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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Personal Protective Equipment Under 29 CFR 1910.132 OSHA requires that personal.

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Presentation on theme: "PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Personal Protective Equipment Under 29 CFR 1910.132 OSHA requires that personal."— Presentation transcript:

1 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Personal Protective Equipment Under 29 CFR OSHA requires that personal protective clothing and equipment be provided by employers and used by employees.

2 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M What Constitutes Personal Protective Equipment (“PPE”)? PPE includes all equipment or apparel designed to provide workers with a barrier against workplace hazards. PPE protects employees from the effects of exposure to chemical, physical, and safety hazards.

3 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M OSHA Protective Equipment Regulations OSHA requires that employers conduct Hazard Assessments at the workplace to determine if there are, or are likely to be, hazards that call for the use of PPE. Employers must provide appropriate PPE and must train employees to use appropriate PPE when necessary.

4 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M What is a Hazard Assessment? A Hazard Assessment is the critical evaluation of a work site to document the existence and/or severity of a hazard and the specific PPE that should be used to protect employees from the hazard.

5 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Hazard Assessments A hazard assessment must be included as part of each site-specific ENVIRON HASP or it must be conducted by Facility personnel prior to a site visit. Facility personnel should call or meet with Host facility representatives prior to the actual site visit to determine hazards that may require the use of PPE including: physical hazards, chemical hazards, and biological hazards.

6 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M ENVIRON’s PPE Policy Based on results from hazard assessments, Project Managers will work with HSCs to determine appropriate PPE for each project. All PPE required at a site (excluding personnel items of clothing) will be paid for by ENVIRON. HSCs will maintain appropriate PPE supplies for each ENVIRON facility. If special PPE is required for a site visit, employees should check with the Host facility to see if appropriate PPE will be provided. If Host facility does not provide PPE, employees should seek guidance from the local HSC.

7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Training Employees who use PPE must know: When PPE is needed. What PPE is needed. How to properly put on, wear, adjust, and take off PPE. Useful life and limitations of PPE. How to properly care for, maintain, and dispose of PPE.

8 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M PPE Can Protect Against... Eye Injuries Head Injuries Skin Injuries Hand Injuries Food Injuries

9 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Eye Safety Common Reasons for Eye Injuries: Not being aware of potential eye hazards Not using protective eyewear Using the wrong type of eyewear for the hazard

10 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Eye Safety General Hazards Flying objects, such as wood, metal, stone, or sparks. Splashes from hazardous chemicals, acids, and other corrosives or hot metals. Dusts, fumes, mists, gases, and vapors. Swinging objects such as ropes and chains. Electrical arcing and sparks. Radiant energy from welding and cutting or operations that use ultraviolet or infrared light.

11 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Eye Safety OSHA Requirements When the risk is flying objects, OSHA requires eye coverings (such as safety glasses) that protect the eyes from the side as well as from the front. When the risk is light radiation, OSHA offers a detailed chart that matches degree of radiation with the type of filter lenses needed to provide protection. When risk is exposure to eyes or face from flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustic liquids, chemical gases or vapors, or potentially injurious light radiation, workers must use appropriate protection such as vented goggles.

12 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Head Safety Common Reasons for Head Injuries Falling or flying objects Bumping your head on or against something Electricity

13 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Head Protection Hard hats are designed to resist blows to the head and to absorb the shock of the blow. The one-piece outer shell takes the blow. The cradle lining attached to the headband acts as a cushion that absorbs the shock. The space between the shell and your head takes the shock. Head Safety

14 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Four Classes of Hard Hats: Class A: usually found in a manufacturing environment, primarily designed to protect the head against impact, classified as having limited voltage resistance, water-resistant and slow burning. Class B: designed for work with electricity, classified as having high-voltage resistance (have no metal parts and will not conduct electricity), water-resistant and slow-burning. Class C: sometimes used in manufacturing and offer no voltage protection, and are usually made of aluminum. Class D: designed for use by firefighters, will not conduct electricity and are fire-resistant. Head Safety

15 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Fitting a Hard Hat Headbands are adjustable and should fit so that the hat does not touch the head. Should not be worn over hats. Special hard-hat liners may be used to keep the head warm when working outdoors or in any cold environment. Head Safety

16 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Safety Procedures Hard hats should not be thrown around to avoid bangs and scrapes. Hard hats should be inspected daily for dents, cracks, etc. Hard hats should be replaced if a crack or hole is identified or if it has taken a heavy blow (even if no damage shows). Head Safety

17 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Head Safety Maintenance Procedures Clean your hard hat occasionally with hot soapy water, scrub, rinse, and dry. Store your hat avoiding sun and high heat. Leaving it on the back deck of your car is likely to deteriorate it over time.

18 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Skin Safety Common Reasons for Skin Injuries Flames, hot surfaces, electrical exposures, or exposures to corrosive substances. Cuts, bruises, and other wounds from tools or flying objects that can let bacteria in to the skin and lead to infections. Frostbite resulting from exposure to cold.

19 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Skin Safety Identifying Skin Hazards Check to see if a substance has the potential to cause skin irritation,skin burns, or other reactions by reading the label or MSDS. If equipment is hot, assume a burn hazard. If temperatures are low, protect against cold. When dressing for a site visit, use common sense to keep from exposing skin to risk

20 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Skin Safety Safety Procedures Follow instructions for handling, storage, and transport. Keep chemical containers closed when not in use. Use substances only where ventilation is good. Bandage small scrapes or cuts before putting on gloves or protective clothing. Change work clothes, including underwear, every day and wash clothes separately from street clothes. Inform your supervisor of any pre-existing skin conditions (acne, eczema, or allergies) prior to visiting a site. Report skin reactions that develop on the job.

21 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Cleaning Skin Keep bathrooms and shower areas clean to keep contamination from spreading. Wash promptly and thoroughly after working with hazardous substances, even if there was no direct contact and you wore gloves. Do not use solvents or industrial detergents to clean your hands; they can create skin problems of their own. Skin Safety

22 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Safety Procedures for Burns & Cuts: If you get a minor burn, soak it in cold water and then put on a sterile bandage. If it blisters or chars, get medical attention. If your skin is cut, wash with soap and warm water and cover with a sterile bandage. If the cut is large or bleeds heavily, get medical attention. Skin Safety

23 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Skin Safety Safety Procedures for Chemical Exposure Wash exposed skin thoroughly with lots of soap and water for at least 15 minutes. If clothing was exposed to the hazardous substance, try to remove it while wearing gloves so you do not have any additional skin contact with the substance.

24 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Hand Safety Common Reasons for Hand Injuries Contact injuries, skin diseases or burns. Carpal tunnel syndrome (results from doing the same movement over and over again with the wrists and hands). Traumatic injuries ranging from cuts and punctures to broken bones or, the worst case, amputation. Severed nerves, tendons, or ligaments.

25 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Safety Procedures Follow manufacturer’s and company’s instructions for using tools and equipment. Feed materials into moving machinery with a push stick, not hand. Keep hands away form moving machine parts. Always cut away from your body. Use brushes, not hands, to sweep up metal or wood chips. Check materials for sharp edges, burrs, splinters, etc. before handling them. Hand Safety

26 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Safety Procedures (cont.) Make sure you know how hot or cold an object is before handling it. Wipe off greasy or slippery objects before handling them. Lift an object so your hands are not near the pinch points. Keep fingers on the sides, not the top or bottom, of spacers when stacking materials. Put materials down carefully so you do not mash fingers. Use the right tool for the job and use it correctly. Store tools so no sharp edges are exposed. Pass, don’t throw, tools to other workers handle first. Hand Safety

27 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Safety Procedures: Gloves For heat or cold, wear insulated gloves (leather may be all right for heat). For radiant heat, choose a reflective fabric. For electricity, wear special insulated rubber gloves. For corrosives, wear neoprene or nitrile rubber gloves. Do not store your gloves inside out. Chemicals can be trapped in the glove and deteriorate it. Hand Safety

28 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Foot Safety Common Reasons for Foot Injuries Heavy falling objects Heavy rolling objects Stubbing or banging toes

29 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Foot Safety General Hazards Wet surfaces Electricity Nails or other sharp objects that could puncture shoes

30 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Protection Using Shoes Metal insoles or reinforced soles protect against puncture. Non-conducting soles (no nails in the shoes) if you work with electricity. Rubber boots or shoes or leather shoes with wooden soles if you work in wet conditions. Heat-resistant soles if you work in “hot” areas. Easy-to-remove “gaiters” if you could get splashed by hot metal or by welding sparks. Impermeable rubber or neoprene boots to wear over or instead of work boots if you work with corrosives or hazardous chemicals. Foot Safety

31 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Safety Procedures Wear a sturdy shoe with low heels and non-skid soles. Do not wear sandals or old worn down shoes. Make sure that shoes fit, are the right size, and comfortable to wear. Foot Safety

32 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M PPE Maintenance All forms of protection must be provided, used, and maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition. It must be of safe design and construction for the work to be performed. “Defective or damaged personal protective equipment shall not be used.” Report any damaged or defective PPE to your supervisor and HSC immediately.

33 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT / E N V I R O N T R A I N I N G P R O G R A M Summary Any employee who may be exposed to impact, penetration, radiation, heat, chemical, or other hazard is required to wear PPE when an engineering solution (ventilation, guarding, etc…) can not be found.


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