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Act 1 Scene 5 Romeo: Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear Romeo: For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night Tybalt: Ill not endure him. Romeo:

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Presentation on theme: "Act 1 Scene 5 Romeo: Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear Romeo: For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night Tybalt: Ill not endure him. Romeo:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Act 1 Scene 5 Romeo: Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear Romeo: For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night Tybalt: Ill not endure him. Romeo: (taking JULIETs hand) If I profane with my unworthiest hand /This holy shrine Juliet: You kiss by th' book Sonnet Structure Line 93-95 Romeo: Ay, so I fear. The more is my unrest Act 1 Scene 1 Romeo: Out of her favour, where I am in love Benvolio: Alas, that love, so gentle in his view, Should be so tyrannous and rough in proof! Romeo: Heres much to do with hate but more with love. Romeo: A choking gall, and a preserving sweet Romeo: I am not here./ This is not Romeo. Hes some other where. Romeo: She will not stay the siege of loving terms,

2 In Act 1 Scene 5 Romeo states that Juliets beauty is divine for earth too dear This shows how passionately Romeo falls in love with Juliet at first sight. He links her beauty to wealth rich and dear suggesting that women at the time were described as possessions and objectified. Later in the scene he describes Juliet as a holy shrine again suggesting that she is divine. This shows less objectification of Juliet as the religious imagery hints at the purity of his love as Shakespeares audience were religious. Romeo swears that he has never seen true beauty till this night. This is effective as it makes the audience think about his declaration of love for Rosaline. This creates the impression that his love for Juliet is more intense and real this time, or alternatively highlights Romeo as a fickle character who falls in love easily. The way in which Shakespeare structures the dialogue between Romeo and Juliet into a shared sonnet implies that they are an equal match. Rather than Romeo writing sonnets to Juliet that are not responded to as Shakespeare shows he has done in the past with Rosaline, they share a sonnet highlighting the balance of their emotions. In the scene we see Tybalt declaring his hate for Romeo to Capulet. Shakespeare uses the hate to contrast the declarations of love which shows the two extreme emotions that all the later events of the play are based around. In contrast, Juliet is more reserved when she states that Romeo kisses by the book which shows that she is satisfied with the reality of Romeo and doesnt need elevate her emotions. At the end of the scene Romeo declares that his love for Juliet is my unrest which foreshadows the later events in the play and highlights the power of Romeos love as he ignores his own warning. Furthermore it emphasises Romeos tendency to chose not to control his own emotions but to blame external factors as he shows himself to be a victim through this statement.

3 Act 3 Scene 1 Romeo: Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much. Mercutio: They have made worms' meat of me Romeo: My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt / In my behalf Benvolio: brave Mercutio's dead Romeo: Mercutio's soul Is but a little way above our heads, Staying for thine to keep him company Romeo: Either thou, or I, or both, must go with him Act 5 Scene 3 Romeo: Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth, /Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open/ And in despite Ill cram thee with more food! Romeo: Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath,/ Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty. Romeo: Oh, here / Will I set up my everlasting rest, Romeo: Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide.

4 Act 1 Scene 1 Benvolio: Ill know his grievance or be much denied. Benvolio: Tell me in sadness, who is that you love. Benvolio: Be ruled by me. Forget to think of her. Benvolio: Examine other beauties. Benvolio: Ill pay that doctrine or else die in debt. Act 3 Scene 1 Tybalt: Mercutio, thou consortst with Romeo. Romeo: Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much. Mercutio: They have made worms' meat of me Mercutio: I was hurt under your arm. Romeo: My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt / In my behalf Benvolio: brave Mercutio's dead

5 Act 3 Scene 1 Mercutio: A plague o' both your houses! Romeo: This day's black fate on more days doth depend/ This but begins the woe, others must end. Romeo: fire-eyed fury be my conduct now Romeo: Either thou, or I, or both, must go with him Benvolio: Stand not amazed: the prince will doom thee death Romeo: I am fortune's fool! Act 3 Scene 5 Romeo: give me thy hand, /One writ with me in sour misfortunes book Romeo: Thy drugs are quick. Prince: Their course of love, the tidings of her death. Prince: See what a scourge is laid upon your hate, That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love! Prince: Some shall be pardoned, and some punishèd.

6 Act 3 Scene 5 Lady Capulet: thou weepst not so much for his death/ As that the villain lives which slaughtered him. Juliet: He shall not make me there a joyful bride./I wonder at this haste, that I must wed Lady Capulet: I would the fool were married to her grave! Capulet: Unworthy as she is, that we have wrought /So worthy a gentleman to be her bride? Capulet: An you be mine, Ill give you to my friend/An you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets Lady Capulet: Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee Lady Montague: Where is Romeo? Saw you him today? /Right glad I am he was not at this fray. Montague: Away from light steals home my heavy son Montague: Black and portentous must this humor prove / Unless good counsel may the cause remove. Montague: I neither know it nor can learn of him. Montague: As is the bud bit with an envious worm/ Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air Montague: We would as willingly give cure as know.

7 Act 3 Scene 4 Capulet: Things have fall'n out, sir, so unluckily, /That we have had no time to move our daughter. Paris: These times of woe afford no time to woo. Lady Capulet: I will, and know her mind early tomorrow. Capulet: mark you me, on Wednesday next Capulet: Monday! Ha, ha. Well, Wednesday is too soon, O' Thursday let it be. Paris: I would that Thursday were tomorrow. Romeo: There is no world without Verona walls/ But purgatory, torture, hell itself. Romeo: Heaven is here,/ Where Juliet lives Romeo: every unworthy thing, Live here in heaven and may look on her, But Romeo may not. Romeo: steal immortal blessing from her lips Friar: A pack of blessings light upon thy back,

8 Act 3 Scene 1 Tybalt: Boy, this shall not excuse the injuries/That thou hast done me. Therefore turn and draw. Mercutio: O calm, dishonourable, vile submission! Romeo: Draw, Benvolio. Beat down their weapons. Romeo: O sweet Juliet/ Thy beauty hath made me effeminate /And in my temper soften'd valour's steel! Romeo: fire-eyed fury be my conduct now Act 1 Scene 1 Sampson: Draw, if you be men Benvolio: Part, fools! Put up your swords. You know not what you do. Tybalt: What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds? Benvolio: I do but keep the peace. Put up thy sword, Tybalt: What, drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the word/ As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.

9 Act 3 Scene 5 Juliet: He shall not make me there a joyful bride./I wonder at this haste, that I must wed Lady Capulet: I would the fool were married to her grave! Nurse: You are to blame, my lord, to rate her so…..Capulet: Hold your tongue Capulet: Unworthy as she is, that we have wrought /So worthy a gentleman to be her bride? Capulet: An you be mine, Ill give you to my friend/An you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets Lady Capulet: Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee Act 1 Scene 1 Sampson: therefore women, being the weaker vessels, are ever thrust to the wall. Sampson: When I have fought with the men, I will be civil with the maids. I will cut off their heads. Sampson: the heads of the maids, or their maidenheads/ Take it in what sense thou wilt Sampson: they shall feel while I am able to stand, and / tis known I am a pretty piece of flesh

10 Act 3 Scene 1 Mercutio: O calm, dishonourable, vile submission! Romeo: Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much. Romeo: my reputation stain'd Romeo: O sweet Juliet/ Thy beauty hath made me effeminate /And in my temper soften'd valour's steel! Benvolio: brave Mercutio's dead Romeo: fire-eyed fury be my conduct now Act 1 Scene 1 Gregory: The quarrel is between our masters and us their men. Sampson: I will bite my thumb at them, which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it. Sampson: Draw, if you be men Tybalt: What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds? Capulet: What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!


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