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Marilyn Ricci, M.S., R.D. Developed for NAMI Convention 2008 EATING FOR BOTH MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH Whole grains Look at ingredient list. The first.

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Presentation on theme: "Marilyn Ricci, M.S., R.D. Developed for NAMI Convention 2008 EATING FOR BOTH MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH Whole grains Look at ingredient list. The first."— Presentation transcript:

1 Marilyn Ricci, M.S., R.D. Developed for NAMI Convention 2008 EATING FOR BOTH MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH Whole grains Look at ingredient list. The first ingredient should say for example “whole wheat”. Look at the nutrition panel for 3 grams of dietary fiber in all bread products. Besides the benefits of a high fiber diet, grains provide B vitamins, folic acid, iron and magnesium. Research at Penn State found that dieters who ate lots of whole grains lost more belly fat and improved their levels of an inflammatory marker that is linked to diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Fiber prevents constipation and helps prevent diverticulitis and colon cancer. Recommend 6 servings per day (Based on a 2000 calorie diet- U.S. Department of Agriculture MyPyramid) Low Fat Dairy Dairy products are our main source of calcium and vitamin D, essential for healthy bones and teeth. Dairy is also a good source of potassium, protein and magnesium. Research from Brigham and Women’s Hospital of 30,000 women n the Women’s Health Study found that an increased intake of low fat dairy products reduced women’s risk of developing hypertension. Some research points to a weight reduction benefit of dairy calcium showing it to trigger the body to burn more fat, particularly around the waistline. Recommendation is 1200 mg dairy calcium per day. This is the equivalent of 4 cups of low fat milk. (The U.S. Department of Agriculture MyPyramid recommends 3 cups per day based on a 2000 calorie diet.)

2 Omega 3 Essential Fatty Acids Omega 3 fatty acid is found through out the body, especially in the brain and eyes. Omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids are “good” fats. They are essential because our bodies cannot make them and they are necessary for good health. Intake of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids should be in a balanced ratio. Our diet has too much omega 6 disrupting the balance which makes us more susceptible to disease. Choosing food high in omega 3 fatty acids can restore proper balance. Fish, especially fatty fish like salmon and tuna, are excellent sources of omega 3 fatty acids. Benefits of omega 3 are improved lipid profile reducing cardiovascular risk, improved diabetes outcome, improved neurotransmission stimulation improving depression, reducing suicide and hostility and improve memory function. Recommendation of omega 3 is 1.6 grams/day for men and 1.1 grams per day for women. Recommend intake of omega 6 is grams per day for men and grams for women. (U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Academy of Science, Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board “Dietary Reference Intakes for Individuals”. The American Heart Association recommends that all adults eat fish at least 2 times per week.)

3 Low Fat Dairy Dairy products are our main source of calcium and vitamin D, essential for healthy bones and teeth. Dairy is also a good source of potassium, protein and magnesium. Research from Brigham and Women’s Hospital of 30,000 women n the Women’s Health Study found that an increased intake of low fat dairy products reduced women’s risk of developing hypertension. Some research points to a weight reduction benefit of dairy calcium showing it to trigger the body to burn more fat, particularly around the waistline. Recommendation is 1200 mg dairy calcium per day. This is the equivalent of 4 cups of low fat milk. (The U.S. Department of Agriculture MyPyramid recommends 3 cups per day based on a 2000 calorie diet.) VEGETABLES Everyone knows that they should eat a lot of vegetables. Vegetables are low in calories, high in fiber, potassium, vitamins A, C, and E and phytonutrients. Vegetables that are dark in color have the most nutrients. Examples are broccoli, spinach, sweet potatoes, and carrots. Benefits of eating vegetables include reduced cancer risk, reduced risk of heart disease, lower blood pressure, diabetes prevention, help with weight control, and so much more. Recommendation is 5 (½ cup) servings of vegetables every day. (This is based on a 2000 calorie diet -U.S. Department of Agriculture MyPyramid)

4 FRUITS Besides vegetables, fruits are the most colorful foods on the plate. They provide fiber, vitamin C, folic acid and phytonutrients and are relatively low in calories. Benefits of fruits are similar to those of vegetables. Recommendation is 4 (½ cup) servings of fruits every day. (This is based on a 2000 calorie diet -U.S. Department of Agriculture MyPyramid) NUTS and SEEDS Walnuts are the most nutrient packed of the nuts and seeds, but all contribute a lot to good health. Walnuts, for example, contain plant omega 3 fatty acids, vitamins E and B6, magnesium, protein, fiber, potassium, and polyphenols. Since nuts and seeds are high in calories and expensive, it is very important to eat them in small amounts. Recommendation is ¼ cup per day and no more. Nuts and seeds are a portion of your protein requirement for the day, for ex. 1 oz of almonds = 12 nuts; 1 Tablespoon of peanut butter = 1 oz.

5 BEANS All beans are inexpensive nutrient powerhouses. They contain low fat protein, fiber, B vitamins, iron, folate, potassium, magnesium, and phytonutrients. Beans can help lower cholesterol, combat heart disease, stabilize blood sugar, help with constipation and diverticulitis reduce blood sugar and control weight. Recommendation is to substitute meat with beans – often. (The American Cancer Society 1996 Guidelines.) PROTEIN Meat is the main source of protein in the U.S. diet. Reducing the amount of meat we eat is essential to eating more healthful. All meat choices should be lean. Beans and nuts can substitute for meat in meals. Fish should be eaten at least twice a week. This food group (meat, beans, seeds, nuts, and fish) provides protein, B vitamins, iron, magnesium, zinc and vitamin E. Protein is the primary material of our bodies. The building blocks of protein are amino acids some of which are essential as they cannot be made in the body and must be consumed in food. Some of the roles of protein are: supporting growth and maintenance such as building new tissues and, replacing worn out cells; building enzymes and hormones; building antibodies which improve the immune system; maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance; maintaining acid-base balance; providing energy. Recommendation is 5 ½ ounces per day. (This is based on a 2000 calorie diet - U.S. Department of Agriculture MYPyramid.)

6 FOOD SOURCES FOR A HEALTHFUL DIET WHOLE GRAINS Look for cereals and breads with at least 3 grams of fiber per serving. Whole wheat; Brown Rice; Oats; 100% Whole Grain Cereals; Popcorn (low fat) with omega 3’s); Barley; Whole Wheat Pasta OMEGA 3 FATTY ACIDS MEATS AND BEANS Food Grams of omega 3 1 OZ =  Salmon 3 oz 1.9 ¼ cooked beef patty  Tuna, canned light 3 oz.2 or chicken breast  Sardines in sardine oil 3 oz egg  Trout 3 oz 1 ¼ cup cooked beans  Swordfish 3 oz walnut halves  Herring, pickled 3oz almonds  Other fish 3 oz range T peanut butter  Canola oil 1 T 1.3  Soy nuts  Walnuts ¼ cup 2.5  Flaxseed 2 T 2.4  Omega 3 enriched eggs 1.11  Omega 3 Smart Balance light 1 T.3  Omega 3 peanut butter 2 T 1  Mayonnaise made with Canola 1T.35  Wheat germ.5

7 LOW FAT DAIRY Food Calcium Milk all kinds 8 oz 300 mg Yogurt 8 oz 300 mg Cheese 1 ½ ounce 300 mg Shredded cheese ½ cup 300 mg Cottage cheese 2 cups 300 mg VEGETABLES 5 servings per day, each ½ cup FRUITS 4 servings per day, each ½ cup

8 DAY 1 Breakfast Milk, Low fat, 1% fat w/added vitamin A 1 cup Orange Juice, frozen, unsweetened, w/calcium, prep ½ cup Cereal, Total Raisin Bran/Gen Mills ¾ cup Snack 10 pieces of Walnuts Lunch Tossed Salad: ½ cup Mixed Salad Greens ½ cup Spinach 3 cherry Tomatoes 2 Tbsp Carrots grated 2 slices cucumber 1 Tbsp Italian Dressing, light Grilled Cheese Sandwich: 2 slices 100% Whole Wheat Bread American Cheese, Low fat 1 Tbsp Smart Balance light with Flax oil Soup, Lentil canned Progresso Healthy Classics 1 cup

9 Snack Apple, medium Dinner Salmon, Atlantic Farmed, baked 3 oz Sweet Potato, medium baked in skin Corn, canned ½ cup Smart Balance light with Flax oil 1 tsp Strawberries, Fresh 1 cup Snack Raisins ¼ cup KEY NUTRIENTS Omega 3: 2683 Omega 6 to 3 radio: 4 to 1 Dietary Fiber: 35 g Protein: 66 g Calcium: 1685 mg

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11 DAY 2 Breakfast Milk, Low fat, 1% fat w/added vitamin A 1 cup Orange Juice, frozen concentrate, unsweetened, prep ½ cup Cereal, Cheerios/Gen Mills 1 cup Fruit, Banana, White, ripe 1 whole Snack Peanuts all Types, dry roasted w/salt 10 each Lunch Peanut butter Smart Balance omega 3 2 Tbsp Bread, 100% Whole Wheat 2 slices Cheese, string 100% natural Light 1 piece Snack Seeds, Sunflower Kernels, dry roast w/o salt 1/4 cup

12 Dinner Pasta, penne plus Barilla Cooked 2 cups Tomato Sauce, low sodium 1 cup Soy Smart ground protein crumbles 1/3 cup Tossed Salad Salad Greens, Mixed, raw ½ cup Spinach, raw ½ cup Tomato, Cherry 2 each Carrots, chopped/grated, raw 2 Tbsp Cucumber, raw 2 slices Salad Dressing, Italian, light 1 Tbsp Walnuts, pieces 7 halves Blueberries fresh 1 cup Snack Puddings, tapioca, ready-to-eat, fat free 1 cup KEY NUTRIENTS Omega 3: 3328 g Omega 6 to 3 radio: 1 to 1 Dietary Fiber: 37.8 g Protein: 96 g Calcium: 1025 mg

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