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The Highly Qualified Teacher Provisions of the No Child Left Behind law (NCLB) “What Every Manager Needs to Know." By: Tracy Alberry, Jennifer Blum, John.

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Presentation on theme: "The Highly Qualified Teacher Provisions of the No Child Left Behind law (NCLB) “What Every Manager Needs to Know." By: Tracy Alberry, Jennifer Blum, John."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Highly Qualified Teacher Provisions of the No Child Left Behind law (NCLB) “What Every Manager Needs to Know." By: Tracy Alberry, Jennifer Blum, John Muratet, and Linda Faulk

2 CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP ONE HIGH QUALITY, EXPERIENCED TEACHER AT A TIME California Department of Education No Child Left Behind Requirements

3 BACKGROUND NCLB The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 evolved out of the 1999 reauthorization process of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). ESEA was a congressionally mandated program that was scheduled for reauthorization every five years (Gordon, Morgan, O'Malley, & Ponticell, 2007). ESEA contained important titles or statutory provisions that addressed specific areas of educational need (Gordon et al., 2007, p. 11).

4 Teacher Quality A major objective of No Child Left Behind is to ensure high-quality teachers for all students, regardless of race, ethnicity or income. Research demonstrates the clear correlation between student academic achievement and teacher quality.

5 What kind of teachers do we want?

6 5 AREAS Managers should know: 1. Deadlines and the law 2. Teacher High Quality Requirements 3. Who is not considered High Quality? 4. Flexibility 5. Compliance and Accountability

7 Requirements No Child Left Behind requires local school districts to ensure that all teachers hired to teach core academic subjects in Title I programs after the first day of the school year are highly qualified. All other teachers teaching the following subjects must become “highly qualified” no later than June 2006 – arts, English, foreign languages, math, reading, science, and social studies.

8 NCLB Compliance NCLB HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHER Bachelors Degree APPROPRIATE California Credential Subject Matter Competency

9 Requirements In general a "highly qualified teacher" is one with full certification, a bachelor's degree and demonstrated competence in subject knowledge and teaching. (Core subjects include English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history and geography.) The act also calls for all teachers of the core academic subjects (teaching in Title I programs or elsewhere) to be highly qualified by the end of school year

10 Requirements of NCLB Every school must keep a file with information about the qualifications of its teachers. Teachers in public schools must be “highly qualified”. *This includes special education teachers.

11 According to the RUSD Director of Human Resources, Kathleen Sanchez: “We do require all teachers to be HQT and EL Certified prior to hiring. There are exceptions in the high need areas of Mathematics, Science and Special Education. In regards to elementary all teachers must be HQT and EL certified prior to interviewing. It is not listed on the application, since we do not want to exclude individuals that may have special skills.”

12 No Child Left Behind Teacher Requirements and Local Education Agencies (LEA) Responsibilities One key goal of the federal reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), also known as the No Child Left Behind (NCLB), is that all students are taught by highly qualified teachers. Due to changes in some requirements for credentials some teachers must take additional subject specific exams or classes to meet the new criteria.

13 Definitions Highly Qualified New criteria was developed under NCLB Not new teachers (credentialed before July 1, 2002) were given a window of time to meet the new requirements. Middle school teachers were most effected by the changes and were required to take competency test or classes to become HQ in their subject matter. A Multiple Subject Credential meets the Calif. Teaching commission requirements but not NCLB subject matter requirement. In California a CLAD credential is also required

14 No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 As required by NCLB: States must ensure that poor and minority children are not taught at higher rates than other children by inexperienced, under- qualified, and out-of-field teachers. Federal Law requires the California Department of Education to ensure the completeness and accuracy of Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) data reported to the State by Local Education Agencies include….

15 Data reported to the State by Local Education Agencies include…. Report to parents and the public on classes taught by non-highly qualified teachers Have ensured that experienced and qualified teachers are equitably distributed among classrooms with poor and minority children and those of their peers Hire only HQ teachers in Title II Class Size Reduction and Title I programs

16 Equitable Distribution What we can expect:  Local Education Agencies that cannot demonstrate current equitable teacher distribution must create a comprehensive, three phase plan to ensure an equitable distribution of highly qualified and experienced teachers within the District.

17 Noncompliant NCLB Who does not meet NCLB requirements? Teachers on Emergency Permits. Teachers on Waivers. Teachers w/supplemental authorization. (except where its based on a major in the subject taught) Teachers who hold Pre-Intern Certificates. Teachers who are using an Employer Assignment Option. (ex. Board Resolutions/Committee on Assignments)

18 Meeting Criteria #1 when there is no major, minor or Praxis test. Educators on emergency license in the following areas will meet Criteria 1 if they hold the prerequisite license listed: Emergency license or permit requested in: Regular license that will meet criteria #1 Reading, special education or bilingual education. Elementary education Extension of the grade/developmental level of an existing license. The existing license A related area to an existing license (e.g. general music when holds choral or learning disabilities when holds cognitive disabilities). Holding a license in one of the areas of music or one of the disabilities of special education. 18

19 To think about... A person may be an excellent teacher - yet not meet the criteria established under NCLB to be labeled high quality. Conversely, a teacher may meet the criteria established under NCLB to be labeled high quality, yet be a poor teacher in the classroom.

20 Elementary Requirements NEW Bachelor’s Degree Credential or Intern Certificate for no more than 3 years. Core knowledge exam such as CSET or MSAT. NOT NEW Bachelor’s Degree Credential or Intern Certificate for no more than 3 years. Core knowledge exam such as CSET, MSAT, NTE, Praxis, etc -- or HOUSE or National Board Certification Elementary Ed Degree

21 Middle/High Requirements NEW Bachelor’s Degree Credential or Intern or Certificate for no more than 3 years. Subject matter exam in each subject taught or Coursework NOT NEW Bachelor’s Degree Credential or Intern or Certificate for no more than 3 years. Subject matter exam in each subject taught or Coursework or National Board Certification or HOUSSE

22 Flexibility As the deadline for schools to staff all positions with highly qualified teachers, the Department of Education has provided some flexibility in three areas to assist teachers, schools and students. 1. Rural Schools: Nearly 1/3 or 5000 school districts are designated as Rural. The new rules allow a teacher who is highly qualified in one subject 3 years to become highly qualified in additional subjects they teach. Such teachers must be provided some structured mentoring, supervision or professional development.

23 Flexibility continued 2. Science Teachers: Most science teachers have to teach in more than one area, and are now allowed to become highly qualified in a broad field like general science, and may be allowed to add to their certification. 3. Multi-subject teachers: New streamlined process allows multi-subject teachers to become highly qualified without having to qualify in each individual subject.

24 Existing Flexibility Special Education Teachers are not necessarily subject to the same highly qualified rules depending on the scope of their job. If their job is to assist classroom teachers, or teach in non-core subjects or provide support, they do not need to provide evidence of the highly qualified status. Legislation is currently being considered to identify how the rules should apply to Special Education Teachers.

25 Existing Flexibility Continued Middle school teachers: Many states have varying requirements for teachers in middle school grades. States may design special testing for these teachers in the future. Testing: Most states have content specific tests that are used to determine competency. According to the federal law, states are allowed to tailor these tests to maximize level of competency needed for effective instruction.

26 “Quality……. Is everyone’s responsibility.” W. Edwards Deming 26

27 Why is it important? Michigan Department of Education could lose funding. “Michigan now has until June 2009 to comply with federal standards or face potential loss of funding through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.” (Shane, 2008) From: /article.aspx?id=9758

28 Background information During the , CDE formalized its collection of highly qualified teacher data by creating a reporting system for the federal requirement to monitor the number of core academic classes taught by educators who are “not highly qualified”. 28

29 How do districts report “highly qualified teacher” information each year? There are two reports districts shall utilize. Every district submits the “Highly Qualified Teacher Plan” (PI-9550-IIC) by November 15. Those districts who employ educators who are “not highly qualified” also submit the “Highly Qualified Teacher Plan-Final Report” (PI-9550-IIC3 ) by June

30 Highly Qualified Teacher Plan (PI-9550-IIC) Due November 15. Is submitted by every district each year even if every educator of core academic subjects in the district is “highly qualified”. Lists any “not highly qualified” educators. describes the district’s plan for providing technical assistance to educators who are “not highly qualified” in their district. 30

31 What are some examples of technical assistance a district can provide? Collaborate with institutions of higher education to offer flexible licensure programs in areas of need or to meet the requirement for a major or minor. Provide information about licensure programs at institutions of higher education in this state, WI approved alternative education programs or other on-line programs through institutions of higher education upon hiring educators who need an emergency license or permit. 31 Provide release time so that teachers can complete course work when evening or weekend courses are not available.

32 Examples of technical assistance, continued Provide or help teachers find tutoring to facilitate passing all Praxis tests required for licensure. Purchase study guides for Praxis tests. 32 Create workshops to assist teachers with such topics as test taking. Monitor teacher progress in gaining admission to and progress toward completing an approved program.

33 What information may assist districts with highly qualified teacher reporting? Annual School District Staff Report (PI-1202) licensure audit conducted each wintermay bring to light educators who need emergency licenses to teach core academic subjects. Highly qualified teacher information provided on the emergency license application (PI-1602-EL). 33

34 Highly Qualified Teacher Plan-Final Report (PI-9550-IIC3 ) Due June 30 of each school year for districts who employ educators of core academic subjects who are “not highly qualified.” 34 Gives an end of school year update on the status of educators who were “not highly qualified” and any continued technical assistance the district will provide to these educators.

35 Additionally… At the beginning of every school year since NCLB was adopted, each district must notify parents if their child in a Title I program has been assigned to a class with a teacher who is not highly qualified. (NCLB 1111 (h)(6)(B)(ii)). Under the federal law, parents must also be notified if their child has been taught for four or more consecutive weeks by a teacher who is not highly qualified.

36 In Summary a manager should know.. 1. Deadlines and the law on Highly Qualified 2. Teacher High Quality Requirements 3. Who is not considered High Quality? 4. Flexibility-what flexibility exists 5. Compliance and Accountability-What must an LEA/District do to be compliant and accountable.

37 Questions? For more information see:


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