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Central Union High School District Board of Trustees Meeting April 16, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Central Union High School District Board of Trustees Meeting April 16, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Central Union High School District Board of Trustees Meeting April 16, 2013

2 Data Into Action Central Union High School District: LEA Plan Revision Michael Butler, Public Works April 16, 2013

3 DAIT Needs Assessment (Jan-Feb) Reviewed school and district data and documentation. Administered required State tools (APS, DAS, ELSSA, and ISS). Conducted site visits to all three schools. Interviewed key community, school, and district leaders. Synthesized key findings for District School Leadership Team (DSLT). 3

4 LEA Plan Development (Feb-Mar) Met with District leadership and DSLT to report findings and recommendations. Identified focus areas for LEA prioritization with corrective actions and implementation steps. Solicited input from DSLT. Assisted district leaders in drafting revised LEA Plan goals, strategies, and action steps. 4

5 Key DAIT Areas for Improvement Alignment of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Increase coherence and commonality of instruction in terms of academic expectations, pacing and content coverage, formative assessments, intervention and support. Alignment of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Build a college-going culture where all students graduate with an expectation of transition to postsecondary education, training, and/or employment. 5

6 Key Areas for Improvement (cont’d) Data Systems and Achievement Monitoring: Enhance accessibility and use of data to identify and target instructional support, provide re- teaching, and measure effectiveness of interventions. Professional Development: Reach consensus on a finite number of district-wide professional development foci for long-term support and reinforcement. 6

7 LEA Plan – Goal 1 (Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment) Goal 1A: Proficiency in Reading/Language Arts Goal 1B: Proficiency in Mathematics Goal 1C: Proficiency for High Priority Students Goal 1D: Effective Teaching and Administration Goal 1E: Involvement, Implementation, & Monitoring Goal 1F: Support for Schools in Corrective Action 7

8 LEA Plan – Goal 2 (EL Students) Goal 2A: AMAO 1, Annual Progress Learning English Goal 2B: AMAO 2, English Proficiency Goal 2C: AMAO 3, AYP for EL Subgroup Goal 2D: High Quality Professional Development Goal 2E: Parent & Community Participation Goal 2F: Parental Notification Goal 2G: Services for Immigrant Students 8

9 Other LEA Plan Goals Goal 3: Highly-Qualified Teachers Goal 4: Not applicable; no longer required Goal 5: Increase Graduation/Decrease Dropout Rates 9

10 Goal 1A – Proficiency in Reading/Language Arts Increase the percentage of students scoring Proficient or Advanced in Reading/Language Arts to 60% or higher, and reduce the proportion scoring Far Below Basic or Below Basic in to 15% or lower by June

11 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Reading/Language Arts Ensure that instruction is standards-aligned, utilizing common scope and sequence, and tested with common assessments. Convene English Curriculum and Assessment Team to develop and/or refine course pacing guides, district benchmark tests, and formative assessments. Implement and monitor key instructional strategies (e.g., academic language, close analytic reading, and writing prompts) in all classrooms. 11

12 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Reading/Language Arts Ensure that every student has access to standards-aligned instructional materials. Identify and select “bridge” materials for transition to CCSS. Research, evaluate, and select non-bridge CCSS materials. Develop CCSS-aligned study guides and formative assessments. 12

13 Goal 1B – Proficiency in Mathematics Increase the percentage of students scoring Proficient or Advanced in Algebra I to 40% or higher in Algebra I and 50% or higher in Geometry; reduce the proportion scoring Far Below Basic or Below Basic in Algebra I to 25% or lower and 15% or lower in Geometry by June

14 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Mathematics Ensure that instruction is standards-aligned, utilizing common scope and sequence, and tested with common assessments. Convene Math Curriculum and Assessment Team to develop and/or refine course pacing guides, district benchmark tests, and formative assessments. Implement and monitor key instructional strategies (e.g., Modeling and Discourse) in line with CCSS Mathematical Practice Standards. 14

15 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Mathematics Ensure that every student has access to standards-aligned instructional materials. Identify and select “bridge” materials for transition to CCSS. Research, evaluate, and select non-bridge CCSS materials. Develop CCSS-aligned study guides and formative assessments. 15

16 Goal 1C – Proficiency for High Priority Students Close the English Learner achievement gap to no more than 15% (AYP) and no more than 25 points (API) by June

17 Key Strategies and Action Steps for High Priority Students Ensure that every student working below grade level in ELA is provided with strategic or intensive intervention with clear entry/exit criteria, curriculum, monitoring, and counseling; provide extended learning time by adding 7 th and/or 8 th periods for interventions. Support classes for low level 9 th grade readers. Double-block of ELA for targeted 10 th graders. Accelerated Language for long-term EL students both during day and in extended day settings. 17

18 Key Strategies and Action Steps for High Priority Students Ensure that every student working below grade level in Math is provided with strategic or intensive intervention with clear entry/exit criteria, curriculum, monitoring, and counseling; provide extended learning time by adding 7 th and/or 8 th periods for interventions. Algebra I support classes for low level 9 th grade students. Algebra semester re-start policy for Fall failures. More relevance, application, and hands-on experiences as part of Math intervention. 18

19 Goal 1D – Effective Teaching & Administration (Prof Development) Come to consensus on a finite number of key, research-based instructional strategies that will be reinforced and supported over at least three years with ongoing professional development, collaboration, and monitoring. 19

20 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Professional Development Provide standards-based PD to all teachers to deepen implementation of key instructional strategies tied to cross-curricular literacy: Structure, content, and implications of ELA CCSS. Explicit Direct Instruction for lesson design. Academic Language and Close Analytic Reading. Six Traits of Writing. English 3D/Accelerated Language (ELD faculty). 20

21 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Professional Development Provide standards-based PD to all teachers to deepen implementation of key instructional strategies tied to cross-curricular numeracy: Structure, content, and implications of Math CCSS, especially the 8 Mathematical Practice Standards. Explicit Direct Instruction for lesson design. Increased use of Math manipulatives and classroom technology. 21

22 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Professional Development Provide regular opportunities for data-based collaboration for all teachers. Guidance on development of Professional Learning Communities focused on common approaches to lesson design, data analysis, re-teaching and intervention. Bimonthly analysis of student work tied to open- ended prompts and/or scenario-based problems with rubric scoring. 22

23 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Professional Development Provide leadership training for site administrators on: Transition to CCSS. Support and monitoring of instruction. Protocols for classroom walkthroughs and feedback to teachers. Use of assessment data. 23

24 Goal 1E – Involvement, Implementation & Monitoring By June 2016, CUHSD will become an information-driven district where data is accessible, analyzed, and used to identify target student subgroups for instructional support, target possible areas for re- teaching, and measure the effectiveness of instructional interventions. 24

25 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Program Monitoring Improve data quality and access, especially use of the Aeries.net and it’s analytic tool. Build data capacity and fluency among staff to access, use, and report data. Collaborate around data analysis for goal- setting, instructional planning, and design of interventions. Evaluate effectiveness of curricular innovations and interventions. 25

26 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Parent/Community Involvement Involve and engage staff, parents, and community in academic improvement strategies. Enhance school-home communication via smaller meetings with parents organized by targeted subgroups and grade levels. Implement automated parent notification system with ongoing monitoring. Promote community awareness of high school activities, events, extracurricular offerings, and academic priorities. 26

27 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Articulation Increase articulation with feeder middle schools around calendars, data sharing, and intervention programs/services. Increase articulation with postsecondary institutions around college and career readiness. 27

28 Goal 1F – Support for Schools in Corrective Action Provide differentiated support to schools based on Program Improvement status that address reasons for PI progression. 28

29 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Differentiated School Support School Improvement Strategies Expanding intervention programs and services. Funding TOSA to monitor interventions. Addressing needs of 9 th grade repeaters. New Curriculum Providing access to Read 180 and Accelerated Language. 29

30 Key Strategies and Action Steps for Differentiated School Support School Restructuring Hiring new staff. Extending the school day. Phasing out contract-based instruction. Expanding online credit recovery options. External Support Funding Public Works needs assessment and provision of site-based recommendations. Soliciting proposals for further external expertise. 30

31 Next Steps Communicating the LEA Plan to site-based stakeholders (staff, parents, students, and community). Transforming LEA Plan into a usable set of tasks/priorities to guide actions during Summer and into school year. Ensuring LEA Plan is supported and monitored by school, district, and community leaders. 31


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