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LISA KOSH,REGIONAL DISABILITY COORDINATOR MARIA ACEVEDO CORREA, MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST, PUERTO RICO CENTERS Assistive Technology Basics.

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Presentation on theme: "LISA KOSH,REGIONAL DISABILITY COORDINATOR MARIA ACEVEDO CORREA, MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST, PUERTO RICO CENTERS Assistive Technology Basics."— Presentation transcript:

1 LISA KOSH,REGIONAL DISABILITY COORDINATOR MARIA ACEVEDO CORREA, MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST, PUERTO RICO CENTERS Assistive Technology Basics

2 History of the AT Act

3 Assistive Technology Act Was first known as the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (also known as the Tech Act), was signed into law in 1988, and was amended in In 1998, the Tech Act was repealed and replaced with the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 (AT Act). The AT Act seeks to provide assistive technology to persons with disabilities, so they can more fully participate in education, employment, and daily activities on a level playing field with other members of their communities. 3

4 Purpose of the AT Act The Assistive Technology Act (AT Act) provides funds to states to support three types of programs:  The establishment of assistive technology (AT) demonstration centers, information centers, equipment loan facilities, referral services, and other consumer-oriented programs  Protection and advocacy services to help people with disabilities and their families, as they attempt to access the services for which they are eligible  Federal/state programs to provide low interest loans and other alternative financing options to help people with disabilities purchase needed assistive technology 4

5 Definitions

6 What is Assistive Technology? Assistive Technology devices is defined as: Any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities. 6

7 Assistive Technology Assistive Technology service is… directly assisting an individual with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device. 7

8 Types of Assistive Technology No-tech/Low-tech assistive technology devices are typically low cost and do not require the use of a computer or computer software to provide a benefit to an individual with a disability. Mid-tech assistive technology usually offers the same advantages of low-tech devices. They are often more lightweight and portable, allowing them to be used anywhere and are relatively inexpensive. Hi-tech assistive technology devices are costly and more complex electronic devices, such as computers and specialized software. High-tech devices often incorporate multiple features and may be used to meet a variety of needs. 8

9 Examples of No-Tech/Low-Tech Assistive Technology Raised line paper Finger spacer Pencil grips Desktop slant board Calculators (talking) Battery operated scissors Talking key chain 9

10 No-Tech/ Low-Tech Assistive Technology 10

11 Examples of Mid-Tech Assistive Technology Digital voice recorders Voice cue Dictionaries Talking watches Talking tape measure Pill organizers (with alarm) 11

12 Mid-Tech Assistive Technology 12

13 Examples of High-Tech Assistive Technology Augmentative communication devices Voice recognition software Refreshable Braille display Alternative keyboards Screen readers Screen magnification software Multi vibration alarm watches 13

14 High-Tech Assistive Technology 14

15 Assistive Technology Categories

16 Categories Aids for daily living Augmentative/speech communication Sensory aids for Deaf/hard of hearing Vision Learning, cognition, and developmental aids Computer access and instruction Environmental adaptations Mobility aids/seating and positioning Vehicle modifications Recreation, sports, and leisure 16

17 Aids for Daily Living Self-help aids for use in activities such as eating, bathing, cooking, dressing 17

18 Augmentative/Speech Communication Electronic and non- electronic devices that provide a means for expressive and receptive communication for persons with limited speech 18

19 Sensory Aids for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Include amplification devices, closed captioning systems, and environmental alert systems that assist a student who is hard of hearing or deaf with accessing information that is typically presented through verbally 19

20 Vision Assist individuals with visual disabilities or blindness to access and produce information that is typically presented in a visual format  Magnifiers  Talking calculators  Braille writers and note- taking devices  Adapted tape players  Screen reading software 20

21 Learning, Cognitive, and Developmental Aids Electronic and non electronic aids such as calculators, spell checkers, portable word processors, and computer-based software solutions 21

22 Computer Access and Instruction Devices and software solutions that enable a person with a disability to access a computer  Alternative access aids  Modified or alternative keyboards  Color Coded keyboard stickers  Special software 22

23 Environmental Adaptations Environmental and structural adaptations that remove or reduce barriers and promote access to and within the built home, employment, and community facilities for individuals with disabilities 23

24 Mobility Aids/Seating and Positioning Consists of wheelchairs (manual and electronic), walkers, and scooters that are used to increase personal mobility 24

25 Vehicle Modifications Adapted driving aids, hand controls, wheelchairs, and other lifts, modified vans and other motor vehicles used for increasing personal mobility 25

26 Recreation, Sports, & Leisure Products that enable individuals with disabilities the ability to participate in sport, health, physical education, recreation, leisure, and dance events 26

27 Accommodating Students 27

28 Meet Jason Jason is 18 years old and has both a learning disability and ADHD. In the classroom Jason experiences difficulty with reading and concentrating during class. 28

29 (Jason) Low-Tech/Mid-Tech Accommodations Talking dictionary to enhance grammar and speech skills 29

30 (Jason) No-Tech/Low-Tech Accommodations Noise cancelling headphones to reduce outside noise and provide a quieter environment 30

31 (Jason) High-Tech Accommodations Wynn Wizard (Scanning and reading software)  Reads text aloud  Color coding  Webmasking  Highlighting  Dictionary 31

32 (Jason) Product Information Talking dictionary–Franklin Noise cancelling headphones–Sony splay?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId//=- 1&XID=O:mdrnc7%2fblk:dg_gglsrch:pla&productId= Wynn Wizard Literacy Software Solution 32

33 Meet Tammy Tammy is a 19 year old student that is hard of hearing and, therefore, has a hard time hearing in the classroom. Tammy is a good lip reader but is having difficulty with taking notes while trying to read the teacher’s lips. Tammy also wears hearing aids (with a T-coil) and any assistive technology provided will need to be compatible with her hearing aid. Tammy does not know sign language 33

34 (Tammy) Mid Tech/High-Tech Accommodations Amplified neck loop  Amplifies 30 decibels  Hands free  Can be used with most corded and cordless phones -or- Listen Tech-assistive listening device  Can be used with neck loop or standalone  Portable 34

35 (Tammy) High-Tech Accommodations UbiDuo  Face to face interaction  Portable  Instant access to communication (no waiting for interpreters) 35

36 (Tammy) Mid-Tech Accommodations Wireless vibrating/chime pager  Allows easy access to reaching someone in a noisy environment  Works up to a range of about 100 feet 36

37 Tammy Assistive Technology in the Residential Setting 37

38 (Tammy) Mid-Tech Accommodations ClearSounds ShakeUp to WakeUp Large Display Alarm Clock  Bed shaker function  520 Hz square wave sound patterns  Multiple alert settings 38

39 (Tammy)Mid-Tech Accommodations HA40 Telephone Handset Amplifier  Portable  Amplifies volume on telephone headset  Amplifies incoming sounds up to 40 decibels  Adjustable incoming volume and tone control 39

40 (Tammy) Mid-Tech Accommodations Phone strobe flasher  Alerts users of incoming calls  Powered by the phone line—no additional power supply needed 40

41 (Tammy) Mid-Tech Accommodations AMAX Alertmaster Audio Alarm Monitor  Notifies users of a timer going off, smoke, fire, and carbon monoxide. 41

42 (Tammy) Mid-Tech Accommodations A12 Visual Alert System  Visual alert system alerts users to telephone calls and a doorbell  Sensors monitor the door bell and knocks on the door to alert users of visitors  Vibrating alert/bed shaker to alert while asleep 42

43 (Tammy) Product Information Wireless paging system &idstore=6&product=Vibrating-Wireless-Personal-Pager &idstore=6&product=Vibrating-Wireless-Personal-Pager ShakeUp to WakeUp HA40 Portable Telephone Handset Amplifier portable-telephone-handset-amplifier/?cat=telephone- amplifiers portable-telephone-handset-amplifier/?cat=telephone- amplifiers 43

44 (Tammy) Product Information Phone strobe flasher AMAX AlertMaster Audio Alarm Monitor alertmaster-audio-alarm-monitor/?cat=notification-systems alertmaster-audio-alarm-monitor/?cat=notification-systems AL 12 Visual Alert System alertmaster/al12-visual-alert-system/ alertmaster/al12-visual-alert-system/ 44

45 Resources 45

46 Regional Disability Coordinators Lisa Kosh-Region 1 Kimberly Jones-Regions 2, 5, 6 Nikki Jackson-Region 3 Sylvia Domagalski-Region 4 46

47 47 Job Corps Disability Web Site

48 Additional Resources Association of Assistive Technology Act Programs VR JC Program Instruction RESNA Catalyst Project Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP)– Accommodation Solutions 48

49 49 Job Accommodation Network (JAN)


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