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I NCREASING S TUDENTS ’ S OCIAL ENGAGEMENT Adobe Connect Meeting May 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "I NCREASING S TUDENTS ’ S OCIAL ENGAGEMENT Adobe Connect Meeting May 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 I NCREASING S TUDENTS ’ S OCIAL ENGAGEMENT Adobe Connect Meeting May 2012

2 Social Engagement Every school has students who feel invisible, alienated, and alone. The extent to which schools and communities are willing to face that reality together determines the real safety of the learning environment.

3 Social Engagement In a national sample of 148,189 sixth to twelfth graders: – only 29%–45% of surveyed students reported that they had social competencies such as empathy, decision making, and conflict resolution skills, and – Only 29% indicated that their school provided a caring, encouraging environment (Benson, 2006).

4 What is Social-Emotional Learning? Social and emotional learning (SEL) is the process of purposefully: – developing the ability to recognize and manage emotions in self and others – developing care and concern for others – making responsible decisions – establishing positive relationships – handling challenging situations effectively From: Safe and Sound (CASEL 2003)

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6 CASEL, 2011

7 Comprehensive Social-Emotional Instruction Five Critical Components: Self-Awareness (identifying emotions, self-confidence, self- efficacy) Self-Management (impulse control, stress management, self-discipline, motivation, goal setting, organizational skills) Social-Awareness (perspective taking, empathy, appreciating diversity, respect for others) Relationship Skills (communication, social engagement, relationships, cooperation, resolving conflicts, seeking help or helping) Responsible Decision Making (problem solving skills, ethical responsibility) CASEL, 2011

8 SEL Outcomes From Safe and Sound (CASEL, 2003)

9 SEL Outcomes Are effective in both school and after-school settings and for students with and without behavioral and emotional problems Are effective for racially and ethnically diverse students from urban, rural, and suburban settings across the K-12 grade range Improve students’ social-emotional skills, attitudes about self and others, connection to school, and positive social behavior; and reduce conduct problems and emotional distress CASEL

10 Coordinating Educational Strategies Strategy #1 Provide instruction in processing, integrating, and selectively applying social and emotional skills in developmentally, contextually, and culturally appropriate ways Instruction should include explicit teaching, modeling of critical skills as well as guided practice, and structured opportunities for students to apply the skills independently Durlak, Weissberg, Dymnicki, Taylor, & Schellinger, 2011

11 Multi-Tiered Support Example Tier 1 (All Students) Provide explicit social skills instruction utilizing the Cooperative Thinking Strategies Curriculum during home room period. Tier 2 (Supplemental Instruction: Small Group) Review skill taught during homeroom and provide role playing and authentic opportunities for practice along with additional instruction on why and when to apply the strategy Tier 3 (Intensive Instruction: Very Small Group or individual) Pre-teach missing foundational skills (e.g., listening skills) and preview skill to be taught in core instruction. Provide role play and authentic opportunities to practice skill across a variety of settings and situations. Assist students in understanding why and when to apply the skills. Support the students in setting goals around utilizing the skill and provide self-monitoring strategies and progress monitoring tools. Ensure coherence between intervention providers.

12 Video Examples Teaching Social Emotional Skills social-emotional-learning-video Technology Integration Example k7w

13 Coordinating Educational Strategies Strategy #2 Intentionally provide opportunities for all students to contribute to their class, school, and community and experience the satisfaction, sense of belonging, and enhanced motivation that comes from such involvement Such opportunities may include structured peer collaboration, service learning projects, and school to work experiences Durlak, Weissberg, Dymnicki, Taylor, & Schellinger, 2011

14 Multi-Tiered Support Example Tier 1 (All Students) Provide opportunities for structured peer collaboration within each lesson cycle Facilitate the application of content to social issues and problems which are important within the community and to the students Tier 2 (Supplemental Instruction) Provide students with service learning opportunities and high status jobs on campus Pre-teach “employability skills,” teach students to set goals and self- monitor skill application and outcomes Provide bi-weekly feedback and advisement Tier 3 (Intensive Instruction: Very small group or individual) Provide students with supported service learning opportunities and high status jobs on campus Pre-teach “employability skills,” teach students to set goals and self- monitor skill application and outcomes Provide weekly feedback and advisement

15 Video Examples Strategies for Group Work https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/te aching-with-group-work https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/te aching-with-group-work Teaching Through Service Learning service-learning-jim-berman service-learning-jim-berman

16 Coordinating Educational Strategies Strategy #3 Establish safe, caring learning environments, include peer and family initiatives, improve classroom management and teaching practices, and implement whole-school community-building activities Durlak, Weissberg, Dymnicki, Taylor, & Schellinger, 2011

17 Social Engagement Programs emphasizing school-wide conflict resolution, peer mediation, and direct teaching of social skills and self- management strategies have shown positive effects Learning First Alliance, 2001

18 Multi-Tiered Example Tier 1 (All Students) Provide explicit social skills instruction utilizing the Community Building Curriculum during home room period. Implement peer mediation program Tier 2 (Supplemental Instruction: Small Group) Review skill taught during homeroom and provide role playing and authentic opportunities for practice along with additional instruction on why and when to apply the strategy Implement bully prevention program utilizing Bullies, Victims, and Bystanders curriculum Implement conflict resolution program Set goals and teach self-monitoring Monitor and provide feedback bi-weekly Tier 3 (Intensive Instruction: Very Small Group or individual) Pre-teach missing foundational skills (e.g., anger management) and preview skill to be taught in core instruction and supplemental instruction. Provide role play and authentic opportunities to practice skill across a variety of settings and situations. Assist students in understanding why and when to apply the skills. Support the students in setting goals around utilizing the skill and provide self-monitoring strategies and progress monitoring tools. Ensure coherence between intervention providers. Monitor and provide feedback weekly.

19 Video Example Building Community https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/mi ddle-school-class-culture https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/mi ddle-school-class-culture Peer Mediation Example

20 Social-Emotional Learning Programs Effective programs and approaches are typically sequenced, active, focused, and explicit (S.A.F.E.), meaning they: S: use a Sequenced set of activities to achieve skill objectives A: use Active forms of learning F: include at least one program component Focused on developing personal or social skills E: Explicitly target particular personal or social skills for development CASEL

21 Instructional/Intervention Implications School-based programs are most effectively conducted by school staff (e.g., teachers, student support staff) indicating that they can be incorporated into routine educational practice Explicitly teaching social-engagement skills and expectations is critical and should be embedded alongside academic instruction Regularly providing students with structured opportunities to work together will allow students to apply and practice what they have learned

22 Modeling Positive Relationship Skills Strive for a High Ratio of Positive Interactions with Students (Sprick, Borgmeier, & Nolet, 2002). Commit to a Short Series of Positive ‘Micro- Conversations’ (Mendler, 2000). Emphasize the Positive in Teacher Requests (Braithwaite, 2001). Strive for at Least One Daily Positive Verbal Interaction (Fields, 2004).

23 Transition Programs Implement summer transition programs aimed at building a sense of community and connectedness amongst incoming student Implement 6 th and 9 th grade academies intentional community building and increased academic and behavioral supports Provide 6 th and 9 th grade transition courses for students who are at-risk for becoming off-track for on-time progression or graduation

24 Extra-Curricular Activity Involvement Expand extra-curricular activities to provide greater access and draw for a wide range of students Intentionally facilitate uninvolved students’ participation in extra-curricular activities – Connect with adult sponsor and peer member

25 Service Learning Provide opportunities for service learning and desirable on-campus jobs – e.g., Student technology support team – e.g., Peer mentoring and leadership groups Encourage the formation of and participation in academically oriented peer groups and peer groups which focus on service learning and community outreach

26 Adult and Peer Mentoring Implement a school-wide peer mentoring program pairing academically and behaviorally successful students with at-risk students – Schedule a credit generating Leadership Course during intervention/enrichment block to facilitate regular mentoring sessions Implement mentoring programs which pair college educated or college-attending mentors with students Implement a transition mentoring/tutoring program – Middle school students mentor elementary school student – High school students mentor middle school students

27 Virtual Mentoring If you do not have easy access to your feeder schools or have difficulty getting mentors to come on-site to provide mentoring… – Consider virtual mentoring and tutoring options – _infusion_languagearts _infusion_languagearts

28 Check & Connect Strategy incorporates close monitoring of school performance, mentoring, case management, and other supports. Check-- continually assess student engagement through close monitoring of student performance and progress indicators. Connect-- provide individualized attention and mentoring to students, in partnership with school personnel, family members, and community service providers. Students enrolled in Check & Connect are assigned a “monitor” who regularly reviews their performance (in particular, whether students are having attendance, behavior, or academic problems) and intervenes when problems are identified. The monitor also advocates for students, coordinates services, provides ongoing feedback and encouragement, and emphasizes the importance of staying in school. What Works Clearinghouse

29 Implementation Implementations Make sure there is structure Make sure there is support and communiction between mentors

30 ALAS Intervention for middle and high school students Each student is assigned a counselor/mentor who monitors attendance, behavior, and academic achievement. The counselor/mentor provides feedback and coordinates interventions and resources to students, families, and teachers. Counselors/mentors also serve as advocates for students and intervene when problems are identified. Students are trained in problem-solving, self-control, and assertiveness skills. Parents are trained in parent-child problem solving, how to participate in school activities, and how to contact teachers and school administrators to address issues. What Works Clearinghouse

31 Coping Power Emphasizes social and emotional skills that are needed during the transition to middle school. Incorporates child and parent components. Child component consists of thirty-four, 50-minute group sessions and periodic individual sessions over the course of 15–18 months, although the program can be shortened to fit into a single school year Lessons focus on goal setting, problem solving, anger management, and peer relationships. Parent component is composed of 16 group sessions and periodic individual meetings. Lessons support the child component of the program and address setting expectations, praise, discipline, managing stress, communication, and child study skills. What Works Clearinghouse

32 Lions Quest Skills for Adolescence School-wide program designed for middle school students (grades 6–8) Designed to promote good citizenship skills, core character values, and social-emotional skills and discourage the use of drugs, alcohol, and violence Program includes a classroom curriculum, school-wide practices to create a positive school climate, parent and family involvement, and community involvement The curriculum may vary in scope and intensity, lasting from nine weeks to three years. Lessons use cooperative group learning exercises and classroom management techniques to improve classroom climate. What Works Clearinghouse

33 Putting it all together… hammond-social-emotional-video hammond-social-emotional-video


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