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Objectives: Bellwork: 1. 2. group of four Objectives: RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly.

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Presentation on theme: "Objectives: Bellwork: 1. 2. group of four Objectives: RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly."— Presentation transcript:

1 Objectives: Bellwork: group of four Objectives: RL Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. RL Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). W Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. W Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Bellwork: 1. Grab two handouts 2. Sit in a group of four

2 In your group of 4… 1. Assign each group member a reading part: Mercutio Benvolio Tybalt Romeo 2. Begin to read Act III - up to line 130. Use a dictionary to help you!

3 Your Job… As we discuss the scene you just read, your job is to annotate important information on your copy of the reading.

4 What has happened?? Tybalt challenged Romeo Romeo tried to walk away Mercutio stepped in and fought Tybalt Romeo tried to break it up – stepped between Mercutio is killed Rome avenges Mercutio – kills Tybalt

5 Read lines What reason does Romeo have to love Tybalt?

6 ROMEO: Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee 59 Doth much excuse the appertaining rage To such a greeting: villain am I none; Therefore farewell; I see thou know'st me not. TYBALT: Boy, this shall not excuse the injuries That thou hast done me; therefore turn and draw. ROMEO: I do protest, I never injured thee, But love thee better than thou canst devise, Till thou shalt know the reason of my love: And so, good Capulet,--which name I tender As dearly as my own,--be satisfied. 69

7 What clues in the text help you to understand what Romeo means by the word “tender”? Circle your answer and be ready to share.

8 tender ROMEO: I do protest, I never injured thee, But love thee better than thou canst devise, Till thou shalt know the reason of my love: And so, good Capulet,--which name I tender As dearly as my own,--be satisfied. 69 “Dearly” implies to hold something dear, or to value it. This makes sense if you’ve heard the term “legal tender” when talking about money.

9 Read the exchange between Tybalt and Romeo. Does Romeo orignally want to fight Tybalt? Prove your answer with evidence from the text. “Therefore farewell; I see thou know'st me not.” “And so, good Capulet,--which name I tender As dearly as my own,--be satisfied.” “Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up.” “Draw, Benvolio; beat down their weapons. Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage!”

10 Tybalt address the following words to Romeo: TYBALT: O calm, dishonourable, vile submission! Alla stoccata carries it away. What is it that he finds dishonorable? He thinks Romeo’s calmness and “submission” is “vile” (meaning?) Therefore, he is ashamed of Romeo’s refusal to fight. What action does Mercutio think is honorable? Prove it. He thinks fighting is honorable – he fights with Tybalt!

11 Read lines Who is responsible for Mercutio’s injury? Underline words from the text to support your answer. Be ready to share. Now read lines Who does Mercutio say is responsible for his injury. Underline words from the text to support your answer. Be ready to share.

12 Who is responsible? Mercutio is responsible – he entered a fight not meant for him. “Tybalt, you rat-catcher, will you walk?” “make haste, lest mine [Mercutio’s sword] be about your ears [Tybalt’s ears] ere it be out.”

13 Who does Mercutio blame? He blames the two families (Montagues/Capulets), but in particular – Romeo. “A plague o'both your houses!” “Why the devil came you between us? I was hurt under your arm.”

14 Read lines grave MERCUTIO: No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church-door; but 'tis enough,'twill serve: ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. A plague o'both your houses! 'Zounds, a dog, a rat, a mouse, a cat, to scratch a man to death! a braggart, a rogue, a villain, that fights by the book of arithmetic! Why the devil came you between us? I was hurt under your arm.

15 Remember how we discussed Shakespeare’s ability to play with words (Collier, collar, choler)? The word “grave” can have several meanings. 1. Explain how Shakespeare uses two different meaning of the word in Mercutio’s speech. 2.Why does Mercutio chose this word to describe himself? Use evidence from the text to support your answer. Be ready to discuss. Grave: serious This violation of school rules is a grave matter. His carelessness could have grave consequences. They have placed themselves in grave danger. Grave: a place to put a dead body She placed flowers upon his grave.

16 Who does Romeo blame for Mercutio’s death? He blames Juliet! Why? Explain these lines to me… “O sweet Juliet, Thy beauty hath made me effeminate And in my temper soften'd valour's steel!” “O sweet Juliet, Thy beauty hath made me effeminate And in my temper soften'd valour's steel!” He says his love for Juliet made him “soft” and “effeminate” (womanly) and he didn’t want to fight.

17 Why are these lines important? ROMEO: This day's black fate on more days doth depend; This but begins the woe, others must end. ROMEO: O, I am fortune's fool! Evidence of the role of fate! Make note of these to use in your final response. (hang over them like a cloud) (other disasters) (fortune = fate)

18 Your assignment – Due Friday! be certain you are using evidence from the text to support your answers! Review the sections you’ve underlined and write a short paragraph response to the three prompts on the handout – be certain you are using evidence from the text to support your answers!


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