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1 Positive Behavior Supports Steven Gilroy CFN 207.

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1 1 Positive Behavior Supports Steven Gilroy CFN 207

2 Agenda: Positive Behavior Strategies Setting a Positive Classroom Tone Behavior Intervention Strategies from NEST Program Application to Practice—Now What? “Our words and tone of voice have a profound effect on children,” Responsive Classroom Newsletter

3 3 What Does This Quote Make You Think About With Regards Student Behavior? “I’ve come to a frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It’s my personal approach that creates the climate. It’s my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child’s life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or heal. In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a child humanized or dehumanized.” Haim G. GinottHaim G. Ginott

4 If a child doesn’t know how to read …we teach If a child doesn’t know how to swim …we teach If a child doesn’t know how to tie his shoes …we teach If a child doesn’t know how to multiply …we teach If a child doesn’t know how to behave... we? 4

5 Most Common Responses to Disciplinary Issues… Removal Increased supervision and monitoring Exclusion Counseling Suspension Referrals Placement… 5

6 6 Conscious Classroom Management

7 ABC's of Behavior If You Can Predict it…You Can Prevent it! Antecedent: what was going on just before the behavior, what is the trigger? Behavior: what happened? Consequence: what happens as a result of the behavior? Teach kids to self monitor, i.e. breathe, drink water, walk no talk 7

8 Teach Replacement Behaviors Signal to teacher when overwhelmed ​ Use words when upset ​ Keep hands to yourself (Keep hands away from other children when upset) ​ Learn to go to a quiet area independently when needing to calm down ​ Go to an adult to ask for help when transitions or peer negotiations are difficult Example: Getting Upset 8

9 Deep Breathing Techniques When upset, take five deep breaths Move away from the problem Draw a picture of what I need Tell someone abut the picture. 9

10 Break Corner Use visuals to supports students in self-monitoring behavior, Teach students to recognize when they need a break Designate an area to be used as a Break Corner (I named mine, ‘The Cozy Corner” Visual Directions present options: “I can…sit in a bean bag, squeeze a toy, listen to music, read a book, take deep breaths Offer Guidelines as to how long & how often a student can use the Break corner 10

11 Classroom Behavioral Supports Display Class Schedule & Reference Frequently Organize to Minimize Distraction and Maximize Efficiency Utilize Visual Aids and Concrete Examples to Supplement Verbal Directions Provide Opportunities for Students to Make Choices Throughout the Day 11

12 12 May I use the bathroom

13 13 Water Please

14 14 Turn It Around!  Turn it Around- If a child is continually engaging in unexpected behavior, or having difficulty following directives, he/she can be encouraged with this term, such as, “I know you can turn it around” or ‘Never too late to…”

15 15 Remember to Transition Quickly & Quietly!

16 More Supports Incorporate Strengths and Interests in Learning Activities Model Expected Behavior Rather Than Tell Students What Not To Do Highlight Appropriate Behavior in Peers Preview Upcoming Events Transitions Activities Use Class-wide Reinforcement Systems (Reward Chart) & Visual Timers to Indicate Duration Modify Environment to Accommodate Sensory Sensitivities and Sensory Overload 16

17 Teaching Routines 3=33 If you invest three weeks in teaching students the necessary routines, you will get 33 weeks of teaching! The best way to teach routines is through the use of visual cues. They can also promote on task behavior, help in overcoming difficulty with transitions, time management, & working independently Visual schedules can be an effective means of promoting consistency and communicating activities Visuals can be used in teaching expected behavior such as packing and unpacking, moving from one activity to another 17

18 5Sc Screaming/Emergency Only 4 Presentation Voice/Recess 3 Classroom Voice/ Normal Voice 2 Soft Voice/Partnership Voice 1QuQuiet Mouth/ Whisper Visual cues can be more effective when used in conjunction with non-verbal cues CLASSROOM VOICE SCALE

19 Give Me 5 Visual rubric for whole body listening  Eyes on the Speaker  Ears listening  Mouth quiet Hands down  Body calm

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23 COMMON LANGUAGE  5-Point Scale  What is Expected/Unexpected  Give Me 5  Body Bubble  Big Problem/Little Problem  Turn it Around  Me vs. We  Put your voice in your pocket  Expected vs. Unexpected  Good Enough

24 COMMON LANGUAGE  5-Point Scale: Voice Scale is a visual rubric for voice volume; used in the classrooms to help children regulate their voice according to the context  “Give Me Five” encourages children to “listen with their whole body”: eyes on the speaker, ears listening, mouth quiet, hands down, and body calm. Implementation: “I like the way so-and-so is giving me five/listening with their whole body”.  Turn it Around If a child is continually engaging in unexpected behavior, or having difficulty following directives, he/she can be encouraged with this term, such as, “I know you can turn it around” or ‘Never too late to…”

25 COMMON LANGUAGE Body Bubble This term is used to define “personal space”. Children are instructed to “stay in their own body bubble” (keeping body, hands, feet to self) Can monitor through outstretched arms. Big Problem/Little Problem When a child seems to be “getting stuck” on a “little problem”, they can be prompted by saying, “Is that a big problem, or a little problem?”, or “That may feel like a #5, but it’s really a #1 problem” We vs. Me This is used to differentiate between group & independent work Reminds kids to reflect on activities and promote working in groups 25

26 26 Body Bubble Body Bubble- This term is used to define “personal space”. Children are instructed to “stay in their own body bubble” (keeping body, hands, feet to self) Can monitor through outstretched arms.

27 A Community of Resources Building an Inclusive Community  Occupational Therapist: Executive Function  Speech Therapists: Language strategies for all students  Social Workers: Counsel to parents, staff and principal  Parent Coordinator: Bridging the gap with families

28 Next Steps  What will you try with students who misbehave?  Challenge: Choose one strategy to try with a student who will be your case study. Collect data. Be consistent for 2 weeks.  How might you work with teachers on the grade to strengthen this practice?  How will you assess its’ effectiveness?  What support will you need to be effective? 28


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