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Climate Change Impacts in the United States Third National Climate Assessment [Name] [Date] Water.

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Presentation on theme: "Climate Change Impacts in the United States Third National Climate Assessment [Name] [Date] Water."— Presentation transcript:

1 Climate Change Impacts in the United States Third National Climate Assessment [Name] [Date] Water

2 Water Convening Lead Authors – Aris Georgakakos, Georgia Institute of Technology – Paul Fleming, Seattle Public Utilities Lead Authors – Michael Dettinger, U.S. Geological Survey – Christa Peters-Lidard, National Aeronautics and Space Administration – Terese (T.C.) Richmond, Van Ness Feldman, LLP – Ken Reckhow, Duke University – Kathleen White, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – David Yates, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

3 Changing Rain, Snow, and Runoff Annual precipitation and river-flow increases are observed now in the Midwest and the Northeast regions. Very heavy precipitation events have increased nationally and are projected to increase in all regions. The length of dry spells is projected to increase in most areas, especially the southern and northwestern portions of the contiguous United States.

4 Projected Changes in Snow, Runoff, and Soil Moisture Figure source: Cayan et al. 2013

5 Annual Surface Soil Moisture Trends Images provided by W. Dorigo

6 Seasonal Surface Soil Moisture Trends Images provided by W. Dorigo

7 Streamflow Projections for River Basins in the Western U.S. Source: U.S. Department of the Interior – Bureau of Reclamation 2011; Data provided by L. Brekke, S. Gangopadhyay, and T. Pruitt

8 Droughts Intensify Short-term (seasonal or shorter) droughts are expected to intensify in most U.S. regions. Longer-term droughts are expected to intensify in large areas of the Southwest, southern Great Plains, and Southeast.

9 Increased Risk of Flooding in Many Parts of the U.S. Flooding may intensify in many U.S. regions, even in areas where total precipitation is projected to decline.

10 Trends in Flood Magnitude Figure source: Peterson et al. 2013

11 Groundwater Availability Climate change is expected to affect water demand, groundwater withdrawals, and aquifer recharge, reducing groundwater availability in some areas.

12 Principal U.S. Groundwater Aquifers and Use Data from USGS 2005

13 Risks to Coastal Aquifers and Wetlands Sea level rise, storms and storm surges, and changes in surface and groundwater use patterns are expected to compromise the sustainability of coastal freshwater aquifers and wetlands.

14 Water Quality Risks to Lakes and Rivers Increasing air and water temperatures, more intense precipitation and runoff, and intensifying droughts can decrease river and lake water quality in many ways, including increases in sediment, nitrogen, and other pollutant loads.

15 Observed Changes in Lake Stratification and Ice Covered Area

16 Changes to Water Demand and Use Climate change affects water demand and the ways water is used within and across regions and economic sectors. The Southwest, Great Plains, and Southeast are particularly vulnerable to changes in water supply and demand.

17 U.S. Freshwater Withdrawal, Consumptive Use, and Population Trends

18 Freshwater Withdrawals by Sector Data from Kenny et al. 2009

19 U.S. Water Withdrawal Distribution Figure source: Georgia Water Resources Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology; Data from Kenny et al. 2009; 1 USGS 2013

20 Projected Changes in Water Withdrawals Figure source: Brown et al. 2013

21 Drought is Affecting Water Supplies Changes in precipitation and runoff, combined with changes in consumption and withdrawal, have reduced surface and groundwater supplies in many areas. These trends are expected to continue, increasing the likelihood of water shortages for many uses.

22 Flood Effects on People and Communities Increasing flooding risk affects human safety and health, property, infrastructure, economies, and ecology in many basins across the U.S.

23 Water Resources Management In most U.S. regions, water resources managers and planners will encounter new risks, vulnerabilities, and opportunities that may not be properly managed within existing practices.

24 Water Challenges in a Southeast River Basin Figure source: Georgia Water Resources Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology

25 Adaptation Opportunities and Challenges Increasing resilience and enhancing adaptive capacity provide opportunities to strengthen water resources management and plan for climate change impacts. Many institutional, scientific, economic, and political barriers present challenges to implementing adaptive strategies.

26 Climate Change Impacts in the United States Third National Climate facebook.com/usgcrp #NCA2014 [Name & Contact Info]


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