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UO Supplement to Preventing Workplace Harassment To Access this course, enter today’s date. Forward through the pages using the “next” button at the bottom.

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Presentation on theme: "UO Supplement to Preventing Workplace Harassment To Access this course, enter today’s date. Forward through the pages using the “next” button at the bottom."— Presentation transcript:

1 UO Supplement to Preventing Workplace Harassment To Access this course, enter today’s date. Forward through the pages using the “next” button at the bottom of the page. Comprehension exercises are distributed throughout the course. The following slide will provide the correct answer, with explanation. You must complete all pages in the course. Fill out the form on the last slide and hit the “submit” button. Please print and refer to the UO Guide to the United Educators “Preventing Harassment in the Workplace”, [hyperlink], as indicated. Discrimination Free Workplace: A Shared Responsibility

2 UO Specific Supplement Table of Contents UO Policy on Prohibited Discrimination and UO Employee Duty to Report (slides 4-21) – Why reporting is important – What to report – definitions of terms – Overview – Practice scenarios Duty to Report Challenges – Supporting a Student or Employee (slides 22-29) – Managing the conversation about reporting obligation – Model language for course syllabi and other communications Prohibited Discrimination – Unique Circumstances (slides 30-44) – Off-campus activities – Social media – Practice scenarios Romantic Relationships with Students (slides 45-63) – UO policy – NCAA model policy – Practice scenarios UO Grievance Processes (slides 64-70) Contacts and Resources (slides 71-73)

3 UO Specific Supplement Preventing Workplace Harassment Objectives of the UO Specific Supplement 1.Clarify UO employees’ DUTY TO REPORT information regarding prohibited discrimination, discriminatory harassment and sexual harassment.* * Referred to as “discrimination” or “prohibited discrimination and sexual harassment” throughout this module. 2. Help employees recognize when discrimination, is occurring. 3.Identify UO policy and related grievance processes. 4.Increase awareness of the UO policy regarding sexual and romantic relationships between employees and the students they oversee to clarify the potential for such relationships to raise issues of unlawful discrimination.

4 Prohibited Discrimination and Sexual Harassment UO Employee Duty to Report UO Policy states: “University employees with credible evidence that any form of prohibited discrimination* is occurring have the responsibility to inform their supervisors or the Office of Affirmative Action.” * UO policy prohibits discrimination and harassment consistent with applicable state and federal law. Please refer to UO Guide to United Educators “Preventing Harassment in the Workplace” for specific information.

5 Prohibited Discrimination – Why Is Reporting Important? Prohibited discrimination and sexual harassment interfere with learning and productive work, create potential legal liability, and negatively impact the university’s reputation. Prohibited discrimination and sexual harassment harm:  members of our community who are directly or indirectly affected by such behavior, and  the institution.

6 Prohibited Discrimination – Why Is Reporting Important? The University continues to receive reports of prohibited discrimination and sexual harassment, despite long-standing informational efforts. Reported concerns have involved behavior by employees at all levels, including graduate teaching fellows, and students. There has been a significant increase in the number of reported incidents of student-on-student sexual violence, due in part to greater coordination among UO offices.  Studies have shown that 20-25% of female students and 6% of male students experience an attempted or completed sexual assault while in college.

7 Duty to Report “Credible Evidence” What Does That Mean? Credible evidence about discrimination is: Information of the sort you would rely on in making important personal or business decisions that leads you to believe that a student, employee or visitor to the University is being negatively impacted by the behavior of others, AND The behavior appears to be based on or related to personal characteristics that are protected under the law.

8 Duty to Report When Prohibited Discrimination “Is Occurring” Information regarding prohibited discrimination or sexual harassment must be reported when the behavior:  Is currently occurring, OR  Occurred recently and is just now coming to your attention, OR  Occurred while anyone involved was affiliated with the University of Oregon, even though it is just now coming to your attention

9 University of Oregon Policy Prohibited Discrimination Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination on the basis of sex. Sexual harassment includes all forms of sexual violence, including  Sexual assault  Partner or dating violence  Gender-based stalking and bullying

10 Prohibited Discrimination Employee Duty to Report Overview DISCRIMINATION, DISCRIMINATORY HARASSMENT, SEXUAL HARASSMENT Who must reportAll Employees Where to report Supervisor, OR Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (OAAEO) When to reportAs soon as possible, when you have credible evidence that prohibited discrimination or discriminatory harassment, including sexual harassment, are occurring. Why you must report Required by UO policy. Failure to report limits UO ability to provide discrimination-free environment for its members. Failure to report when required is a performance issue, and could potentially result in personal liability. Additional informationPenny Daugherty, Director of OAAEO and Title IX Coordinator OAAEO,

11 Duty to Report – In Practice It isn’t always easy to recognize the duty to report in the moment when information first becomes known. Behaviors that raise issues of possible discrimination include, but are not limited to: Behaviors that belittle or demean groups of individuals based on race, religion, age, disability or any other protected status; Behaviors that treat members of a protected group differently and less favorably than others; Unwelcome attention of a sexual nature, whether verbal or physical. The following scenarios, all of them drawn from actual situations reported at the University of Oregon, provide an opportunity to think about the kinds of issues that you may encounter.

12 Scenario 1: Student workgroup In a male dominated field, Katie complains that in one of her classes students are expected to work in groups but she has found that she is unwelcome in the male-dominated workgroups. She finds that her contributions are frequently dismissed by other members of the group but positively received when the same contributions are later presented by a male student. ****************************************** Does the reported behavior raise issues that require reporting under UO policy? Yes □ No □ Maybe □

13 Duty to Report Scenarios Scenario 1: Student workgroup discussion Yes, this behavior raises an issue of possible discrimination on the basis of sex that must be reported. If the report was from a non- traditional age student, or a student wearing a hijab or other headscarf, the behavior would raise an issue of possible discrimination on the basis of age, religion or national origin.

14 Scenario 2: A friendly swat on the butt You observe on-the-job behavior between two employees in which George playfully swats the butt of his co-worker with a file folder. The co-worker laughs, but in a way that just seems “off”. You don’t know whether the behavior was welcome of not. *************************************** Does this behavior raise issues that require reporting under UO policy? Yes □ No □ Maybe □

15 Duty to Report Scenarios Scenario 2: Friendly swat on the butt discussion Yes, this behavior raises issues of possible sexual harassment, regardless of the sex of the two co-workers. This behavior would also require reporting under the Clery Act. For more information, see: -clery-crimes -clery-crimes

16 Scenario 3: Office hours You learn that a junior colleague has begun holding office hours at a local coffee shop outside of regular work hours. You are aware that some students are uncomfortable attending office hours at that location and other students are beginning to question what is going on between the faculty member and students observed at the coffee shop. *************************************** Does this reported behavior raise any issues that require reporting under UO policy? Yes □ No □ Maybe □

17 Duty to Report Scenarios Scenario 3: Office hours discussion No. Holding office hours outside of traditional times and locations does not, by itself, raise issues of discrimination or harassment. The behavior must be reported under UO policy if: 1)the location/time of office hours is different for some students, based on protected status, or 2)the nature of the behavior during office hours raises issues of protected status or harassment. However, if some students, as a result of their discomfort, avoid taking advantage of office hours, they are being deprived of the full academic benefits of the class. That is problematic for the student, the faculty member and the department, and should be addressed

18 Scenario 4: Personal cards and gifts A male staff member complains that a co-worker has been leaving him cards with personal messages and small gifts. He is not interested in having a personal relationship with the co-worker and has asked the co-worker to stop, but the behavior has continued. The unwanted attention is causing others in the workplace to speculate about his relationship with the co-worker. ****************************************** Does the reported behavior raise issues that require reporting under UO policy? Yes □ No □ Maybe □

19 Duty to Report Scenarios Scenario 4: Personal cards and gifts discussion Yes, where the behavior is unwelcome, the co- worker has asked that it stop, and it is raising questions about a personal or romantic relationship, the behavior raises an issue of possible sexual harassment that must be reported under UO policy.

20 Scenario 5: Sexual assault A student enrolled in your class (or working in your office) confides that she was sexually assaulted by another UO student. The reporting student insists she just needed to share the information with someone, and does not want you to do anything further. *************************************** Does this reported behavior raise issues that require reporting under UO policy? Yes □ No □ Maybe □

21 Duty to Report Scenarios Scenario 5: Sexual assault discussion Yes, the incident must be reported under UO policy.

22 Duty to Report Challenges Supporting a Student or Employee The duty to report can feel uncomfortable, especially when a student or employee wants to share information in confidence. You might hear: “Something happened to me that I need to share with someone. I don’t want you to do anything; I just want someone to know. Please don’t tell anyone.”

23 Duty to Report Challenges Supporting a Student or Employee You can:  Be understanding – listen carefully, acknowledge and don’t minimize the student’s experience.  Direct the student to offices that can help and offer greater confidentiality than you can. (UO Counseling and Testing Center or UO Health Center)  Assure the student that you will not tell anyone you don’t have to.  Make students aware in advance that you are a mandatory reporter and must report credible evidence of discrimination. You can put this information on your class syllabus, petition form or application, and on your door or electronic notice board.

24 Duty to Report Challenges Supporting a Student or Employee You cannot:  Promise confidentiality. You must, if discrimination, harassment, or sexual violence are revealed:  Report the information to your supervisor or the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity.

25 Duty to Report Challenges Supporting a Student or Employee While you need to conduct the discussion in your own words, here are suggestions for framing the conversation:  Be welcoming  I’m glad you came to me. I’ll do what I can to help.  Be transparent  Before you share any details, I need to tell you that, as a University employee, I’m a mandatory reporter. That means that even though I would like to just listen, I can’t promise you confidentiality. If what you share involves discrimination, harassment or sexual violence of any kind, I have to report it.

26 Duty to Report Challenges Supporting a Student or Employee Suggested language, cont’d.  Suggest resources  The Health Center and the Counseling and Testing Center have a greater ability to work with you confidentially, and I can help you arrange an appointment.  Encourage efforts to get assistance  Whatever is on your mind, I encourage you to share it so that someone can assist you. The University takes seriously its responsibility to protect its students.  Confirm student or employee wants to talk  Do you feel comfortable speaking to me, knowing that I might have a duty to report?  Check on student’s or employee’s well-being  Before you leave, I want to make sure you are alright.

27 Duty to Report Challenges Supporting a Student or Employee For additional assistance or coaching with these conversations, contact:  Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity at , or  Office of the Dean of Students at

28 Duty to Report Be Transparent in Notice to Students Including language on course syllabi, notice boards, petitions, applications and other documents that advises students of UO employees’ duty to report will make students aware that providing certain information may trigger a report and follow up by the University.

29 Duty to Report Be Transparent in Notice to Students Suggested language for syllabi, notice boards and other documents: I support Title IX and have a duty to report relevant information. The UO is committed to providing an environment free of all forms of prohibited discrimination and sexual harassment, including sexual assault, domestic and dating violence and gender-based stalking. Any UO employee who becomes aware that such behavior is occurring has a duty to report that information to their supervisor or the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity The University Health Center and University Counseling and Testing Center can provide assistance and have a greater ability to work confidentially with students.

30 Prohibited Discrimination and Duty to Report Apply to All University Activities Many university sponsored programs and activities such as study abroad, service learning programs, student organization activities and club sports take place at non- campus locations. The University’s policy regarding prohibited discrimination and UO employees’ duty to report still apply.

31 Prohibited Discrimination/Duty to Report Off-Campus University Sponsored Activities UO employees who plan and lead off-campus activities should take the following steps: Advise students involved in such programs and activities about relevant policies, including the UO policy prohibiting discrimination and sexual harassment. Inform students how to report incidents of possible discrimination or sexual harassment, including the option to report via or other electronic communication. Ensure that UO personnel involved with the activities understand they are required to report information regarding discrimination.

32 Prohibited Discrimination/Duty to Report Off-Campus University Sponsored Activities Important steps in preparing for off-campus activities (cont’d): Volunteers are not specifically required by UO policy to report evidence of discrimination. However, those who oversee programs with volunteers should establish a culture within their programs in which issues of possible discrimination or sexual harassment are regularly reported so they can be addressed, minimizing the potential negative impact on the program or activity.

33 Prohibited Discrimination and Duty to Report Apply to Social Media Harassment, regardless of the motivation and whether or not it is related to protected status, can cause serious physical and emotional harm. Communication, whether oral or in writing and in any form of electronic media*, that disparages, ridicules, or physically threatens a person based on any form of protected status may constitute discriminatory harassment under UO policy. ** *Texts, tweets, Snap Chat, YouTube, and any other forms of social media transmitting the written or spoken word. **Harassment should be addressed, whether or not it raises issues of discrimination.

34 Prohibited Discrimination and Duty to Report Apply to Social Media  Behavior via social media that takes place in the UO workplace or learning environment is subject to the UO policy regarding prohibited discrimination and sexual harassment in the same manner as other forms of workplace or learning environment behavior.  Communication via social media, even when that communication takes place outside of the UO workplace or learning environment, can be subject to the UO policy regarding prohibited discrimination and sexual harassment, particularly where the communication impacts the workplace or learning environment.

35 Prohibited Discrimination and Duty to Report Apply to Social Media  If you become aware of behavior on social media that leads you to have credible evidence that prohibited discrimination that involves the university is occurring, you have a duty to report that information, just as you do any other credible information that prohibited discrimination or sexual harassment are occurring.

36 Social Media and Off-Campus Activities Duty to Report in Practice While off-campus activities and social media are unique circumstances, an employee’s duty to report when there is credible evidence of possible discrimination remains the same. Behaviors that raise issues of possible discrimination include, but are not limited to: Behaviors that belittle or demean groups of individuals based on race, religion, age, disability or any other protected status, regardless of the form of the behavior; Behaviors that treat members of a protected group differently and less favorably than others; Unwelcome attention of a sexual nature, whether verbal or physical. The following scenarios provide an opportunity to think about issues that may arise with respect to social media and off- campus activities.

37 Social Media and Off-Campus Activities Practice Scenarios Scenario 1: Facebook harassment An employee believes that he was overlooked for promotion because of his disability and files a grievance against his supervisor. Other employees learn about his grievance and start writing nasty messages on Facebook, calling him demeaning names based on his disability. Does this reported behavior raise issues that require reporting under UO policy: □ Yes □ No □ Maybe

38 Social Media and Off-Campus Activities Practice Scenarios Scenario 1: Facebook harassment discussion Yes, the reported behavior raises an issue of discrimination on the basis of disability. Even if the message board is public, if we know that the board is being accessed at work and know employees are posting inappropriate messages, we would have a duty to take steps to stop the harassment.

39 Social Media and Off-Campus Activities Practice Scenarios Scenario 2: Cell phone pornography An employee uses his personal cell phone to show pornographic pictures to a co-worker at the worksite, during break. Does this reported behavior raise issues that require reporting under UO policy: □ Yes □ No □ Maybe

40 Social Media and Off-Campus Activities Practice Scenarios Scenario 2: Cell phone pornography discussion Yes, the fact the employee used a personal cell phone to display pornographic pictures at the worksite has the same impact as posting hard copy pictures in the workplace, and would be addressed no differently than posting hard copy pictures.

41 Social Media and Off-Campus Activities Practice Scenarios Scenario 3: Off-campus taunting You hear that while traveling to a football game at another campus, members of the band engaged in behavior that involved taunting the other schools’ cheerleaders. Does this reported behavior raise issues that require reporting under UO policy: □ Yes □ No □ Maybe

42 Social Media and Off-Campus Activities Practice Scenarios Scenario 3: Off-campus taunting Maybe. Whether or not the behavior must be reported under UO policy depends on whether the band members were: 1) taunting select members of the cheerleading squad, based on protected status, or 2) taunting all members of the squad regardless of protected status, and 3) whether the nature of the taunting raised issues of protected status. Even if the behavior did not constitute prohibited discrimination, it is inappropriate and should be addressed.

43 Social Media and Off-Campus Activities Practice Scenarios Scenario 4: Travel abroad sexual violence You learn that a UO student enrolled in a program at an international site has reported that she was sexually assaulted. Does this reported behavior raise issues that requires reporting under UO policy? □ Yes □ No □ Maybe

44 Social Media and Off-Campus Activities Practice Scenarios Scenario 4: Travel abroad sexual violence discussion Yes, the behavior must be reported under UO policy. The university may have limited authority to address the offending behavior. However, the university has a responsibility to do whatever it can to address the situation and provide support and resources to the affected student.

45 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students UO policy: No faculty or staff member should initiate or acquiesce in/agree to a sexual or romantic relationship with a student who is supervised or evaluated by the faculty or staff member. Why? Such a relationship is inherently unequal given the power difference involved. It can involve a conflict of interest, an abuse of power, compromised judgment and impaired objectivity. When relationships are unequal, the concept of “mutual consent” becomes questionable.

46 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students In matters between faculty or staff members and students over whom they have evaluative authority, it is the responsibility of the faculty or staff member -- the party with greater power -- to maintain appropriate professional boundaries. Professional boundaries are those that:  Establish limits that allow for safe and comfortable connections between faculty/staff members and the students in their classes or workplaces.  Are friendly and supportive, but not over-involved.  Don’t ask or require that personal information be shared unless it is relevant to the classroom or workplace.  Remain focused on professional responsibilities to the student, whether in the classroom or the workplace.

47 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students If a faculty/staff member becomes romantically involved with a student over whom the faculty/staff member has evaluative authority, the faculty/staff member has a duty to: 1)report the relationship to his/her department head or the OAAEO, and 2)make prompt, appropriate arrangements to mitigate the apparent or actual conflict of interest.

48 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Given the significant power differential, relationships between faculty/staff and students can lead to complex, unexpected and problematic outcomes, whether or not an evaluative or supervisory relationship exists. Outcomes can include: questions about whether a relationships is consensual, and possible claims of discrimination on the basis of sex, including sexual harassment.

49 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Although unintended, there is a high potential for such relationships to interfere with the ability of students to pursue their educational and work goals.  The involved student may become sufficiently distracted to have the relationship interfere with his/her academic work.  Other students or workers who are aware of the relationship may become uncomfortable or perceive they are being treated unfairly, potentially isolating the involved student and interfering with the educational opportunity of all affected students.

50 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Consequences of sexual or romantic relationships with students, whether intended or not, that negatively impact a student’s ability to fully participate and enjoy the benefits of his/her educational program raise the possibility of a violation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of Title IX requires that no person, on the basis of sex, shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.

51 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students UO policy allows formal complaints related to romantic relationships between faculty or staff and students over whom they have evaluative authority. Complaints can be filed by:  The student involved in the relationship.  Third parties, also subject to the evaluative authority of the faculty/staff member, who believe they were injured or prejudiced as a result of the relationship.

52 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students In its Model Policy to Prevent Inappropriate Relationships Between Student-Athletes and Athletics Department Personnel, the NCAA argues that sexual or romantic relationships between a student-athlete and a coach, or other athletics staff with supervisory responsibility over the student- athlete, constitute sexual abuse in sport, even where both participants in the relationship claim to consent to the relationship. (Emphasis added) For more information, see

53 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Scenario: Quinn, a mature junior, engages in a consensual romantic relationship with Casey Jones, a faculty member in the department in which Quinn is a major. Because the relationship began in the final two weeks of the class in which Quinn was enrolled, Casey did not report the relationship or make arrangements to mitigate any conflict of interest.

54 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Ending 1: The relationship is wonderful for six months, at which time there is messy and dramatic breakup that leaves Quinn feeling deeply hurt.

55 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Ending 1: Which of the following are potential outcomes of Ending 1 of the Quinn/Casey relationship (check all that apply): 1. □ Nothing. There are no violations of UO policy. 2. □ Quinn begins to question whether the relationship with Casey was consensual because Casey first engaged in romantic overtures shortly before final projects were due. Quinn recalls having an uneasy feeling about what could happen if s/he declined those advances. Quinn raises that concern with OAAEO. 3. □ Another student from the class files a complaint alleging that he was disadvantaged as a result of the relationship between Quinn and Casey.

56 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Ending 1: Given Quinn’s questions about whether the relationship was consensual (Outcome 2), it is possible that Quinn may file a complaint against Casey alleging sexual harassment. A student who was enrolled in the class during which Quinn and Casey became romantically involved who feels disadvantaged as a result of the relationship (Outcome 3), would have standing to file a complaint alleging a violation of the Conflicts of Interest policy.

57 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Ending 2: The relationship is wonderful for six months, at which time Quinn realizes that s/he is not interested in continuing the relationship. S/he informs Casey that the relationship is over. Casey acknowledges Quinn’s wishes, but continues to send s and to invite Quinn to coffee. Quinn asks Casey to stop; Casey says s/he understands, but still sends s.

58 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Ending 2: Which of the following are potential outcomes of Ending 2 of the Quinn/Casey relationship (check all that apply): 1. □ Quinn complains to OAAEO that s/he is being sexually harassed by Casey. 2. □ The department head learns of the relationship from a friend of Quinn’s who is now uncomfortable about enrolling in a required class that Casey teaches. 3. □ On being called in by the department head, Casey states that s/he wants to file a grievance against Quinn for engaging in behavior that seduced Casey into the relationship.

59 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Ending 2: Outcomes 1 and 2 are entirely possible given the facts of Ending 2. The student who is a friend of Quinn’s and is now uncomfortable about enrolling in a required course Casey is teaching may not have standing to file a complaint, but her concern raises an issue for the department. While Casey might feel that s/he was seduced by Quinn, as the person with greater power, Casey had responsibility for maintaining appropriate boundaries. As a result, Casey has no basis for a complaint against Quinn.

60 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Ending 3: The relationship between Casey and Quinn proves wonderful and long-lasting. Quinn continues to be a student in the department, but takes care not to enroll in any of Casey’s classes. As a result, the relationship is not reported. The department head becomes suspicious on seeing Casey and Quinn interacting at a non-department event in a romantic manner.

61 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Ending 3: Which of the following are potential outcomes of Ending 3 of the Quinn/Casey relationship (check all that apply): 1. □ Nothing. There are no violations of UO policy. 2. □ The department head approaches Casey to ask about the relationship. Casey feels that since s/he and Quinn have taken care to avoid an evaluative relationship, there is nothing to report. 3. □ Other students in the department who were friends of Quinn’s are no longer comfortable hanging out with Quinn, since they feel that anything they share with Quinn may get reported back to Casey.

62 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students Ending 3: Outcomes 2 and 3 and possible outcomes. Even though Quinn may be careful to avoid Casey’s courses, Quinn is still a student in the same department and there may be evaluative authority outside of the classroom context. Quinn may also be academically disadvantaged by the relationship. In an effort to avoid a conflict, s/he has been deprived of access to all of the department’s course offerings. Quinn may also miss opportunities for academic engagement with other students who are uncomfortable with the relationship. As a result, there may still be a policy violation.

63 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power: Sexual and Romantic Relationships with Students The University of Oregon policy specifically addresses the issue of relationships between faculty/staff members and students over whom they have evaluative authority. The same principles apply to relationships between supervisors and the employees they supervise.

64 Prohibited Discrimination UO Grievance Processes The University of Oregon offers both informal and formal options for resolving concerns about prohibited discrimination and sexual harassment. The Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity serves as a designated resource for members of the university community with concerns about possible discrimination or sexual harassment.

65 Prohibited Discrimination UO Grievance Processes Formal grievance processes for addressing prohibited discrimination or sexual harassment are available to faculty, staff and students. The appropriate process is determined by the relationship to the university of both the person with the concern and the person whose behavior is causing the concern. The OAAEO can assist with identifying the appropriate process.

66 Prohibited Discrimination UO Grievance Processes An informal grievance process typically involves fairly formalized steps that include all or some of the following:  Creating a record;  Meeting with the alleged offender and his/her supervisor;  Clearly identifying expectations for future behavior; and  Notice that future inappropriate behavior will result in further corrective action.

67 Prohibited Discrimination UO Formal Grievance Processes - Students Students with concerns about behaviors by students: formal process is through Student Conduct and Community Standards in the Office of the Dean of Students. Students with concerns about behaviors by employees: formal process is through the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity

68 Prohibited Discrimination UO Formal Grievance Processes - GTFs Graduate Teaching Fellows: are both students and employees. Their formal recourse for concerns about prohibited discrimination or sexual harassment depends on whether the behavior of concern occurred in their role:  As a student: formal recourse is through Student Conduct and Community Standards in the Office of the Dean of Students.  As a GTF: formal recourse is through the GTFF Collective Bargaining Agreement grievance process.

69 Prohibited Discrimination UO Formal Grievance Processes - Employees Represented Employees with concerns regarding behavior by UO employees: formal process is through the collective bargaining agreement grievance process. Unrepresented Employees with concerns regarding behavior by UO employees: formal process is through the Faculty Grievance Process. All Employees with concerns regarding behavior by UO students: formal process is through Student Conduct and Community Standards.

70 Conflicts of Interest and Abuses of Power Policy UO Formal Complaint Process Parties who can bring a formal complaint include:  a student who was involved in a relationship with a faculty/staff member who had evaluative authority over the student, AND  third parties, also in an evaluative relationship with the faculty/staff member, who feel they have been injured or prejudiced by the relationship The complaint process is administered by the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity

71 Prohibited Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Contacts ISSUEAppropriate Contact Title IX CoordinatorPenelope Daugherty OAAEO Prohibited discrimination and sexual harassment OAAEO Required employee reportingOAAEO UO protocol for responding to issues of sexual harassment and sexual violence OAAEO

72 Prohibited Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Contacts ISSUEAppropriate Contact Student Conduct CodePaul Shang, Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students Director Student Conduct and Community Standards Services and resources for student survivors of sexual harassment and violence Paul Shang, Assistant Vice President and Dean of Students Sheryl Eyster, Associate Dean of Students

73 Prohibited Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Relevant Resources ResourceLocation Overview of OAAEO Services and Complaint and Grievance Procedures Click on Prohibited Discrimination UO Protocol for Responding to Incidents of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault Involving Students Click on Sexual Harassment Sexual or Romantic Relationships with Students Preventing Inappropriate Relationships Between Student-Athletes and Athletics Department Personnel iles/images/Staying%20in%20Bounds.p dfhttp://www.nacwaa.org/sites/default/f iles/images/Staying%20in%20Bounds.p df.


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