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Fall 2012 Member Training. Setting the Stage Adapted from Town Hall Meeting, 2010 Campus Alcohol Coalition History Environmental Management Review of.

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Presentation on theme: "Fall 2012 Member Training. Setting the Stage Adapted from Town Hall Meeting, 2010 Campus Alcohol Coalition History Environmental Management Review of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Fall 2012 Member Training

2 Setting the Stage Adapted from Town Hall Meeting, 2010 Campus Alcohol Coalition History Environmental Management Review of Dr. Tom Workman’s presentation at the Town Hall Meeting, 2010

3 Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused drug among youth in the United States, more than tobacco and illicit drugs. (National Institute of Drug Abuse, 2007) People aged 12 to 20 years drink 11% of all alcohol consumed in the US and more than 90% of this alcohol is consumed in the form of binge drinks. (Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 2005) In 2005, there were more than 145,000 emergency room visits by youth 12 to 20 years for injuries and other conditions linked to alcohol. (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2007)

4 According to Florida’s 2007 report on the Economic Costs of Underage Drinking, Florida spends around $3 billion dollars each year due to behavior attributed to Underage Drinking The associated costs to our local community: Northwest Florida Region - Total Cost $222, Escambia County Cost $65, Santa Rosa County Cost $19,230.00

5 According to studies by Hingson, et al. (2002 & 2009), underage and high risk drinking result in: Death: 1,825 college students deaths, including motor vehicle crashes Injury: 599,000 students are unintentionally injured Assault: 696,000 students are assaulted Sexual Abuse: 97,000 students are victims of alcohol- related sexual assault or date rape Health Problems: More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol-related health problem

6 (Research conducted by Dr. Susan Tapert of the University of California, San Diego) Functional activity levels in the brain of a 15-year-old male on memory test

7 The belief that: “Underage drinking is a rite of passage that all youth will engage in regardless of what we say.” “If we educate youth about the dangers, they will stop high-risk behavior.” “If we crack down on underage drinking, it will only make youth want to drink more.” “If we let them drink younger, they will learn how to handle alcohol.”

8 Initiated as part of NCAA Choices Grant in 2005 as a task force Became a University Standing Committee in 2008 Consists of a broad membership of campus faculty, staff, students and community representatives who are stakeholders in this issue. Involved in: Reviewing/revising campus alcohol policies Recommending judicial sanctions for alcohol violations Advising alcohol misuse/abuse prevention initiatives Student drinking and driving safe ride program development Data collection and research Public relations and communication with campus/community (praise and concerns) Collaboration with community partners

9 Increase campus-community knowledge about the UWF Alcohol Campus Coalition. Act as an advisory board for alcohol misuse/abuse prevention initiatives and grants. Provide recommendations to policy reviews, sanctions, alcohol-related violations, and environmental strategies. Initiate collaboration with other campus and community groups in efforts to support health and safety of the entire community. Create a campus culture that encourage responsible alcohol use through policies, programs, and education; create and enforce a consistent message of responsible drinking throughout the community. Challenge the cultural acceptance of high-risk practice and reduce incidence of alcohol poisoning. Support campus efforts in prevention-programming and evidence- based research.

10 In supporting healthy and safe campus environments and reducing substance abuse among college students, the Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention promotes a comprehensive approach termed environmental management. This approach is grounded in the social ecological model of public health that acknowledges and attempts to address a broad array of factors that influence individual health decisions and behaviors on the institutional, community, and public policy levels, in addition to those at the individual and group levels.

11 Motivations for engaging in high-risk behaviors vary from one person to the next, as do the motivations for changing or curbing those behaviors. Environmental management seeks to bring about behavior change through multiple channels, both promoting positive behaviors and norms and also discouraging high-risk behaviors.

12 While environmental management encompasses a spectrum of programs and interventions from primary prevention to early intervention and treatment, it stresses the prevention of high-risk behavior through changes to the environment in which students make decisions about their alcohol and other drug use.

13 Excerpts From: Thomas Workman, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Baylor College of Medicine Presentation from the NW Florida Town Hall Meeting

14 The Ecological Model of Public Health Individual Factors: Biological Psychological Spiritual Environmental Factors Beliefs & Values Systems & Infrastructure Resources & Materials Climates & Conditions

15 Individual Factors: Biological Psychological Spiritual Environmental Influences Surrounding Substance Use Unclear or Inconsistent Community Standards Promotion of High Risk Activities Absent or Inconsistent Enforcement Surrounding Normative Behavior Myths, Rituals, and Traditions Absent or Inconsistent Adjudication Attractive Opportunities to Use/Abuse Available Spaces and Resources Access and Availability to Substances

16 POLICY EDUCATION ENFORCEMENT DESIGN Codified standards for behavior in the community Knowledge of community standards; self-efficacy Negative consequences or positive reinforcement Spaces, rituals, and practices that support the desired behavior

17 Policy Social host liability Drink special restrictions Dram shop law/ordinance Provisional licensing of retail establishments Community covenants: Parents, bar owners, families Parental notification policies Education Community standard guides Ride along programs Community service at detoxification centers Community forums and media programs

18 Enforcement Wild Party patrol units Compliance check programs “Off-campus” applications of school codes of conduct Substance coding in citation records City Council Substance Committee Design Late night hours for coffee shops, recreation centers Late night activities at schools and downtown venues Redesigned hospitality centers with expanded options Collaborative partnerships between retail and schools Civic spaces with increased surveillance

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21 Impact of price and availability on consumption Density of available access points Source of substance Location(s) of consumption Patterns of consumption (time, day, locations, circumstances) Promotional materials: Frequency, Message, Density Substance-related calls for service by number, location Substance-related ER visits

22 Focus on creating the ideal community rather than “fixing” the problem. Use data to fully understand the environmental influences that create the ideal and plan strategies. Involvement of all stakeholder groups is critical – cooperation does make a difference. Comprehensive and sustained activity has proven to be most successful.

23 What does Florida’s Board of Governors assess as important for campus-based alcohol prevention practices?  See handout

24 1. Increase campus-community knowledge about the UWF Alcohol Campus Coalition. 2. Act as an advisory board for alcohol misuse/abuse prevention initiatives and grants. Support campus efforts in prevention-programming and evidence-based research. 3. Provide recommendations to policy reviews, sanctions, alcohol-related violations, and environmental strategies. 4. Initiate collaboration with other campus and community groups in efforts to support health and safety of the entire community. 5. Create a campus culture that encourage responsible alcohol use through policies, programs, and education; create and enforce a consistent message of responsible drinking throughout the community. 6. Challenge the cultural acceptance of high-risk practice and reduce incidence of alcohol poisoning. 0%

25 How many groups? Do-able projects Reporting procedures Inviting Executive Leadership Presenting to Extended Cabinet

26 1. Establish system for communication with community for DUI, alcohol related criminal behavior, and alcohol-related ER visits. 2. Collaboration group - Increase connection with PSC, local alcohol retailers, etc. How do they see UWF? UWF students? Do they have concerns for students? Suggestions? 3. Nurture relationship with establishments who have responsible beverage practices. Create incentive for students to visit these establishments over those establishments that are of concern.

27 4. Training/Continuing Education group to keep abreast of current issues, good trainings, etc. 5. Ordinance work group 6. Health Beat article for Voyager 7. Campus Culture Committee – white paper identifying recommendations for campus growth (traditional aged students, residential students, tailgating, football) 8. Alcohol-retention calculator 9. Collaborate on Medical Amnesty Policy


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