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Rudyard Kipling Presentation by Kylie Schumacher - 2011 Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography.

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Presentation on theme: "Rudyard Kipling Presentation by Kylie Schumacher - 2011 Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography."— Presentation transcript:

1 Rudyard Kipling Presentation by Kylie Schumacher Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

2 Biography A Look into the Life of Rudyard Kipling “…the writings of Rudyard Kipling exude a love of India and her people, not contempt or racial animus. In fact, his portrayals of India are in many ways more tender and sympathetic than those of the great modern Indian writers like Salman Rushdie, Rohinton Mistry and Arundhati Roy” (“Nobel Prize Winners 1907”). This quotation in the article Nobel Prize Winners 1907 defines Kipling’s poetry in a brilliant way. Joseph Rudyard Kipling was born to father John Lockwood Kipling and spouse Alice on December 30, 1865 in Bombay, India. At five years old, Kipling was flown to Southsea, England to live with a foster family, as was the custom during that time in India (“RUDYARD KIPLING”). He was terribly miserable there, and rightly so. He was beaten and victimized at the lodge he lived in, and due to the mistreatment, he endured insomnia for the rest of his life, which ended up having a vast impact on his writing (“Biography of Rudyard Kipling”). When Kipling was twelve, he was sent to the United Services College at Westward Ho!, which was near Bideford, England (“Rudyard Kipling – Biography”). The new change in social environment, including the English schoolboy code of honor and duty, affected Kipling’s views on loyalty later in his life (“Biography of Rudyard Kipling”). In 1882, Kipling returned home to his parents in Lahore, India. There, he worked as a part-time writer and newspaper reporter, which exposed him to the colonial life later expressed in his poems and writings. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

3 As Kipling grew older, he began to become preoccupied with his physical and mental strain and the passing of both of his children, Josephine and John, did nothing to help him. His published works were deeply affected by his breakdowns, causing scrutiny amongst the critics. Kipling’s poems dealt with racial and imperialistic themes, focusing on the British Empire while also writing about the common soldier (“Biography of Rudyard Kipling”) (“Rudyard Kipling – Biography”). Rudyard Kipling’s early life noticeably affected his writings in his later life, but this didn’t stop him from becoming a highly notable English poet. Kipling began writing during his teenage years while he attended the United Services College at Westward Ho!. Cormell Price provided perhaps the largest impact on Kipling and his literature by having him edit the school newspaper and complimenting the boy’s poems. Kipling mailed some of his poems home to his father, who in turn had them printed as Schoolboy Lyrics in When Kipling returned home to his parents in Lahore, India in 1882, he worked as a copy editor for the Civil and Military Gazette before later moving to the Allahabad Pioneer in 1887 (“Rudyard Kipling Biography”). In 1884, he published The Jungle Book, which by 1886 had become a children’s classic all over the world. His literary career jumpstarted when he first published Departmental Ditties in (“Rudyard Kipling – Biography”). Two years later in 1888, he published over seventy short stories, which indicated the inspiration of writers such as Edgar Allan Poe, Bret Harte, and Guy de Maupassant (“Rudyard Kipling Biography”). His first major break came in 1892 when he published Barrack-Room Ballads (“Rudyard Kipling”).Biography Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

4 Kipling’s most acclaimed poem was Recessional (1897), and his most famous story was Kim (1901). In 1907, Kipling won the Noble Prize in literature for his understanding of the capabilities of observation, ingenuity of imagination, virility of ideas and noteworthy talent for description which were illustrated in his writings (“Biography of Rudyard Kipling”). In 1926, Kipling accepted the Gold Medal of the Royal Society of Literature, which only a select few before him had achieved (“Rudyard Kipling – Biography”). Kipling’s writing style was majorly influenced by the time period he lived through. The main ideas surrounding his literature focused on imperialism and the life of the British soldier and Indian native. When he published the poems Danny Deever, Tommy, Fuzzy- Wuzzy, and Gunga Din, he introduced readers to a new Cockney dialect, which had a more serious tone to it (“Rudyard Kipling Biography”). In his poetry, Kipling used vivid metaphors in order to show the resemblance between two subjects in his poems. He also used rhymes that made his poetry interesting and flowing. After imperialism became almost non-existent in the world, Kipling’s poetry began to lose its power. Many people discontinued reading his literature and his published works were still highly criticized for their racial and imperialistic views. From 1919 to 1932, Kipling traveled around the world and continued to publish his works, though they were far from the prestige they had once been due to his psychological and physical stress. On January 18, 1936, Kipling passed away, leaving behind a diverse collection of literature and a legacy of a man whose literature had great power and depth (“Rudyard Kipling Biography”).Biography Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

5 List of Works “An American” “Anchor Song” “The Answer” “Arithmetic on the Frontier” “Army Headquarters” “As the Bell Clinks” “An Astrologer's Song” “The Ballad of the "Bolivar" “A Ballad of Burial” “The Ballad of East and West” “The Ballad of Fisher's Boarding-House” “A Ballad of Jakkko Hill” “The Ballad of the King's Jest” “The Ballad of the King's Mercy” “The Ballad of the Red Earl” “Banquet Night” “Beast and Man in India” “The Bees and the Flies” “Before a Midnight Breaks in Storm” “The Bell Buoy” “The Benefactors” “Belts” “The Betrothed” “Bill 'Awkins” "Birds of Prey" March” “Blue Roses” “Boots” “A Boy Scouts'Patrol Song” “Bridge-Guard in the Karroo” “A British-Roman Song” “The Broken Men” “Brookland Road” “Buddha at Kamakura” “The Burial” “Butterflies” “By the Hoof of the Wild Goat” “Cain and Abel” “The Captive” “A Carol” “Cells” “Certain Maxims Of Hafiz” “Chant-Pagan” “Chapter Headings” “A Charm” “The Children's Song” More Works More Works Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

6 If by Rudyard Kipling If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too: If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies, Or being hated don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise; If you can dream---and not make dreams your master; If you can think---and not make thoughts your aim, If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster And treat those two impostors just the same:. If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken, And stoop and build'em up with worn-out tools; If you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, And lose, and start again at your beginnings, And never breathe a word about your loss: If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!" If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with Kings---nor lose the common touch, If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you, If all men count with you, but none too much: If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds' worth of distance run, Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, And---which is more---you'll be a Man, my son! Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

7 Analysis The poem If by Rudyard Kipling, arguably his most famous, uses the literary device of rhyming commendably. Kipling’s poem discusses the qualities of someone, who is considered to be a ‘perfect’ man, would have. He continually states the traits that he thinks would make up the basis of the ‘perfect’ man’s personality, and how he must act in times of hardship or when he has risen to power. Kipling manages to get all of this across to the reader, while also integrating the literary device of rhyming. An example of this would be in the following lines: “If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,/But make allowance for their doubting too:/If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,/Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies,/Or being hated don’t give way to hating,/And yet don’t look too good, not talk too wise;” Another example would be: “If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken/Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,/Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,/And stoop and build’em up with worn-out tools;” A rhyme is defined as the sound of accented vowels and all succeeding sounds are identical, which Kipling undertakes in If and in these two examples. They each show the use of rhymes because the last word at the end of every line rhymes with the last word two lines before, like “fools” and “tools” in the last example. What makes it so impressive, is the fact that Kipling manages to use rhymes without losing the meaning of the poem to the rhyming words, and he doesn’t allow the rhyme to control the poem; he is still able to achieve the main points and theme of the poem. Kipling used rhyming to give the poem sort of rhythm, which makes the reader even more interested and allows them to become lost in the poem as they read. His brilliant and intuitive use of rhyme is one of the many reasons that Kipling has become one of the great poets of his time. If is an excellent poem that uses the literary device of rhyming in an outstanding way to allow the reader to enjoy the poem while fully comprehending the meaning behind the words. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

8 Sample Poems Recessional is one of Rudyard Kipling’s most renowned poems, and rightly so. In this piece of poetry, Kipling writes about the pride he has for the British Empire, while also including a deeper meaning of how he believes the Empire will fall to other, greater powers. Kipling loved the British Empire, but he predicted that the end of the Empire’s reign was soon to come. The lines “Lest we forget -- lest we forget!” would later become immensely popular after the end of World War I. This poem is one of my favorites of Kipling’s, not because it is popular, but because I enjoy the way that Kipling uses his words and how he manages to rhyme so easily. Recessional (A Victorian Ode) by Rudyard Kipling God of our fathers, known of old -- Lord of our far-flung battle line -- Beneath whose awful hand we hold Dominion over palm and pine -- Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, Lest we forget -- lest we forget! The tumult and the shouting dies -- The Captains and the Kings depart -- Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice, An humble and a contrite heart. Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, Lest we forget -- lest we forget! Far-called our navies melt away -- On dune and headland sinks the fire -- Lo, all our pomp of yesterday Is one with Nineveh and Tyre! Judge of the Nations, spare us yet, Lest we forget -- lest we forget! If, drunk with sight of power, we loose Wild tongues that have not Thee in awe -- Such boastings as the Gentiles use, Or lesser breeds without the Law -- Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, Lest we forget -- lest we forget! For heathen heart that puts her trust In reeking tube and iron shard -- All valiant dust that builds on dust, And guarding calls not Thee to guard. For frantic boast and foolish word, Thy Mercy on Thy People, Lord! Amen. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

9 Sample Poems Though not one of Rudyard Kipling’s most renowned pieces of poetry, The Gods of the Copybook Headings is still an excellently written piece of literature. In this poem, Kipling tried to have the “Gods of the Copybook Headings’ symbolizing governing forces. Countries throughout history have fallen because of false promises by their government, and many will continue to fall in the future because something will always become corrupt. Three of the most powerful lines to me were: “When all men are paid for existing and no man must pay for his sins/As surely as Water will wet us, as surely as Fire will burn/The Gods of the Copybook Headings with terror and slaughter return!” These lines explain that though a government will start out well, something may come up in the future that can destroy it. This poem struck me because the first time I ever heard it was when my dad made me watch the book trailer for Glenn Beck’s The Overton Window, and the man who voiced Optimus Prime was reading the last stanza of the poem. The Gods of the Copybook Headings by Rudyard Kipling As I pass through my incarnations in every age and race, Make my proper prostrations to the Gods of the Market- Place. 'eering through reverent fingers I watch them flourish and fall, And the Gods of the Copybook Headings, I notice, outlast them all. Ne were living in trees when they met us. They showed us each in turn That Water would certainly wet us, as Fire would certainly bum: But we found them lacking in Uplift, Vision and Breadth of Mind, So we left them to teach the Gorillas while we followed the March of Manlund. We moved as the Spirit listed. They never altered their pace, Being neither cloud nor wind-borne like the Gods of the Market-Place; But they always caught up with our progress, and presently word would come That a tribe had been wiped off its icefield, or the lights had gone out in Rome. Nith the Hopes that our World is built on they were utterly out of touch They denied that the Moon was Stilton; they denied she was even Dutch They denied that Wishes were Horses; they denied that a Pig had Wings S we worshipped the Gods of the Market Who promised these beautiful things. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

10 Sample Poems When the Cambrian measurres were forming They promised perpetual peace. They swore, if we gave them our weapons that the wars of the tribes would cease. But when we disarmed They sold us and delivered us bound to our foe, And the Gods of the Copybook Heading said: "Stick to the Devil yox know." On the first Feminian Sandstones we were promised the Fuller Life (Which started by loving our neighbour and ended by loving his wife) Till our women had no more children and the men lost reason and faith, And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: "The Wages of Sin is Death." In the Carboniferous Epoch we were promised abundance for all, By robbing selected Peter to pay for collective Paul; But, though we had plenty of money, there was nothing our money could buy, And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: "If you don't work you die." Then the Gods of the Market tumbled, and their smooth-tongued wizards withdrew, And the hearts of the meanest were humbled and began to believe it was true That All is not Gold that Glitters, and Two and Two make Four -- And the Gods of the Copybook Headings limped up to explain it once more. As it will be in the future, it was at the birth of Man -- There are only four things certain since Social Progress began -- That the Dog returns to his Vomit and the Sow returns to her Mice, And the burnt Fool's bandaged finger goes wabbling back to the Fire -- And that after this is accomplished, and the brave new world begins When all men are paid for existing and no man must pay for his sins As surely as Water will wet us, as surely as Fire will burn The Gods of the Copybook Headings with terror and slaughter return! The Gods of the Copybook Headings by Rudyard Kipling (Cont.) Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

11 Inspired Poems White Horses by Rudyard Kipling Where run your colts at pasture? Where hide your mares to breed? 'Mid bergs about the Ice-cap Or wove Sargasso weed; By chartless reef and channel, Or crafty coastwise bars, But most the ocean-meadows All purple to the stars! Who holds the rein upon you? The latest gale let free. What meat is in your mangers? The glut of all the sea. 'Twixt tide and tide's returning Great store of newly dead, -- The bones of those that faced us, And the hearts of those that fled. Afar, off-shore and single, Some stallion, rearing swift, Neighs hungry for new fodder, And calls us to the drift: Then down the cloven ridges -- A million hooves unshod -- Break forth the mad White Horses To seek their meat from God! Girth-deep in hissing water Our furious vanguard strains -- Through mist of mighty tramplings Roll up the fore-blown manes -- A hundred leagues to leeward, Ere yet the deep is stirred, The groaning rollers carry The coming of the herd! Whose hand may grip your nostrils -- Your forelock who may hold? E'en they that use the broads with us - - The riders bred and bold, That spy upon our matings, That rope us where we run -- They know the strong White Horses From father unto son. We breathe about their cradles, We race their babes ashore, We snuff against their thresholds, We nuzzle at their door; By day with stamping squadrons, By night in whinnying droves, Creep up the wise White Horses, To call them from their loves. And come they for your calling? No wit of man may save. They hear the loosed White Horses Above their fathers' grave; And, kin of those we crippled, And, sons of those we slew, Spur down the wild white riders To school the herds anew. What service have ye paid them, Oh jealous steeds and strong? Save we that throw their weaklings, Is none dare work them wrong; While thick around the homestead Our snow-backed leaders graze -- A guard behind their plunder, And a veil before their ways. With march and countermarchings -- With weight of wheeling hosts -- Stray mob or bands embattled -- We ring the chosen coasts: And, careless of our clamour That bids the stranger fly, At peace with our pickets The wild white riders lie..... Trust ye that curdled hollows -- Trust ye the neighing wind -- Trust ye the moaning groundswell -- Our herds are close behind! To bray your foeman's armies -- To chill and snap his sword -- Trust ye the wild White Horses, The Horses of the Lord! Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

12 Inspired Poems Wild Phantoms by Kylie Schumacher Not a sound could be heard across the prairie There was no breath of air, And yet the tendrils of grass moved, As if they were being stroked by the fingers of a ghost. Somewhere in the distance, A sound like that of rumbling thunder could be heard. Hooves pounded the silent ground, Causing a shudder to run through the earth. Hot air was expelled from flaring nostrils in a short burst, The grass becoming a rolling sea of waves. Heads were thrown back in a heated fashion, While high-pitched whinnies filled the air. The white herd of horses moved all at once, Like roaming silver phantoms. Their long, labored strides ate up the ground, Though they were on a road to nowhere. They ran for the joy of running, Only stopping when their bodies refused to continue. They rose as one over the hilltop and disappeared, Leaving behind the sound of silence across the prairie. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

13 Inspired Poems The Legend of Evil by Rudyard Kipling This is the sorrowful story Told when the twilight fails And the monkeys walk together Holding their neighbours' tails: -- "Our fathers lived in the forest, Foolish people were they, They went down to the cornland To teach the farmers to play. "Our fathers frisked in the millet, Our fathers skipped in the wheat, Our fathers hung from the branches, Our fathers danced in the street. "Then came the terrible farmers, Nothing of play they knew, Only...they caught our fathers And set them to labour too! "Set them to work in the cornland With ploughs and sickles and flails, Put them in mud-walled prisons And -- cut off their beautiful tails! "Now, we can watch our fathers, Sullen and bowed and old, Stooping over the millet, Sharing the silly mould, "Driving a foolish furrow, Mending a muddy yoke, Sleeping in mud-walled prisons, Steeping their food in smoke. "We may not speak to our fathers, For if the farmers knew They would come up to the forest And set us to labour too." This is the horrible story Told as the twilight fails And the monkeys walk together Holding their kinsmen's tails. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

14 InspiredPoems Twilight’s Secret by Kylie Schumacher This is the sorrowful story Told when the twilight fails And the world turns silent Bathed in moonlight. Death rises like a shimmer, Released from the anguished pits of hell. Bringing with it a black, cursed fog. That strokes the ground with a heated passion. All forms of light vanish on the spot, Cast out by the vengeful mist. All sounds cease in imminence, Swallowed and gathered by the air. A cool gust of air slices its way through the trees, Coating the battered branches in glistening white. A crack splits the silence, Its wavelengths filling the silent atmosphere. The world abruptly returns to silence, The ominous spell over. Noiselessly, death creeps and slithers away, As twilight turns to dawn. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

15 Original Poems Watery Destruction by Kylie Schumacher Rain comes pelting down As the heavens open their drains. Animals turn up their noses And scurry for cover. While the trees open their pores Breathing the moisture in. Clouds block out the sun like drapes Encasing the forest in a dreary gray. Wind slices through the rain Forcing it to fall at a faster pace. Booming thunder pounds the sky Followed abruptly by a flash of light. All sound ceases to exist, All except the drip-drop of rain. Animals remain huddled in their dens, Patiently awaiting the end of the storm Their previous attempts to gather food have been terminated, Everything having been swept away. Vehemently the storm rages on, Allowing the forest no escape. Torrents of water mix with the sodden earth, Leaving a path of destruction in its wake. Debris is washed away, As the rain comes pelting down. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

16 Original Poems Choices by Kylie Schumacher Why do we lie When all we seek is the truth? Why do we lie When our lies are remembered? Why do we lie When we are already broken? What will it take For the truth to be told? What will it take For the liars to be forgiven? What will it take For the lies to be forgotten? When wrong is right And right is wrong Which is the path to follow? If the world is filled with opinions Won’t someone choose right And someone choose wrong? Remember the right And forget the wrong Remember the truth And forget the lies Because our life is too short To wallow in our cries. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

17 Original Poems Burning Rage by Kylie Schumacher Fire licks its way up the trees Encompassing them in its rage. Nothing can halt its attack As the flames continue to burn. Animals scurry from the forest, Desperate for a safe haven. For some, their attempts are futile, As the flames continue to burn. The fierce wind only fuels the fire Its whipping tendrils carrying the flames. Foliage turns to ash, As the flames continue to burn. Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems

18 Bibliography Biography: – – – – – Poems: – Pictures: – – – %5Bitem%5D-%5BP&P%5DCheck-for...-painting-artwork-print.jpg %5Bitem%5D-%5BP&P%5DCheck-for...-painting-artwork-print.jpg – – – – – – – – – – – Biography List of Works List of Works Sample Poems Sample Poems Original Poems Original Poems Bibliography Inspired Poems Inspired Poems


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