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Program Review for Practical Living/Career Studies.

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Presentation on theme: "Program Review for Practical Living/Career Studies."— Presentation transcript:

1 Program Review for Practical Living/Career Studies

2 Section 1: Overview Section 2: Program Review Process Section 3: Using the Program Review Rubric Appendix KDE Program Review Guide for Practical Living/Career Studies

3 Internal Program Review: School Level The Kentucky Department of Education recommends that schools use a systematic, on-going process to review their programs, reflect on the evidence and use that formative information to improve their Writing, Arts & Humanities, and Practical Living/Career Studies programs. Internal program reviews for Writing, Arts & Humanities, and Practical Living/Career Studies should be conducted three times per year (beginning, mid-, and end of year) to allow for formative reflection about their programs and to monitor implementation of planned improvements.

4 Conducting a program review at the beginning of the school year allows schools to: determine their current level of performance identify program strengths and areas for needed growth develop initial improvement plans ensures programs are fully prepared for quality implementation determine where school wide integration of program skills is needed Conducting a program review mid-year: engages stakeholders in formative reflection about their programs based on identified evidence ensures that programs are being implemented as planned affirms the program needs are being addressed informs the decision to continue or adjust implementation plans Conducting a program review at the end of the school year: determines the level of school wide natural integration of the program skills across all contents, beyond the program areas provides an annual check-up for each program allows schools to reflect on the impact of program improvement decisions and implementation strategies throughout the year

5 External Program Review: District Level State Review

6 Review Committee Review committees for each program area should be determined, as sub-committees of the SBDM Council, including the following stakeholders: teacher representatives who work in the discipline teacher representatives from across content areas school leaders The team may also include: parent representatives student representatives (when possible) other relevant community stakeholders classified school staff (FRYSC coordinators, custodians, secretaries) school media specialists and other certified school staff

7 Identifying Evidence Evidence is identified to support the school’s analysis. Program review evidence may be specific for an area (Writing, Arts & Humanities, and Practical Living/Career Studies) or may be common across other reviews.

8 Convene for Rubric Assessment Process After reviewing evidence, the Review Committee should convene to complete program review rubrics. A sample Review Committee Meeting agenda is included in the appendix. Identify next steps Engage the review committee in discussion Draw on the ideas and suggestions for ongoing program improvement Examine characteristics that are noted as “Proficient.” Complete the Recommendations for Program Improvement section for each demonstrator.

9 Share the Internal Program Review Report After all program review processes are completed, the entire review set should be prepared for distribution and discussion.

10 Process for Completing and Analyzing Rubrics NOTE: These will be determined at a later date through a standards setting process Regardless of the specific discipline, the process for completing and analyzing rubrics is the same. After schools identify and review the necessary program evidence to develop a thorough program picture, school teams will complete the program- specific rubrics using the process KDE has outlined in section 3 of their materials.

11 New Scoring System Differences:  Based on a scoring system  Three levels: Needs Improvement, Proficient/Meets Expectations, Distinguished  Sample evidence included  More detail to the bullets or standards Same:  Self-evaluation  Group effort  On-going process

12 Demonstrator 1. Student Access All students should have equitable access to high quality curriculum and instruction Sample Evidence  Individual Learning Plan (ILP) student interest reports * Pacing guides/curriculum maps * Master schedule *Individualized Education Plan (IEP)/504 plans/Gifted Service Plan/ILP/Limited English Proficient(LEP) * Authentic student projects and activities from a broad representation of students in all four PL/CS disciplines *Lesson plans document differentiation for students with special needs, ELL and gifted/talented *School- Based Decision Making (SBDM) council curriculum policy, meeting agendas and minutes Needs Improvement (X 1/bullet) Proficient/Meets Expectations (X 2/bullet) Distinguished (X 3/bullet) PL/CS (includes Health, PE, Careers and Consumerism) a)PL/CS instruction is limited and offered to mainstream student populations. Expectations are low or not established for special populations. a)Advising programs are not systematically provided to students or do not draw on the components of the ILP. a)PL/CS interdisciplinary or advanced courses are not offered at the secondary level for academic credit. PL/CS (includes Health, PE, Careers and Consumerism) a)The PL/CS curriculum includes instruction for students from diverse populations (i.e., special needs, gifted/talented, ethnicity, gender, socio-economics, etc.) and maintains high quality teaching and learning. a)An advising program is provided and includes components of the ILP as part of the curriculum. a)A minimum of two PL/CS interdisciplinary and advanced courses are offered at the secondary level for academic credit. PL/CS (includes Health, PE, Careers and Consumerism) a)PL/CS teachers collaborate with special needs teachers to create customized plans to address the needs of students with special needs (i.e., special populations, gifted/talented, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic, etc). a)An advising program is offered and utilized by all students and includes all relevant components of the ILP as part of the curriculum. a)A minimum of four PL/CS interdisciplinary and advanced courses are offered at the secondary level for academic credit. Points Rationale: including a detailed list of evidence supporting judgments Recommendations for improvement :

13 Sample Evidence Individual Learning Plan (ILP) student interest reports * Pacing guides/curriculum maps * Master schedule *Individualized Education Plan (IEP)/504 plans/Gifted Service Plan/ILP/Limited English Proficient(LEP) * Authentic student projects and activities from a broad representation of students in all four PL/CS disciplines *Lesson plans document differentiation for students with special needs, ELL and gifted/talented *School-Based Decision Making (SBDM) council curriculum policy, meeting agendas and minutes Documentation of collaborative projects (e.g. lesson plans, rubrics, assessments, and culminating events) * Pacing guides/curriculum maps *Student created videos, s, web pages, brochures, multi-media, published work, peer checklists, and public service announcements * Rubrics, skill assessments, lesson plans showing a variety of strategies for instruction and assessment *Development and implementation of an individual FITT plan * Fitness Testing (e.g. FITNESSGRAM, President’s Physical Fitness Challenge, Personal Best) *Local school wellness policy * Lesson plans document differentiation for students with special needs, ELL and gifted/talented * Individualized Education Plan (IEP)/504 plans/Gifted Service Plan/ILP/Limited English Proficient(LEP) * Documentation of Guest Speakers * Serving Learning Projects * Classroom, club/student organization, and school wide projects * Newspaper articles and other media artifacts * Family Financial Literacy activities * Record of school-based / class-based enterprises * Professional Learning Communities (PLC) meeting notes and collaborative projects * List of advanced course offerings and related student participation data * Artifacts from Family Financial Literacy activities * Recognitions of student businesses * Artifacts from school-based/class-based enterprises * Student generated financial plans* Internet-based simulations with student generated work (e.g. stock market game, AAA Math, bank simulation) * Evidence of Reality Store activities on school schedule * Written curriculum * Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (PECAT) improvement plan * Documentation of physical activity opportunity offerings * Artifacts from physical activity opportunities (e.g. pictures of parent nights, flyer for fun run) * Student exercise and activity logs (e.g. intramurals, fun runs, fitness clubs)

14 Divisions P RACTICAL L IVING /C AREER S TUDIES : C URRICULUM AND I NSTRUCTION P RACTICAL L IVING /C AREER S TUDIES : F ORMATIVE AND S UMMATIVE A SSESSMENT P RACTICAL L IVING /C AREER S TUDIES : P ROFESSIONAL D EVELOPMENT AND S UPPORT S ERVICES P RACTICAL L IVING /C AREER S TUDIES : A DMINISTRATIVE /L EADERSHIP S UPPORT AND M ONITORING

15 Demonstrator 4. Student Performance When all students are provided access to an aligned and rigorous curriculum, where instructional strategies are of high quality and inclusive, student performance should be at a consistently high level. Sample Evidence  Artifacts from service learning projects * Student projects relating to consumer, health, nutrition, and environmental issues * Student generated media to inform school and community members about consumer rights, responsibilities, and issues * Number of students receiving First Aid, CPR, and babysitting certification * Number of students receiving Lifeguard, WSI, water and rescue training, CPR/First Aid certification * Student generated speeches and/or presentations for school or community groups * Industry certificates/credentials, KOSSA assessment scores * Artifacts of family/community wellness event organized and led by students * Artifacts of program activities that promote student leadership and the importance of being a leader * Newspaper articles and other media information about leadership and student organization activities * Student Career Studies Projects * Artifacts from field trips (traditional and/or virtual) * Work-based learning logs and student evaluations * Documented utilized Career Pathways using state templates (high school) * Reports from Individual Learning Plans tool * Course offering guide that reflects career majors and sequence of courses for students at the secondary and postsecondary level * Documentation from postsecondary partners showing college credit for courses taken in high school * High school course offerings catalog including examples of career major * Student assessments of physical education knowledge and skills, i.e. motor skills, physical fitness. Needs Improvement (X 1/bullet) Proficient (X 2/bullet) Distinguished(X 3/bullet) PL/CS (includes Health, PE, Careers and Consumerism) a)No service learning/community service activities are available through instruction or extra/co-curricular activities a)Student leadership opportunities are limited. a)Few student organizations or clubs are available. a)Extra/co-curricular activities related to PL/CS curriculum are limited and few students participate in at least one extra/co-curriculum activity per year. PL/CS (includes Health, PE, Careers and Consumerism) a)One service learning/community service activity is available through all PL/CS courses and extra/co-curricular activities. School-wide recycling program is completed every Tuesday. The Environmental Club coordinates this program. Every class participates and charts progress a)All students are provided opportunities to develop leadership skills in extra-curricular/co-curricular activities. Student led newspaper. Morning announcements are coordinated by student volunteers who are rotated monthly. Clubs are led by officers and team captains are used by athletic teams. Students can organize intramural teams and one person is in charge. Lists of student leaders can be found with group/activity sponsors. a)Multiple student organizations or clubs are available to encourage leadership skills development. Activity brochure is found on the school website and lists all organizations, sponsors and requirements. a)A variety of extra/co-curricular activities related to PL/CS curriculum is available and many students participate in at least one extra/co-curriculum activity per year. Co-curricular activities related to PL/CS include intramurals, athletic teams, club sports, Family and Career Leaders, fitness club, yoga, Zumba, rocket club, Teens Against Tobacco Use, quick Start Tennis, running club PL/CS (includes Health, PE, Careers and Consumerism) a)Two or more service learning/community service activities are available through all PL/CS courses and extra/co-curricular activities. a)All students are provided opportunities to develop and be recognized for their leadership skills during classroom experiences and in extra- curricular/co-curricular activities. a)Multiple student organizations or clubs are available on a regular basis to encourage leadership skills development and are adequately supported with school resources, human and material. a)A variety of extra/co-curricular activities related to PL/CS curriculum is available and each student participates in at least one extra/co- curriculum activity per year.

16 Samples of Evidence Department and/or committee minutes….give specific information such as when the meeting takes place, minutes per week or month, where minutes can be found Statements demonstrate how the listed activity relates to the standard CSIP, PD plans, IGP…must tell where the plans can be found, explain how it relates to the standard Detailed explanations of school partners, lessons, technology use, etc. as each activity relates to the standard Specify how lesson plans are differentiated, how assessment relates to standard including the types of assessments Student work that demonstrates standard and where the work can be found Communication can include newsletters, announcements, websites, etc. but an explanation of how that activity meets the standard needs to be included. Written details should be in a form that someone who knows nothing about education would understand how it relates to the standard. Partner check-lists for use in skill tests.

17 Samples of NON-Evidence Lists of activities with no explanations “no evidence” is the only thing listed. Schools should be doing something. School based activities that are not understood by those outside the school. Information is in a different format than the manner provided by the state/district. Listing classes as evidence. How does that class meet the goal of the standard. States “lesson plans” only. Should tell specifics about the lesson plan. Explaining why you can not meet that standard.

18 Expectations From FCPS Assessment Office  KDE expectations for this year – all three have to be completed in their entirety by the end of the year, and KDE will have an online entry system ready to go soon (exact due date has not been announced yet, but I’m thinking they will be expected to be complete by the end of April)  It’s an on-going process that ALL staff members in ALL subject areas should be involved with – PRs should be revisited and added to a minimum of three times over the course of the year

19 Questions & Discussion Michele Reynolds will get all questions. She will answer the questions. If she doesn’t know the answer at the moment, she will find the answer. Everyone at this meeting will receive answers to all questions asked (probably by ).


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