Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Learning Criteria to Support 21 st Century Learners.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Learning Criteria to Support 21 st Century Learners."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Learning Criteria to Support 21 st Century Learners

2 Change Model International Center for Leadership in Education WHY Prepare students for their future

3 The primary aim of education is not to enable students to do well in school, but to help them do well in the lives they lead outside of school.

4 We’ve created false proxies for learning… Finishing a course or textbook has come to mean achievement Listening to lecture has come to mean understanding Getting a high score on a standardized test has come to mean proficiency

5 Learning should have its roots in.. Meaning, not just memory Engagement, not simply transmission Inquiry, not only compliance Exploration, not just acquisition Personalization, not simply uniformity Collaboration, not only competition Trust, not fear

6

7 Out of every 100 ninth graders….

8 65 will graduate from high school

9 39 will enter college

10 26 are still enrolled in the sophomore year

11 15 will graduate from college

12 Many involved in “school re- invention work” would argue that change is the most talked about and least acted upon concept in education today.

13 Change Model International Center for Leadership in Education WHY

14 Digital Learners

15

16 Digital Immigrants & Digital Natives Conventional SpeedTwitch Speed Step by StepRandom Access Linear ProcessingParallel Processing Text FirstGraphics First Work OrientPlay Oriented Stand-AloneConnected

17 Change Model International Center for Leadership in Education WHY W H A T Rigor, Relevance, Relationships for ALL Students

18 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework Teacher Work Teacher/Student Roles Student Think Student Think & Work Student Work

19 Rigor, Relevance and Relationships

20 R X R X R = LCWRS Relationships X Relevance X Rigor = Life, College, Work Ready Students

21 You can’t teach kids you don’t know….

22 RIGORRIGOR RELEVANCE A B D C Increasing Rigor/Relevance High Low

23 Remember this….. Using only achievement data as the total focus of your plan to improve learning is a mistake. The inclusion of culture/climate data, sometimes referred to as “soft data,” helps build sustainable long term results.

24

25 Basic Knowledge/Skills English Language (spoken) Reading Comprehension (in English) Writing in English (grammar, spelling, etc.) Mathematics Science Government/Economics Humanities/Arts Foreign Languages History/Geography “Are They Really Ready To Work?” Applied Skills Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Oral Communication Written Communication Teamwork/Collaboration Diversity Information Technology Application Leadership Creativity/Innovation Lifelong Learning/Self Direction Professionalism/Work Ethic Ethics/Social Responsibility

26 Job Outlook 2002, National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE)

27 21 st Century Work Force Literacy: The Knowledge Economy As much as 80% of all literacy tasks at work require document and quantitative information, text, media, and responses to nonfiction prose text. Who in your school is responsible for teaching document, quantitative and technological literacy? Where is it assessed in your curriculum? 1982 study showed that high schools spend only 2% of instructional time on this type of literacy. There is an increase, largely due to Internet use; however, such instruction is still under 20%.

28 Lexile Framework ® for Reading Study Summary of Text Lexile Measures Text Lexile Measure (L) High School Literature College Literature High School Textbooks College Textbooks Military Personal Use Entry-Level Occupations SAT 1, ACT, AP* * Source of National Test Data: MetaMetrics Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%)

29 What We Spend Time Doing Gets Done… Schools now focus on: 1. Learning Literacy (learning to read, write, speak and listen) 2. Literacy Learning (using literacy skills to learn content) We need to spend time, much more time, on: 3. Literacy to Do (using documents and electronic sources to take action, create, and problem solve)

30 Taking Action with Text, Media and Writing Prose Literacy Editorials News stories Brochures Instructional materials Document Literacy Job applications Payroll forms Transportation schedules Maps Tables Drug or food labels Quantitative Literacy Checkbook balancing Tip calculation Order form completion Interest calculations Benefit and nutrition comparison calculations Advertisement comparing prices and other data Technological Literacy Filing taxes online Travel arrangements Photo management Document assembly and creation “Personal digital libraries” of music and other media

31 Education is a chalkboard world

32 21 st Century Skills Why Rigor and Relevance?

33 Agricultural Age… Farmers Industrial Age… Factory Worker Informational Age… Knowledge Worker Conceptual Age… Creator / Empathizer

34 Three reasons for this… Abundance Asia Automation

35 #1 Abundance Malls, Target, PetsMart, Best Buy, Homes, Cars Self Storage Trash …. USA spends more on trash bags than 90 countries spend on everything

36 Abundance has produced an ironic result… Lessened the significance of things because you can get it anywhere. (no longer enough to create a product that’s reasonably priced and functional) Products must be more R – Directed beautiful, unique, meaningful, “aesthetic imperative”

37 #2 ASIA Knowledge workers new competition.. India, Philippines, China Programmers 70k – 80k are paid what a Taco Bell worker makes Chip designers 7k in USA …..1K in India Aerospace Engineers USA 6K… $650 in Russia Accountant USA 5K… $300 in Philippines

38 2007 – World Economic Leaders 1. United States 2. Japan 3. England 4. Germany Source: Goldman Sacks

39 2040 – World Economic Leaders 1. China 2. India 3. United States 4. Mexico 5. Russia 6. Brazil 7. Germany 8. England Source: Goldman Sacks

40  16th Spain  17th Netherlands  18th France  19th Britain  20th USA  21st ???—no one country will ever again be the dominant focus of the entire century.

41 #3 Automation Last century machines proved they could replace human backs This century new technologies are proving they can replace human “left brains” Any job that depends on routines is at risk. Automation is changing even doctors work. Outsource.com

42 Left hemisphere is sequential, logical and analytical. The Left powered the Information Age. Still necessary, but no longer sufficient. Right hemisphere is non linear, intuitive and holistic. The Right qualities of inventiveness, empathy, joyfulness and meaning will power the Conceptual Age.

43 High Concept / High Touch GM’s top leader… I see us being in the art business. MBA’s becoming the blue collar workers for the conceptual age. Graphic designers have increased ten fold in the last decade. Since 1970, 30% more people are earning a living as writers. More Americans today work in art, entertainment and design than as lawyers, accountants and auditors.

44 21 st Century Skills Learning & Innovation Skills –Creativity & Innovation –Critical Thinking & Problem-solving –Communication & Collaboration Information, Media & Technology Skills –Information Literacy –Media Literacy –ICT Literacy Life & Career Skills –Flexibility & Adaptability –Initiative & Self-direction –Social & Cross-cultural Skills –Productivity & Accountability –Leadership & Responsibility

45 Three Question Exercise 1.What will the world be like 20 years from now? 2.What skills will your child need to be successful in that world? 3.What would learning look like if it was designed around your answers?

46 The Learning Criteria

47 Change Model International Center for Leadership in Education WHY W H A T Where are you? Where do you want to go? W H E R E Learning Criteria for 21st Century Learners

48 How do you want learning evaluated?

49

50 The Learning Criteria helps you put into action what you believe about learning.

51 Evaluation Systems Many of our systems are incomplete because we over measure some things and not measure enough of others.

52 Success Beyond the Test Core Academics Stretch Learning Student Engagement Personal Skill Development Rigor Relevance Relationships

53 Criteria Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school)

54 Core Academics State Achievement Test Results SAT/ACT Results Grade Point Average Full Schedule in Four Core Subjects

55 Criteria Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Student Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning)

56 Stretch Learning Advanced Placement (AP) Results IB Participation CTE Program Participation 3 or More Years in a 2 nd Language Course Specialized Certification National Education Organization College-Sponsored HS Course Credits 3 or More Science Lab Courses Special Education Declassification Specialized Art and Music Advanced Diploma Sequence Options Growth in Lexile Reading Measure

57 Criteria Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements) Student Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning)

58 Learner Engagement On Schedule to Graduate with Cohort Group Attendance Rate Tardiness Rate Submits Homework Assignments on Time Community Service No Discipline Referrals Participation in Extracurricular Activities Participation in Interscholastic Sports

59 Criteria Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements) Student Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning) Personal Skill Development (Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes)

60 Personal Skill Development Internships/Shadowing Opportunities Service Learning Opportunities Career Planning Activities Soft Skills Curriculum JROTC Portfolio Research Project Quadrant D Activities FAFSA

61 Core Stretch Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development

62 Core Stretch Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development Dimensions of the Learning Criteria

63 Learning Criteria to Support Rigor, Relevance & Relationships Every school has its own DNA. School success is measurable beyond the tests. Data must drive school improvement initiatives. School growth and continuous improvement is an ongoing, collaborative process. International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc.

64 The Learning Criteria to Support 21st Century Learners ©

65 Answering the Hard Questions 1.What is the core learning that you will stand behind for each and every student? 2. How do you insure that you are stretching each and every learner? 3. How do you know your students are motivated, committed and engaged in their learning? 4. What evidence supports the development of positive behaviors and attitudes, and how do you measure personal, social, service and leadership skills?

66 International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc Route 146 Rexford, NY Phone (518) Fax (518) – PowerPoint -


Download ppt "The Learning Criteria to Support 21 st Century Learners."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google