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Student Engagement at Ferris State University, 2004 Submitted by the Student Engagement Task Force December 17, 2004.

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Presentation on theme: "Student Engagement at Ferris State University, 2004 Submitted by the Student Engagement Task Force December 17, 2004."— Presentation transcript:

1 Student Engagement at Ferris State University, 2004 Submitted by the Student Engagement Task Force December 17, 2004

2 Our Process Divided into two subcommittees –Connections –Calendar Defined Student Engagement Inventoried existing data and practices Task Force and subcommittees met weekly from October 29 to December 6 Convened four focus groups

3 At-large Members Raymond Gant, Co-chairperson Bill Potter, Co-chairperson Scott Hill-Kennedy, at-large

4 Connections Subcommittee Cindy Horn, Chairperson Wendy Samuels Brian Kegler Cheryl Cluchey Ira Childress

5 Calendar Subcommittee Don Flickinger, Chairperson Mike Cairns Lori Helmer Tony Kettel Will Gasper

6 Student Engagement, Defined An engaged campus encourages and facilitates students, faculty, and staff to be involved in academic, athletic, civic, cultural, service, and social organizations and to attend or participate in events in those areas of activity as appropriate to the educational mission of the University. Such engagement is inclusive in nature, reflecting the diversity of the campus community and building relationships among all stakeholders, both on the campus and in the community.

7 Some Data About Student Engagement at Ferris State University On the Big Rapids Campus

8 Baseline Facts About Student Engagement 5% of students belong to Greek societies 5% of students belong to honor or professional societies

9 Baseline Facts About Student Engagement 4% of students are in performing arts 3% of students participate in athletics 2.5% of students are campus leaders in governance, media, or residential life

10 Baseline Facts About Student Participation 50% of students are in non-Greek RSO’s 18% of students play intramural sports 10% of students volunteer

11 Baseline Facts About Student Attendance On average, students attend 3 entertainment events each year. On average, students attend 2 varsity athletic events each year. On average, students attend 1 cultural event each year.

12 Baseline Facts About Student Activity FLITE Door Count, : 316,838 (or 31 visits per student)

13 Baseline Facts About Student Activity Campus Employment, : 294,780 (or 9 hours/week for 2,312 students) Note: Off campus employment is not known.

14 Baseline Facts About Student Activity SRC Door Count, :203,342 (or 20 visits per student)

15 Some Survey Research About 1 st -year Student Engagement >80% live on campus 40% go home every other weekend or more (dining services reports suggest a higher rate of 75%) 70% study < 11 hours per week 40% are working on or off campus Data from EBI-FYI Studies, 2002 and 2003.

16 Some Survey Research About 1 st -year Student Engagement Data from EBI-FYI Studies, 2002 and % report that FSUS increased participation in organizations 50% report that FSUS increased volunteer activities 55% report that FSUS increased attendance at cultural events

17 Summary of Task Force Findings The Blind-folded Men and the Elephant Is it a wall? Is it a tree trunk? Is it a snake?

18 Current Connections Between Classroom and Extracurricular Activities Athletics – varsity, club, and intramural sports (school spirit, unity, identity, stress reduction) Civic – American Democracy Project, Community Studies Institute, classes, Jim Crow Museum, MLK Day Events Cultural – Arts & Lectures, Live at Williams, Entertainment Unlimited, concerts, plays, May Day Speaker, International Festival

19 Current Connections Between Classroom and Extracurricular Activities Service – Volunteer Center, Honors Program, Campus Compact, Philanthropies Social – FSUS, Honors, Professional Societies, Residential Life Diversity Implications – Minority Student Affairs events, MLK Day, May Day speaker, International Festival of Cultures

20 Task Force Recommendations

21 Potential New Connections Between Classroom and Extracurricular Activities Use feedback from attendees to inform future directions (serve food and make it fun). Improve promotion of events (marquee on quad, calendar, timely notices, enhance Channel 7 – less Powerpoint, use radio). Continue/enhance attendance by campus role models (e.g., prez, vps, deans, faculty).

22 Potential New Connections Between Classroom and Extracurricular Activities Establish a “legitimate” student center. Utilize skills of students to enhance promotion (TVP, Advertising, Marketing, Comm.). Obtain RSO sponsorship and collaboration for events. Examine University policies that inhibit engagement (catering costs, no outside food in Rankin, no-show fees for organizations).

23 Potential New Connections Between Classroom and Extracurricular Activities Minimize competing events, especially those that conflict with major initiatives. Reduce admission fees to encourage role model attendance. Create a more intimate and comfortable venue for performances and speakers.

24 Connections Between the Campus and the Community Examine University policies regarding the release of information to external agencies. Examine University policies concerning community agency presence on campus. Have a campus-wide Open House for community members every year. Arrange for cross advertising between Torch, Pioneer and Chamber Newsletter.

25 Connections Between the Campus and the Community Important to sustain projects and not drop them at the end of the course or academic year (Big Brothers-Big Sisters). Ask community what their needs are instead of telling them what we’ll do for them. (I’m here from the IRS,...) Include community events tab on the campus calendar. Create new forum for town-gown relations.

26 Connections Among Students and Faculty, Staff and Other Students Visibility of administrators, faculty, and staff attending various events on campus. Faculty lectures in residence halls (e.g., Pizza with a Prof). Improve the connection between students and academic advisors by enhancing academic advising.

27 Themes and Strategies to Foster Engagement Marketing strategies noted above. RSO sponsorship/collaboration of events. Powerful campus events calendar. Communicate need for students to experience new and different things (e.g., ballet v. step show). Activities and events need to be relevant and current (e.g., Michael Moore).

28 Themes and Strategies to Foster Engagement American Democracy Project VISTA Volunteer, Michigan Campus Compact, Academic Service Learning Student Development Record (co- curricular transcript) Use upperclass and graduate student leaders to encourage participation by explaining benefits.

29 University Calendar Implement proposed web calendar changes through UA&M and WOW E- Media. Calendar should be an inclusive listing of University activities with ability to sort by categories or dates. Calendar input should be centralized with output from that source to Torch, Cable 7, Bulldog Radio, and Chamber Newsletter.

30 University Calendar Organize calendar stakeholders group and schedule meetings at beginning of fall and winter semesters. Tuesday-Thursday at 11 a.m. is heavily used by both students and faculty.

31 Promote and Build Upon Existing Projects UA&M Calendar Project American Democracy Project Vista Volunteer & Service Learning Student Development Record pilot project Student Volunteer Center FSUS, Honors Program, and SCHOLAR Program Residence Hall Initiatives Bulldog Bonanza and Get Acquainted Day

32 Some New Ideas – Use Students Use feedback from attendees to inform future directions. Utilize skills of students to enhance promotion (TVP, Advertising, Marketing, Comm.). Obtain RSO sponsorship for events Use upperclass and graduate student leaders to encourage participation by explaining benefits.

33 Connections with Students Not in Big Rapids Option for students to pay student activity fee to be eligible for Student Government representation and benefits. Offer ticket discounts for away athletic events so students in TC, Flint, and Dowagiac might attend. Invite non-BR students to participate in FLEX.

34 Connections with Students Not in Big Rapids Include other campuses in “Week in Pictures” on the website. Have Torch include stories about those campuses in the paper. Recognize that extension students are primarily non-traditional and are already engaged with work, family, and life.

35 THANK YOU Task Force Members Subcommittee chairs Cindy Horn and Don Flickinger Staff who submitted data and other input Students who participated in focus groups Community members who participated in focus groups


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