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Mennonites trace their heritage back to 16 th century Europe. Goshen College: A Heritage & A Future… A small group of people banded together around the.

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Presentation on theme: "Mennonites trace their heritage back to 16 th century Europe. Goshen College: A Heritage & A Future… A small group of people banded together around the."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Mennonites trace their heritage back to 16 th century Europe. Goshen College: A Heritage & A Future… A small group of people banded together around the idea that the Church and government should be separate.

3 The group also believed that faith is voluntary and therefore, the baptism of infants conflicted with and individual’s right to choose a life of faith. In 1525, Conrad Grebel began the practice of baptizing adults in Zurich, Switzerland, earning the group the name “Anabaptists.” Goshen College: A Heritage & A Future…

4 In response to the radical new concept of adult baptism, the Zurich City Council immediately began the persecution of the “Anabaptists” with a decree in 1525:

5 “Whoever hereafter baptizes someone will be apprehended by our Lords and, according to this present decree, be drowned without mercy.”

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7 Governments throughout Europe brutally persecuted the Anabaptists, primarily in response to the group’s refusal to serve in the military.

8 In 1536, a Catholic priest converted to Anabaptism and began traveling throughout Europe preaching and writing to further Anabaptist causes. Menno Simmons had a profound impact on the Anabaptists. Some Anabaptists would later come to call themselves Mennonites.

9 Goshen College A Heritage & A Future…

10 compassionate peacemakers Explore ways to work for peace and justice “As Christian peacemakers, we embrace ‘shalom’—the peace that God intends for humanity. We are committed to build the ‘peaceable kingdom’ by practicing loving kindness, restoring justice, practicing anti-racism, loving our enemies and advocating for the dispossessed. We renounce the oppressive, violent, destructive powers of this world—and we are willing to live our lives as examples of God’s peace.” Core Values Scripture reference: Matthew 5:9

11 servant leaders Core Values Enter the world ready to lead and serve “We believe that servant leadership is reflected perfectly in the life and person of Jesus Christ. We humbly set aside self-interest for the interests of others, because love for others builds up God’s community. By following Christ’s example, we create a culture characterized by joyful service.” Scripture reference: Matthew 20:26-28

12 global citizens Core Values Scripture reference: II Corinthians 5:18-20 “As responsible global citizens, we see, encourage and celebrate the image of God in others. We welcome and include the ‘stranger’ in our midst—respecting differences in world views while seeking common ground. We wish to transcend barriers between people not only through academic teaching and learning, but also in meaningful cross- cultural exchanges. We go into the world offering our gifts and lives in service to others.” Experience new ideas and cultures

13 passionate learners Core Values Scripture reference: II Peter 1:5-8 Expect excellent academics “We believe our faith is supported by knowledge. As a learning community, we foster a journey of lifelong learning, encouraging one another to seek truth with fervor. This spirit of academic excellence enriches our relationships, our world and our faith in Jesus Christ.”

14 Scripture reference: I Corinthians 3:11 Core Values “We believe God is the foundation of all wisdom and knowledge. Through Christ we find merciful forgiveness and an invitation to a daily, personal walk empowered by the Holy Spirit. We are led by Christ in our search for truth.”

15 Strategic History and contributing factors for Goshen College 2-5 Year plans are traditional—which has been appropriate to the volatile nature the institution External opinions have, until very recently, been regarded as uninformed and therefore unimportant

16 The college has been experiencing financial difficulties—including having to cut $1 million from the budget, followed by another $1 million cut last year Mennonite Church has been gradually becoming more accepting of “outside” opinions in recent years Strategic History and contributing factors for Goshen College

17 Final budget standing will not be determined until the new student class and tuition dollars arrive in the fall The college seems to have corrected its financial struggles— the budget seems to be balancing for the year Strategic History and contributing factors for Goshen College

18 Goshen College into the Future: Developing The Strategic Plan Step 1: Perform analysis of current conditions for the college Step 2: Revise Mission Statement Step 3: Develop Vision Statement Step 4: Develop Core Elements of the strategic plan Step 5: Develop and implement tactics to accomplish Core Elements, thereby accomplishing the Strategy, Vision and Mission

19 T O WS SWOT Analysis S “Secularization does not apply at Goshen College” Mennonite Heritage Study Service Term Christian/Mennonite Niche Peace-making/Global Citizen Emphasis Academics W O World-view—International Perspective and Faculty Study Service Term Mennonite Students “Other than Mennonite” Students Infusion of Heritage and Curriculum Name Recognition “Secularization does not apply at Goshen College” T Decreasing Number of Mennonite Students Generational Trending “Secularization” Tuition dependence Financial standing Church Ambivalence toward Higher Education Location Name Recognition Lack of Reputation Philosophical objections to competition (Rowley & Sherman)

20 Strategic Positioning Zone 1 Zone 2Zone 3 Large Resource Base Small Resource Base More Consumer-Oriented Educational Systems More Provider-Oriented Educational Systems Research Comprehensive Community Colleges Specialty Small (Rowley & Sherman)

21 Competitive Spreadsheet $22,120 $22,990 $12,150 DescriptionEnrollmentHighest DegreeCost Eastern Mennonite University Fresno Pacific University 4-yr undergrad., traditional/non- traditional liberal arts, Mennonite, residential, etc. 900Bachelor’s 4 + yr undergrad, grad, traditional/ non-traditional, liberal arts, Mennonite, residential, etc. 922Master’s 4 + yr undergrad, grad, traditional/ non-traditional, liberal arts, Mennonite, residential, etc. 2,000Master’s (Rowley & Sherman)

22 Strategic Planning Operational Planning MISSION VISION GOALS ACTIONS (Dr. Van Gray)

23 CORE ELEMENTS PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION VISION GOALS ACTIONS MISSION: Goshen College is a community of learners providing an environment which fosters personal, social, intellectual, and spiritual growth and which builds confidence, acceptance, and identity necessary for purposeful, Christian living in Church and society. (Dr. Van Gray)

24 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS PREFERRED FUTURE: Serving the individual, the Church and our global community, Goshen College aims to set the standard of excellence for Christ-centered education that is academically progressive, building on a firm foundation of Mennonite heritage, within a supportive and inclusive environment. CORE ELEMENTS

25 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS: 1.Develop and encourage global citizenship 2.Build, develop and advance the Mennonite heritage and tradition 3.Develop the student population 4.Provide students with outstanding academics opportunities 5.Provide students with outstanding facilities 6.Improve the endowment and financial standing of the college CORE ELEMENTS

26 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS CORE ELEMENTS (by 2020): 1.Develop and encourage global citizenship a.Increase international faculty to 85% b.Increase students studying abroad to 85% c.Achieve a “missional” community 2.Build, develop and advance the Mennonite heritage and tradition a.Community awareness/outreach b.First six-weeks curriculum c.Simmons Sabbatical Faculty Award 3.Develop the student population a.Increase student population to 1,500—60% increase b.Increase faculty to meet student need—maintaining 16:1 ratio c.Missional student community

27 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS CORE ELEMENTS (by 2020): 4.Provide students with outstanding academic opportunities a.International faculty b.Facilities c.Excellence in Academics Task Force d.Student Scholarship programs 5.Provide students with outstanding facilities a.New residence hall construction b.Bridge construction c.Renovation of residence hall d.Renovation of museum 6.Improve the endowment and financial standing of the college a.Increase endowment to $175 million (current is $77 million—endowment per student will increase from $85,500 to $116,600)

28 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 1 ( )— Core Element 1 (Global Citizenship): Increase percentage of students studying abroad to 73% (current is 68%) Increase percentage of faculty who have studied or lived abroad to 70% (current is 65%) Core Element 2 (Mennonite Heritage): Develop and implement First Six Weeks curriculum Develop and implement the Simmons Sabbatical program for faculty Core Element 3 (Student Population): Build student enrollment to 1,100 (increase of 50 students per year) Add two new admission recruiting positions—one position will be designated to work exclusively with Mennonite prospective students Add 14 new faculty positions (increase of 3 positions per year)

29 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 1 ( )— Core Element 4 (Academics): First six-weeks curriculum New staff/faculty Orientation Formation of the Excellence in Academics Task Force (deadline for recommendations to the college: 2008) Development and implementation of the Sattler Student Scholars scholarship program which will provide 10 full-tuition scholarships for top student scholars in each new student class

30 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 1 ( )— Core Element 5 (Facilities): New residence hall construction Fundraising to commence immediately Construction to begin 2009 Move-in date: 2010, capacity: 400 All-weather bridge over railroad tracks

31 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 1 ( )— Core Element 6 (Financial Standing): Expansion of the donor base Recruitment of new donors Grant writing Capital campaign Zero-based budgeting Surplus operational budget funds go to strategic plan implementation

32 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 1 ( ) FINANCIAL DISPERSEMENT—

33 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 2 ( )— Core Element 1 (Global Citizenship): Increase percentage of students studying abroad to 80% Increase percentage of faculty who have served or lived abroad to 77% Core Element 2 (Mennonite Heritage): Select the new Simmons Sabbatical faculty award recipient Core Element 3 (Student Population): Build student enrollment to 1,300 (increase of 50 students per year) Add 14 new faculty positions (increase of 3 positions per year)

34 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 2 ( )— Core Element 4 (Academics): Implementation of Excellence in Academics Task Force recommendations and action items 10 additional (total 20) Sattler Student Scholars Core Element 5 (Facilities): Residence hall renovation project

35 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 2 ( )— Core Element 6 (Financial Standing): Expansion of the donor base Recruitment of new donors Grant writing Capital campaign Zero-based budgeting Surplus operational budget funds go to strategic plan implementation

36 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 2 ( ) FINANCIAL DISPERSEMENT—

37 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 3 ( )— Core Element 1 (Global Citizenship): Increase percentage of students studying abroad to 85% Increase percentage of faculty who have studied or lived abroad to 85% Core Element 2 (Mennonite Heritage): Select new Simmons Sabbatical faculty recipient Core Element 3 (Student Population): Build student enrollment to 1,500 (increase by 50 students per year) Add 14 new faculty positions (increase by 3 positions per year)

38 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 3 ( )— Core Element 5 (Facilities): Center for Global Citizenship construction project Core Element 4 (Academics): Implementation of Excellence in Academics Task Force recommendations and action items 10 additional (total 20) Sattler Student Scholars

39 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 3 ( )— Core Element 6 (Financial Standing): Expansion of the donor base Recruitment of new donors Grant writing Capital campaign Zero-based budgeting Surplus operational budget funds go to strategic plan implementation

40 PREFERRED FUTURE MISSION ACTIONS CORE ELEMENTS ACTIONS: THE THREE PHASE PLAN PHASE 2 ( ) FINANCIAL DISPERSEMENT—

41 Goshen College A Heritage & A Future… Mennonite & Missional in 2020

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