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DON’T FEAR SHAKESPEARE Demystifying Will’s Words.

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Presentation on theme: "DON’T FEAR SHAKESPEARE Demystifying Will’s Words."— Presentation transcript:

1 DON’T FEAR SHAKESPEARE Demystifying Will’s Words

2 When you first read a play by Shakespeare, his language seems VERY STRANGE. But once you catch on to some of the ways Shakespeare is using English, it will begin to make more and more sense. YOU MAY EVEN START TO LIKE IT!! It won’t ever be easy but the more you read it, the more you’ll start to understand.

3 Most of the time you are reading POETRY. Shakespeare didn’t speak poetry when he was walking around London on his daily errands, but characters onstage in Shakespeare’s time almost always spoke in VERSE. Some of Shakespeare’s verse has a familiar type of RHYME and RHYTHM: Mary had a little lamb. London Bridge is falling down. Double, double, toil and trouble, Fire burn and cauldron bubble. Macbeth

4 Iambic Pentameter – 5 beats per line, 10 syllables per line Most of the time, Shakespeare’s poetry has a different kind of pattern. Much of his poetry doesn’t rhyme, but follows a very steady BEAT. Da DUH da DUH da DUH da DUH da DUH How can these things in me seem scorn to you?

5 It’s pretty amazing when you start to feel the beat going on and on … Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon Who is already sick and pale with grief That thou, her maid, art far more fair than she.

6 The Beat Goes On!! Try these – Count the syllables; find the beat. My mistress with a monster is in love. A Midsummer Night’s Dream If music be the food of love, play on. Twelfth Night Come not between a dragon and his wrath. King Lear

7 The beat/syllable pattern is the reason that most of Shakespeare’s lines look like this: HAMLET: To be, or not to be? That is the question Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And, by opposing, end them? To die, to sleep— No more—and by a sleep to say we end The heartache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to—’tis a consummation Devoutly to be wished! To die, to sleep. To sleep, perchance to dream—

8 Instead of this: HAMLET: To be, or not to be? That is the question— Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles, and, by opposing, end them? To die, to sleep—no more— and by a sleep to say we end the heartache and the thousand natural shocks that flesh is heir to— ’tis a consummation devoutly to be wished! To die, to sleep. To sleep, perchance to dream—

9 The beat pattern – called the meter Is the reason that a character’s lines may start way over from the left margin. Two characters may share one 5 beat line: POLONIUS: Mad for thy love? OPHELIA: My lord I do not know.

10 Read period to period (or semi-colon) instead of stopping at the end of a line There had she not been long but she became  A joyful mother of two goodly sons; And, which was strange, this one so like the other  As could not be distinguish’d but by names. -Comedy of Errors Also, if you read outloud, the meaning will come a little easier. Remember, Shakespeare wrote these lines as SCRIPTS – lines were meant to be SPOKEN.

11 Since Shakespeare’s day, many words have changed. How? Words we don’t use anymore: Who would fardels bear? The scrimers of their nation He galls his kibe Words that look the same but have different meanings : I could fancy (like) more than any other Examine well your blood (lineage) He’s as tall (brave) as any man in Illyria

12 Shakespeare knew a lot of words. Shakespeare’s vocabulary was 30,000 words. The average person today uses 15,000 words. He also created many NEW WORDS and played around with puns and other wordplay. Some words first used in his plays: assassinationreliance obscenepremeditate dislocateaccomodation

13 Shakespeare liked to play around with the ORDER of words. He rearranged words: That handkerchief Did an Egyptian to my mother give. He omitted words and letters: over = o’er I’ll to England. Why? Sometimes to make the words fit 5 beats; sometimes to fit the rhyme; sometimes just because it sounds good that way!

14 Shakespeare – Nothing to fear!

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