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Marijuana The Blunt Truth. What they say it is  It’s just a plant!

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Presentation on theme: "Marijuana The Blunt Truth. What they say it is  It’s just a plant!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Marijuana The Blunt Truth

2 What they say it is  It’s just a plant!

3 What it really is!

4 Marijuana = Cannabis  Cannabinoids -chemical compounds that interact with receptors in the brain cells and repress the release of neurotransmitters in the brain  Delta 9 Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) –active psychedelic compound  Cannabidiol (CBD)- oil extract used to treat seizure disorders  Varieties include Sativa, Indica, and Ruderalis (has the highest prevalence of CBD)

5 Sativa vs. Indica  Origin Sativa originates around the equator. Most commonly found in countries like Mexico, Thailand, and certain African countries vs. Indica which originates in countries of higher altitude such as Afghanistan, Turkey, and Morocco.

6 Sativa vs. Indica  Size Sativa is a much taller and thinner plant than Indica which is short and wide. Sativa grown indoors can reach heights of 6 feet (25 feet for outdoor plants) vs Indica which typically grows around 3 feet.

7 Sativa vs. Indica  Effect/High Sativa tends to have higher concentrates of THCs and fewer CBDs than Indica giving it a much greater “high”. Hightimes.com states that Sativa plants cured for more than 24 months can give a high that “had no ceiling, meaning that with every new joint you smoked you just got higher and higher”. Indica has the strongest analgesic effect making it more common for medical use. Indica gives you that “couch-locked “I want to sit and play PlayStation” kind of feeling”. (hightimes.com). Sativa users tend to feel more “energetic” vs Indica who tend to feel more “stoned”.

8 Sativa vs. Indica

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10 Marijuana vs. Hemp  Hemp is a strain of the Cannabis Sativa plant ( Cannabis Sativa L )  Hemp producers use the stalk and the seeds to make products for industrial use (ex. Rope. Lotions, Detergents, Papers, etc.)  Marijuana producers use the flowers/buds  Hemp has a low THC content (0.3%-1.5% THC)  Marijuana has a higher THC content (5%-10% and higher)

11 Marijuana vs. Hash  Marijuana is made from dried parts of the cannabis plant (flowering tops, leaves, stems, and sometimes seeds)  Hash is a pure resin separated from the flowering tops of the cannabis plant. The resin is processed into oils (often called BHO or Butane Hash Oil) and waxes (blocks or bricks). Slang names include “honey oil, ear wax, budder, shatter”.

12 Marijuana

13 Hash

14 Hash Oil

15 Ways to Consume  Smoke

16 Ways to Consume  Smoke

17 Ways to Consume  Vaporizing

18 Ways to Consume  Edibles

19 Ways to Consume  Edibles

20 Ways to Consume  Edibles

21 Ways to Consume  Edibles

22 Ways to Consume  Teas, Sodas, and Juices

23 Ways to Consume  Ointments and Lotions

24 Ways to Consume  Dabbing

25 The Pro-Marijuana Movement

26  NORML National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws  Founded by attorney Keith Stroup in  NORML's mission is to move public opinion sufficiently to legalize the responsible use of marijuana by adults, and to serve as an advocate for consumers to assure they have access to high quality marijuana that is safe, convenient and affordable. Source: National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws;

27 The Pro-Marijuana Movement  According to their website, NORML "supports the removal of all criminal penalties for the private possession and responsible use of marijuana by adults, including the cultivation for personal use, and the casual nonprofit transfers of small amounts," and "supports the development of a legally controlled market for cannabis."(NORML policy statement on personal use)  Since its founding in 1970 NORML has evolved into a vast network with 135 chapters and over 550 lawyers.  NORML South Carolina Chapter 2025 Marion St, Columbia (ColumbiaNorml Facebook page) Source: National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws;

28 The Pro-Marijuana Movement  MPP Marijuana Policy Project  Founded in 1995 by MPP co-founders Rob Kampia, Chuck Thomas, and Mike Kirshner formerly of NORML.  MPP is the largest organization in the U.S. that's focused solely on ending marijuana prohibition. MPP's mission is to change federal law to allow states to determine their own marijuana policies without federal interference, as well as to regulate marijuana like alcohol in all 50 states, D.C., and the five territories.  MPP’s motto is We Change Laws Source: Marijuana Policy Project;

29 The Pro-Marijuana Movement  MPP’s current goals for 2014 and beyond include:  Pass medical marijuana legislation in Maryland, Minnesota, New York, and West Virginia by 2017  Pass decriminalization legislation in Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, and D.C. making it a ticketable offense rather than receiving jail time. Pass in Illinois by  Legalize recreational use in Rhode Island through the legislature (would be the first state to do so). Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, New Hampshire, and Vermont between and Texas in  Legalize recreational use by ballot initiative in Alaska and Oregon in 2014, Nevada, Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Montana in Source: Marijuana Policy Project;

30 The Pro-Marijuana Movement  Drug Policy Alliance  The Drug Policy Alliance was formed when the Drug Policy Foundation and the Lindesmith Center merged in July Ethan Nadelmann is the founder and executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance. Nadelmann founded the Lindesmith Center in 1994 through the financial support of George Soros.  The Drug Policy Alliance is the nation's leading organization promoting drug policies that are grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights. Source: Drug Policy Alliance;

31 Timeline of Medical Marijuana Legalization by Ballot Initiative  1996 California (Proposition 215)  1998 Alaska, Washington, Oregon  1999 Maine  2000 Nevada, Colorado  2004 Montana  2008 Michigan  2010 Arizona  2012 Massachusetts

32 Timeline of Medical Marijuana Legalization by Legislature  2000 Hawaii  2004 Vermont  2006 Rhode Island  2007 New Mexico  2010 District of Columbia, New Jersey  2011 Delaware  2012 Connecticut  2013 New Hampshire, Illinois  2014 Maryland, Minnesota, New York

33 States That Have Decriminalized Marijuana  Alaska  California  Colorado  Connecticut  District of Columbia  Maine  Maryland  Massachusetts  Minnesota  Mississippi  Nebraska  Nevada  New York  North Carolina  Ohio  Oregon  Rhode Island  Vermont Typically, decriminalization means no prison time or criminal record for first-time possession of a small amount for personal consumption. The conduct is treated like a minor traffic violation.

34 The Great Social Experiment of the 21 st Century  November 8, 2012 Colorado and Washington pass ballot initiatives legalizing the use of marijuana for recreational purposes.

35 The Great Social Experiment of the 21 st Century  November 4, 2014 Alaska and Oregon pass ballot initiatives legalizing the use of marijuana for recreational purposes.

36 The Great Social Experiment of the 21 st Century  November 4, 2014 The District of Columbia passed a ballot initiative allowing for the possession of small amounts for recreational purposes. Individuals are also allowed to grow up to 6 plants and purchase paraphernalia for use or growing. Does NOT allow for the SALE of recreational marijuana.

37 States Targeted for Medical Marijuana Legalization by 2016  Florida (voters did not pass in 2014)  Idaho  Alabama  West Virginia Source: SAM Smart Approaches to Marijuana; Marijuana Policy Project;

38 States Targeted for Recreational Marijuana Legalization  California  Hawaii  Nevada  Arizona  Maine  Montana  New Hampshire  Vermont  Massachusetts  Rhode Island  Maryland Source: SAM Smart Approaches to Marijuana; Marijuana Policy Project;

39 What About South Carolina  It will never happen in South Carolina!  South Carolina is too Conservative!  Not in the Bible Belt!

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41 5 Steps to Legalization  STEP 1 Legalization of Industrial Hemp  S839 Industrial Hemp Bill  Lawful to grow Industrial Hemp  Prohibit growing marijuana and hemp on same land  Hemp and Marijuana both come from the same plant - Cannabis Sativa L.  The term 'Hemp' commonly refers to the industrial/commercial use of the cannabis stalk and seed for textiles, foods, papers, body care products, detergents, plastics and building materials.  Industrial hemp contains only about 0.3% - 1.5% THC  Passed and signed by Governor June 2, 2014

42 5 Steps to Legalization  STEP 2 Legalization of Cannabidiol (CBD Oil) for Medical Purposes  S1035 & H4803 Julian’s Law  Medical Cannabis Therapeutic Treatment Research Act  Development of clinical trials to study FDA approved uses of Cannabidiol (CBD Oil also called Charlotte’s Web) to treat certain forms of Epilepsy  Creates a study committee to develop a plan for the sale and use of medical marijuana.  Passed S1035 and signed by Governor on June 2, 2014

43 5 Steps to Legalization  STEP 3 Legalization of Medical Marijuana  H4872 & H4879 Medical Marijuana Act (Filed 2014)  H3140 “Putting Patients First Act” (Pre-filed Dec 2014)  Authorize Physicians to recommend the medical use of marijuana for Cancer, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS,  A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition, that results in one or more of the following : severe pain; severe nausea; seizures; persistent muscle spasms, cachexia, or any other DHEC approved condition.  Operation of dispensaries to cultivate, grow, and dispense marijuana for medical use.  Progress: 1 st reading on 1/13/2015. Referred to Judiciary Committee. Gathering Additional Sponsors

44 5 Steps to Legalization  STEP 4 H3117 Decriminalization  To amend code of laws of South Carolina, 1976, related to controlled substance offences and penalties.  DECRIMINALIZE possession of 28 grams or one ounce or less of marijuana or ten grams or less of hashish  Authorize law enforcement to issue a CIVIL citation for possession of that same quantity of marijuana or hashish.  Progress: 1 st reading on 1/13/2015. Referred to Judiciary Committee

45 5 Steps to Legalization  STEP 5 Legalization of Recreational Use PARTY ON DUDE!  Progress???

46 Everyone is Watching Colorado

47 Impact of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado  Impaired Driving  Traffic fatalities involving operators testing positive for marijuana have increased 100 percent from 2007 to  The majority of driving-under-the-influence-of-drugs arrests involve marijuana and 25 to 40 percent were marijuana alone.  Toxicology reports with positive marijuana results for driving under the influence have increased 16 percent from 2011 to Source: The Legalization of Marijuana In Colorado: The Impact, Volume 2, August 2014, Executive Summary, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

48 Impact of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado  Youth Marijuana Use  In 2012, percent of youth ages 12 to 17 were considered current marijuana users compared to 7.55 percent nationally. Colorado, ranked 4th in the nation, was 39 percent higher than the national average.  Drug-related suspensions/expulsions increased 32 percent from school years 2008/2009 through 2012/2013. The vast majority were for marijuana violations. Source: The Legalization of Marijuana In Colorado: The Impact, Volume 2, August 2014, Executive Summary, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

49 Impact of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado  Adult Marijuana Use  In 2012, percent of college age students (ages 18 – 25 years) were considered current marijuana users compared to percent nationally. Colorado, ranked 3rd in the nation, was 42 percent higher than the national average.  In 2013, 48.4 percent of Denver adult arrestees tested positive for marijuana which is a 16 percent increase from Source: The Legalization of Marijuana In Colorado: The Impact, Volume 2, August 2014, Executive Summary, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

50 Impact of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado  Emergency Room Visits  From 2011 through 2013, there was a 57 percent increase in marijuana-related emergency room visits.  Hospitalizations related to marijuana have increased 82 percent from 2008 to  In 2012, the City of Denver rate for marijuana-related emergency visits was 45 percent higher than the rate in Colorado. Source: The Legalization of Marijuana In Colorado: The Impact, Volume 2, August 2014, Executive Summary, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

51 Impact of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado  Marijuana Related Exposure  Marijuana-related exposures for children ages 0 to 5 on average have increased 268 percent from 2006–2009 to  Colorado’s rate of marijuana-related exposures is triple the national average. Source: The Legalization of Marijuana In Colorado: The Impact, Volume 2, August 2014, Executive Summary, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

52 Impact of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado  D iversion of Colorado Marijuana  Highway interdiction seizures of Colorado marijuana destined to 40 other states increased 397 percent from 2008 to  The average pounds of Colorado marijuana seized, destined for other states, increased 33.5 percent from 2005 to 2008 compared to 2009 to Source: The Legalization of Marijuana In Colorado: The Impact, Volume 2, August 2014, Executive Summary, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

53 Impact of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado  THC Extraction Labs  In 2013, there were 12 THC extraction lab explosions and in the first half of 2014 the amount more than doubled.  In 2013, there were 18 injuries from THC extraction labs and in the first half of 2014 there were 27 injuries. Source: The Legalization of Marijuana In Colorado: The Impact, Volume 2, August 2014, Executive Summary, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

54 Impact of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado  Related Data  Overall, crime in Denver increased 6.7 percent from the first six months of 2013 to the first six months of  The number of pets poisoned from ingesting marijuana has increased four-fold in the past six years.  Colorado estimates for annual revenue from the sale of recreational marijuana varies from $65 million (.6 percent of all expected general fund revenue) to $118 million (1.2 percent of all expected general fund revenue)  The majority of counties and cities in Colorado have banned recreational marijuana businesses  THC potency has risen from an average of 3.96 percent in 1995 to an average of percent in 2013 Source: The Legalization of Marijuana In Colorado: The Impact, Volume 2, August 2014, Executive Summary, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area

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