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Research you can use Judith Olson University of California Irvine.

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Presentation on theme: "Research you can use Judith Olson University of California Irvine."— Presentation transcript:

1 Research you can use Judith Olson University of California Irvine

2  Three recent events that inspired this “call to arms”  Your role in this discussion  What it means to have impact  Kinds of impact  Recap of what it means to have impact  Scope, Cost, Timeline…  Your pledge about making an impact

3  Theory based on  The literature on teams  Own own observations and interviews of over 50 ▪ Science Collaborations ▪ Corporate virtual teams  To verify theory  Need data  Online survey with advice to motivate participation  They get the help and we get the data

4  Web accessible assessment tool  Assesses  Strengths  Challenges  How to overcome the challenges

5  NSF  Had us give a talk to Federal funders in general  “I have needed this for the last 10 years! Thank you.”  Teams who were assessed welcomed advice  “It drew out patterns in the way our members work that we were not conscious of, confirmed some of our impressions, and allowed us to hear frankly from our members.  …useful as an independent evaluation tool not tied to a funding agency or other review panel”.

6  Object of study  …”to speed the translation of laboratory discoveries into treatment for patients.”  “from bench to bedside.”  National Institute of Health:  60 CTSA awards in 30 states plus DC

7 National Institutes of Health Since 2006 $733 M

8 “While most researchers know what is meant by Intellectual Merit, experience shows that many researchers have a less than clear understanding of the meaning of Broader Impacts.”

9  Many of us came to this field to change the digital world  Technology had gone awry  Many early people attracted to HCI were “Children of the 60s”

10  Our careers were caught up in the reward structures  Industry ▪ Create new products ▪ Disincentive to make findings available to others  Academia ▪ Publish new findings ▪ Stay on topic, build a reputation

11  Where have all the impacts gone  Long time passing

12  I will describe what I think it means to have impact  I will list a number of ways we do and can have an impact  You pledge…  The card on your seat ▪ What other ways can you have impact ▪ How are you going to have an impact ▪ Collected by SVs at the door as you leave

13  What “counts”  Theory gets used  Downloads/views  Profits  Degrees/Education  Technologies  Lives changed  …..  Who is impacted?  Students  Developers  Consultants  Specific populations  The general public

14  Scopes differ  You affect some people directly ▪ Interventions, teaching  You enable others to be better at making better products ▪ Toolkits  You set policy ▪ Affect a large number of people

15  Time scales differ  Now ▪ e.g. Action research  1-3 years ▪ e.g., Publications  years ▪ e.g., Theory  Assessment Tools  years ▪ e.g., Cyberinfrastructure development  ? ▪ e.g., Policy (like SOPA/PIPA)

16  Access?  Free ▪ Toolkits… ▪ Wizard ▪ ….  Fees ▪ Commercial Assessment Tools ▪ Products ▪ Educational degree ▪ ….

17  Theories  Assessment tools  Technological innovations  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action research  Teaching and teaching materials  … What else? Which kinds of impacts will YOU make?

18  “There is nothing so practical as a good theory” Kurt Lewin  “He who loves practice without theory  is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and  never knows where he may cast” Leonardo Da Vinci

19  Who  Other researchers  Consultants  Tool developers  How  Read and build on/test theory  Scope  Small at first  Time scale  1-3 or more years  Access  Free

20  Theories  Assessment tools  Technological innovations  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action research  Teaching and teaching materials What else? Which kinds of impacts will YOU make?

21  Collaboration Success Wizard  Globesmart  Myers-Briggs Personality Assessment  CogTool  …

22  Based on academic theories of cultural differences ▪ David Matsumoto ▪ Handbook of Culture and Psychology  Like the Wizard, they collect data to adjust their assessments ▪ Recent upgrade used data from 400,000 users from over 60 countries

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27  Based on the work of Carl Jung  Developed further by Myers and Briggs  Like the GlobeSmart you can see differences in values and habits with people you interact with  Dimensions of discussion  Some professional help

28  Based on work of Bonnie John ▪ Based on Card, Moran, & Newell ▪ GOMS and the Model Human Processor  A general purpose UI prototyping tool  It automatically evaluates your design with a predictive human performance model ▪ A “cognitive crash dummy”

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30 ▪ “You can compare expert use task time without recruiting participants…An excellent choice for completely new systems that don’t already have experts.”

31  Who  General public  How  Take the assessment  Scope  Could be huge  Time scale  Immediate  Access  Some are free; some cost money

32  Theories  Assessment tools  Technological innovations  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action research  Teaching and teaching materials What else? Which kinds of impacts will YOU make?

33   3-D programming environment  For telling a story  Playing an interactive game  Teaching tool for introductory programming  Formally shown to improve learning and performance Randy Pausch

34 Caitlin Kelleher, 2006

35  Using storytelling to make computer programming attractive to middle school girls  Storytelling Alice users  spent 42% more time programming  were more than three times as likely to sneak in extra time to continue working on their programs Caitlin Kelleher

36  10% of the nation’s colleges now use Alice  An accompanying textbook, lessons, test banks  88% of “at risk” students who had Alice in a pre-CS1 course were retained through CS2  3.03 GPA

37  iMuse  A requirements engineering environment where both developers and stakeholders could understand the flow Kristina Winbladh

38  Hypertext Transfer Protocol HTTP  HTTP/1.1 spec ▪ Fielding, Gettys, Mogul, Frystyk and Berners-Lee  WebDAV extension  “Architecture of the Web” ▪ Fielding and Taylor

39  Aspect Oriented Programming ▪ Difference lies in the power, safety and usability of the constructs provided  Original article downloaded 6,681 times  16,600 articles in Google Scholar with “Aspect Oriented Programming” Crista Lopes

40  Who  Students  The general public  Other developers  How  Use the technology that makes things possible  Scope  Huge  Time scale  5-10 years  Access  Often free (though products cost money)

41  Theories  Assessment tools  Technological innovations  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action research  Teaching and teaching materials What else? Which kinds of impacts will YOU make?

42  All provide conventions  So there is little new to learn  Where things go, what they look like  Sometimes task flow guide

43  What are they based on? Are they consistent? (Human Interface Guidelines)

44  Principles, patterns and practices for improving use experience  Early instance: Christian Crumlish & Erin Malone Christopher Alexander

45  Their effectiveness depends on ▪ The research they are based on ▪ The context in which they arose ▪ Their fit to the context they are being applied to

46  UI Development environments  With extra features ▪ Highly interactive ▪ Graphical ▪ Direct manipulation ▪ Automatic undo ▪ Support for animation ▪ Gesture recognition  Amulet - C++  Garnet – Common Lisp, X11, and Mac Brad Myers

47 Keeping these up to date….

48  Who  Developers  End users  How  Find and use relevant templates….  Scope  Speeds development, makes software consistent  Time scale  Immediate  Access  Free

49  Theories  Assessment tools  Technological innovations  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action research  Teaching and teaching materials What else? Which kinds of impacts will YOU make?

50  Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)/Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA)  Network neutrality  Participatory design in Scandinavia  Open access vs. commercial production of educational materials  Data sharing policies  ……

51  Who  Everyone  How  Dictates what’s possible  Scope  Huge  Time scale  ?  Access  Who gets to be in the conversation?

52  Theories  Assessment tools  Technological innovations  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action research  Teaching and teaching materials What else? Which kinds of impacts will YOU make?

53  Total views = 14,660,471

54  All videos viewed 6,813,795 times Hans Rosling A Swedish medical doctor, academic, statistician and public speaker. He is Professor of International Health at Karolinska Institute [2] and co-founder and chairman of the Gapminder Foundation, which developed the Trendalyzer software system.Karolinska Institute [2]Gapminder FoundationTrendalyzer

55  Who  The public  Students  How  YouTube, TedTalks….  Scope  Huge  Time scale  Immediate  Access  Free

56  Theories  Assessment tools  Technological innovations  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action research  Teaching and teaching materials What else? Which kinds of impacts will YOU make?

57  Helping teachers of autistic children assess behavioral incidents  Helping caretakers and clinicians of preterm infants monitor their movement and other key factors Gilllian Hayes

58  Who  Target population starting with a small group  How  New technologies to help critical situations  Scope  Small at first, larger as results are generalized  Time scale  Immediate  Access  Free

59  Theories  Assessment tools  Technological innovations  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action research  Teaching and teaching materials What else? Which kinds of impacts will YOU make?

60  Undergraduate teaching  6,970 students in a career  Ph.D. students ~40 ▪ A multiplier because they go on to teach  Teaching materials  Books for classes  Cases, exercises

61  Online resources that educate UsabilityFirst.com Hcibib.org Useit.com

62  Teaching or action kits National Center for Women in Information Technology NCWIT

63  NCWIT

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66 David Evans & Sebastian Thrun

67  Who  Students  How  Exposed to lectures, exercises, assessments  Scope  Digital media is the multiplier  Time scale  1-2 years  Access  Sometimes free; sometimes requires tuition

68  Theories  Assessment tools  Technological innovations  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action research  Teaching and teaching materials  … What else? Which kinds of impacts will YOU make?

69  Who is impacted  How  Scope  Time Scale  Access  Decisions you have to make…

70  What “counts”  Theory gets used  Downloads/views  Profits  Degrees/Education  Technologies  Lives changed  …..  Who is impacted?  Students  Developers  Consultants  Specific populations  The general public

71  Scopes differ  You affect some people directly ▪ Interventions, teaching  You enable others to be better at making better products ▪ Toolkits  You set policy ▪ Affect a large number of people

72  Time scales differ  Now ▪ e.g. Action research  1-3 years ▪ e.g., Publications  years ▪ e.g., Theory  Assessment Tools  years ▪ e.g., Cyberinfrastructure development  ? ▪ e.g., Policy (like SOPA/PIPA)

73  Is it free?  Yes ▪ Khan Academy ▪ Open Knowledge ▪ Standards, toolkits, patterns ▪ Wizard  No ▪ Udacity ▪ Meyers Briggs ▪ GlobeSmart ▪ Textbooks ▪ Degree programs ▪ Products

74  How to translate our research to have broader impacts?  How to guarantee quality?  E.g. evidence based medicine  How to make it accessible?  How to evaluate impact?

75  How careers are advanced now  Product innovation  Publications  Future  + Impact  It takes the evaluators to change the system  Promotion policy

76  Theories  Assessment Tools  Popular technologies that become standards  Guidelines, templates, patterns, toolkits and standards  Policies  New media dissemination  Action Research  Teaching and teaching materials  … Student Volunteers will collect on the way out

77  In the interest of potential impact  A video of this will appear on the ACM website and the ACM-W website 


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