deceiving.

7 Analysis of Lines (Paradoxes) To analyze means to look at the smaller part and show what it adds to the whole. To analyze these lines in your small group: -identify who said it/when -explain what happened before and after -look at their significance to the play as a whole -bring in other quotes of support to connect the dots “When the battle’s lost and won” (1.1.4). 2. “Fair is foul, and foul is fair” (1.1.10). 3. “So foul and fair a day I have not seen” (1.3.38). 4. “Lesser than Macbeth and greater/Not so happy, yet much happier” ( ). 5. “…and nothing is / But what is not” ( ).

8 1. “When the battle’s lost and won” (1.1.4). Bad Weather - The second Witch says this to the other witches when they are planning when to meet again. They will meet after the battle is lost and won to meet with Macbeth. Why? So they can mess with his mind. Remember the witches’ powers are limited. They can’t physically TOUCH Macbeth. The second witch says it. She is explaining that the three witches will meet again after Cawdor is put to death and Macbeth is thane. The Thane of Cawdor will lose a title, which Macbeth will gain. Norway will lose the war that Scotland will win.

9 All the witches say this after they say they are going to meet up with Macbeth, but before we know why. This means that something may be good for someone, yet bad for someone else. There’s a winning team and a losing team. Macbeth says the same thing which links him to the witches immediately. All the witches say good is bad, and bad is good. It is good that Macbeth shall be king, but it is bad that the king will be assassinated for this. This foreshadows Macbeth’s torture over the decision whether or not to kill the king. The weather is also foul, but it is fair as Banquo and the king enter Inverness, Macbeth’s castle. The hostess, Lady Macbeth, also appears to be fair, but hides a foul idea to kill the king. In Act 3, both Banquo and Macbeth put on a fair face but are really foul – Macbeth invites Banquo to feast; Banquo suspicious of Macbeth but swears loyalty to him. 2. “ Fair is foul, and foul is fair” (1.1.10).

10 3. “So foul and fair a day I have not seen” (1.3.38). Macbeth says this to Banquo after the battle has been won against Norway. These are the first words Macbeth speaks, again linking him to the witches. It is foul because it is rainy and stormy weather, but fair because Scotland won the battle. 3. Macbeth says that he has not seen such a good day so bad. He has never met the witches, but we know he has some connection to them through these words, which are his first words, but which the witches have said previously. At the end of Act 3, we see Macbeth’s total commitment to evil as he seeks out the witches on his own.

11 4. “Lesser than Macbeth and greater/Not so happy, yet much happier” ( ). This is said by the 2 nd Witch to Banquo during the meeting with Banquo and Macbeth while they are on their journey to Forres. Macbeth will be happy because he will soon become king, but Banquo will be happier in the long run because his sons will become kings. Banquo will be lesser than Macbeth because he will never become a king, yet greater because his sons will become kings. Macbeth must commit murder to become king, yet Banquo’s sons will not. The first and second witch are saying that Banquo’s sons will be king, and that Banquo will be lesser but greater. This is the witches’ prophesy for Banquo. He will not be as happy because he will not be king, but he will be happier because he will not fall into the temptation that Macbeth will. He does not believe the witches and calls them “instruments of darkness.” This prediction by the witches causes Macbeth to plot Banquo’s and his son’s murders in Act 3.

12 5. “…and nothing is / But what is not” ( ). Macbeth says this as an “aside.” He has just found out that he is the Thane of Cawdor, and he now believes the Witches’ 3 rd prophecy that he will become king. He immediately starts thinking about murdering King Duncan, but then thinks that maybe it will happen by fate without him having to take action. Appearances from here on out are deceiving…the blurring of reality and illusion. Macbeth says that nothing is what it appears. This is the theme for Act I. Macbeth will have to kill the king to become king. He is having internal conflict already. He knows that he will have to resort to violence to get what he wants. Nothing will arise without him stirring it, beginning it. This is the difference between illusion and reality as seen in other times in the play. The king believes that Macbeth cares for him, but the truth is that Macbeth plans to kill him. Lady Macbeth encourages Macbeth to put on a false face before and after the murder of King Duncan. Both Banquo and Macbeth are suspicious of each other, but putting on an act.

13 Partner Test Analysis Practice “Fair is foul, and foul is fair, Hover through the fog and filthy air.” ( ) “All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Glamis! All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor! All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be King hereafter!” ( ) “Lesser than Macbeth, and greater/Not so happy, yet much happier/Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none.” ( ) “This supernatural soliciting /Cannot be ill, cannot be good.” ( ) “look like th’ innocent flower,/But be the serpent under ‘t.” ( ) Temptation scene 1.7 Blood Weather Clothing/Garment imagery


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