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1 Leadership Training Troop 230. Agenda Module One—Introduction to Leadership (Know). –What a leader must know. Module Two—What Is Expected of Me? (Do).

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Presentation on theme: "1 Leadership Training Troop 230. Agenda Module One—Introduction to Leadership (Know). –What a leader must know. Module Two—What Is Expected of Me? (Do)."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Leadership Training Troop 230

2 Agenda Module One—Introduction to Leadership (Know). –What a leader must know. Module Two—What Is Expected of Me? (Do). –What a leader must do Module Three—How to Fulfill Your Role (Be). –What a leader must be.

3 3:00-4:10 Introduction to Troop Leadership (Know) Opening5min Warm up activity: 10min VisionJohn Balden10min Scout-Led TroopLuis Duran 10min Troop OrganizationJohn Balden20min Break10min

4 What is TLT all about? It is a troop-level “how to” –For all troop leaders and new Scouts. TLT teaches a Scout –how to be a leader, –what he needs to Know to perform his responsibility, –And how to Do it well.

5 Troop Leadership Training What age, rank, and leadership position is required? –Any age-including new Scouts-should attend this training. –The material is for all ranks and positions. Who conducts the training? –Scoutmaster, ASM& senior patrol leader Where is it held? –Deren-Huff Scout House How long is the course? –Three one-hour modules. –Can be done as one session or three separate ones.

6 TROOP 230 LEADERSHIP TRAINING " Training is the most important key to successful Scouting..."

7 From the start at the first Scout camp on Brownsea Island… …training has played an important part in the development of Scouting.,

8 Main Scoutmaster’s Job… “Training Scout leaders to run their troop is the Scoutmaster's most important job.” “Train Scouts to do a job, then let them do it.” “Never do anything a scout can do.” –Robert S. S. Baden-Powell

9 BSA Mission Statement The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is… –to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes –by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

10 Life Skills in a Values-Based Environment Scouting is a values-based program with its own code of conduct. The Scout Oath and Law help instill the values of good conduct and honesty. After one year in a troop a Scout will learn lifetime skills. –basic outdoor skills, self-reliance, how to get along with others. Scouting prepare you to live a more productive and fulfilling life.

11 Vision Statement BSA is a youth program of character development and values-based leadership training. Offer young people responsible fun and adventure; Instill lifetime values and develop ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law; Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership; Serve families and communities with its quality, values-based program.

12 Do troop's youth leaders encounter challenges? Organizing patrols Using duty rosters Planning menus and figuring food costs Encouraging advancement Guiding a patrol's involvement in problem solving Teaching outdoor skills Helping to ensure patrol safety during outings Helping other Scouts make the most of their own leadership opportunities Scouting offers a rich and varied arena in which to learn and use leadership skills.

13 Agenda Module One—Introduction to Leadership (Know). –What a leader must know. Module Two—What Is Expected of Me? (Do). –What a leader must do Module Three—How to Fulfill Your Role (Be). –What a leader must be.

14 What is a Scout-led Troop?

15 Scouts taking responsibility for their activities and achievements “Empowering scouts to be leaders” - this is the core of Scouting What does it mean when we say: “a Scout-led troop”?

16 Leadership is a position of responsibility; not authority What does it mean for us? Opportunity to make plan, organize and make decisions An environment to practice how to lead others A chance to make mistakes and learn from our mistakes Allows us to learn how to teach others to be successful Learn the importance of working as a team Gives us a chance to be creative Opportunity to direct and run an organization

17 Our responsibility (Scouts): Attend and participate in our weekly meetings and monthly campouts Respect one another and allow our fellow scouts to lead Take responsibility for our actions Provide solutions Be part of planning and executing of our events Volunteer to help, organize and run our events Honor our commitments Help one another at all times

18 . The way we lead: A Boy Scout troop is a small democracy. Under the Scoutmaster's direction: –Scouts are formed into patrols –plan the troop's program – …and make it a reality “The patrol method is not a way to operate a Boy Scout troop, it is the only way. Unless the patrol method is in operation, you don't really have a Boy Scout troop.” —Robert S. S. Baden-Powell

19 “The object of the patrol method is not so much saving the Scoutmaster trouble as to give responsibility to the scout.” —Robert S. S. Baden-Powell

20 Success by empowering the Scouts Organize and run the Troop meetings Organize and run the Troop activities Utilize the Patrol leaders' council Plan the Troop calendar Plan and execute Public service activities Plan Outdoor activities to learn and develop skills Remember ……..Scouting is 75% outing

21 Adult Responsibility in a Scout-led Troop…

22 Mentor Guide Counsel Advise Train Delegate Provide logistics Support Encourage Safety net ……Adults are there to support the Scouts In a Scout-run Troop, Adults are…

23 Cub ScoutsBoy Scouts Meetings planned byAdult Leaders - Scout Master, Den leader Patrol Leader Counsel (PLC) Meetings conducted byAdult Leaders - Scout Master, Den leader Senior Patrol leader OrganizationDens, by gradePatrols, all ranks Scouts are lead byAdult - Den Leader Patrol Leader CampoutsPlanned by adults - Meals planned and cooked by adults Patrols plan and cook meals PLC plan activities Scouts responsible for campsite Adults provide logistics LeadershipCubmaster acts as: “master of ceremony” Scoutmasters act as: Advisor, coach, mentor Skills developmentTake place indoorsTake place outdoors Boy Scouts vs. Cub Scouts

24 A Scout-led Troop has little room for: Adults operating in Cub Pack mode Adults loudly asserting authority Adults jumping in with more enthusiasm than patience Adults enabling codependency Adults driving advancement more than the scout Adults solving the problems Adults taking on the Scout’s responsibility Adults packing the Scout’s campout gear Adults socializing instead of supporting

25 Troop Organization Scoutmaster – John Balden Patrol Leader Council Sr. Patrol Leader Max Salinas Assistant SPL Nat Smith Assistant SPL Drew Barham Assistant SPL-QM Joseph Nicholson Elliott Raia Assistant PL Stags Colton Styer Assistant PL Sharks Sean Schuepbach Assistant PL Ravens Stephen Meaux Assistant PL Bobcats Michael Breton Assistant PL Indians Preston Sitkowski Assistant PL Dragons Patrol Leader Stags John Eenink Patrol Leader Sharks Asa Grimsley Patrol Leader Ravens Robert Hillyard Patrol Leader Bobcats Raghu Ramesh Patrol Leader Indians Travis Beaman Patrol Leader Dragons Jack Janik

26 Troop 230 Patrols Cody Beaman Michael Breton Cory Delaney Harrison Dial Holden Easterling Patrick Edelman Wes Hough Shane Mack Andrew McMasters Allen Messina Joseph Mullen Will Peters Raghu Ramesh PL Max Salinas Nat Smith Graham White Bobcat Kyle Balden Wesley Breaux Kevin Cooke Alexander Deibert Adrian Duran Robert Hillyard PL Thomas Knight Christian Martinez Stephen Meaux John Nicholson Elliott Raia Andrew Rebeck Noah Schmidt Michael Schwin Steven Ventura Raven Mitchell Anderson Rohan Chakraborty Alexandre Dugas Asa Grimsley PL Hillis Gussett Patrick Hillyard Jeremy King Chad Machen Taylor Machen John Martin Mason Mulry Joseph Nicholson Grant Noce Cameron Riggins Sean Schuepbach Zach Walker David Wells Shark Andrew Barham Cooper Carlyle Matthew Christnacht Carson Dial David Edelman John Eenink PL Keon Feldsien Nick Mojaver James Netland Daniel Schwin Rysen Shirzadi Jack Silva Colton Styer Stag Asst. Scoutmasters Steve Smith Luis Duran Tim Mitchell Asst. Scoutmasters Tom Raia Jeff Noce Terry Dugas Asst. Scoutmasters Zane Barham Jim Long Bill Reider Asst. Scoutmasters Alan Grimsley Andy Skabowski Kim Broadrick

27 Troop 230 Patrols Travis Beaman PL Charles Beck Carson Bock Ashish Chakraborty Brendan Collum Eric Cortez Michael Hart Brandon Lloyd Brandon Reider Hunter Rodriguez Parker Sanders Preston Sitkowski Indians Pearson Broadrick Jonathan Caffey Jack Janik PL Morgan Long Hayden Major Logan Mitchell Trace Oldner Camden Rogers Kyle Skabowski Alex Smith Ryan Tomberlin Dragons Asst. Scoutmasters David McMasters John Machen Barry Beaman Oscar Rodriguez Asst. Scoutmasters David McMasters John Machen Barry Beaman Oscar Rodriguez CLASS OF 2011 Troop 230

28 Additional Leadership Positions Patrick Edelman Hillis Gussett Patrick Hillyard Wesley Hough Sean Schuepbach Troop Guide Greg White Instructor TBD Carson Dial Scribe Mark Netland Joseph Nicholson Elliott Raia Quartermaster Bill Beck Andrew Rebeck James Netland Chaplain Aide Zane Barham Librarian TBD Steven Ventura Historian TBD Joseph Mullen Den Chief LeRoy Martin Nick Mojaver Bugler TBD Michael Breton OA Troop Rep. TBD

29 Additional Troop Support Committee Chair – Chris Walker Adult Training Coordinator – Paul Janik Advancement Chair - Mark Netland Bluiding Committee Rep. - Jere Dial Camping Coordinator – John Rebeck Chartered Org. Rep. - Jere Dial Eagle Advisor - Janice Salinas Flag Hardware - Steve Smith Flags Sales Coordinator- Todd Breton Health Forms - Fred Mojaver High Adventure Coordinator – Tom Raia Hospitality Chair – Manita Feldsien Membeship Chair - Merit Badge Coordinator – News Flash Mgr. – Claudia Wanczyk Publicity Coordinator - TBD Service Projects - David Wells Summer Camp '12 – Smith/Nicholson Treasurer - Donald Easterling Troop Master - Stephanie Thibodeaux Troop T Shirts – Hank Mullen Winter Camp '11 Coordinator – Beck/Beaman

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31 4:15-5:05What is expected of Me? (Do) Leadership Positions John Balden 5min Breakout sessions Leadership Position Breakout Sessions –Luis Duran, Zane Barham, 25min Team Building Activities20min Break 5min

32 Senior Patrol Leader Elected by the Scouts to represent them as the top youth leader in the troop. Reports to: The Scoutmaster Runs all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference. Runs the patrol leaders' council meeting. Appoints other troop youth leaders with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster. Assigns duties and responsibilities to youth leaders. Assists the Scoutmaster with youth leadership training. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

33 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader Is the second highest- ranking youth leader in the troop. Acts as the senior patrol leader in the absence of SPL or when called upon. He also provides leadership to other youth leaders in the troop. Reports to: The senior patrol leader Helps the senior patrol leader lead meetings and activities. Runs the troop in the absence of the senior patrol leader. Helps train and supervise the troop scribe, quartermaster, instructor, librarian, historian, and chaplain's aide. Serves as a member of the patrol leaders' council. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit. Lends a hand controlling the patrol and building patrol spirit.

34 Patrol Leader Is the elected leader of his patrol. He represents his patrol on the patrol leaders’ council. Reports to: The senior patrol leader Appoints the assistant patrol leader. Represents the patrol on the patrol leaders’ council. Plans and steers patrol meetings. Helps Scouts advance. Acts as the chief recruiter of new Scouts. Keeps patrol members informed. Knows what his patrol members and other leaders can do. Sets the example. Wears the uniform correctly. Lives the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

35 Assistant Patrol Leader Is appointed by the patrol leader leads the patrol in his absence. Reports to: The patrol leader Helps the patrol leader plan and steer patrol meetings and activities. Helps him keep patrol members informed. Helps the patrol get ready for all troop activities. Represents his patrol at patrol leaders’ council meetings when the patrol leader cannot attend.

36 Troop Guide Works with new Scouts. Helps them feel comfortable and earn their First Class rank in their first year. Reports to: The assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop Introduces new Scouts to troop operations. Teaches basic Scout skills. Coaches the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol on his duties. Works with the patrol leader at patrol leaders’ council meetings. Attends patrol leaders’ council meetings with the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol. Assists the assistant Scoutmaster with training. Counsels individuals Scouts on Scouting challenges. Sets a good example.

37 Troop Quartermaster Keeps track of troop equipment and sees that it is in good working order. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Keeps records on patrol and troop equipment. Makes sure equipment is in good working condition. Issues equipment and makes sure it is returned in good condition. Makes suggestions for new or replacement items. Works with the troop committee member responsible for equipment. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

38 Troop Scribe Keeps the troop records. Records the activities of the patrol leaders’ council keeps a record of dues, advancement, and Scout attendance at troop meetings. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Attends and keeps a log of patrol leaders’ council meetings. Records individual Scout attendance and dues payments. Records individual Scout advancement progress. Works with the troop committee member responsible for records and finance. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

39 Troop Historian Preserves troop photographs, news stories, trophies, flags, scrapbooks, awards, and other memorabilia. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Gathers pictures and facts about troop activities and keeps them in a historical file or scrapbook. Takes care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities. Keeps information about former members of the troop. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

40 Troop Librarian Oversees the care and use of troop books, pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge counselor lists. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Sets up and takes care of a troop library. Keeps records of books and pamphlets owned by the troop. Adds new or replacement items as needed. Keeps books and pamphlets available for borrowing. Keeps a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out, and follows up on late returns. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

41 Instructor Teaches Scouting skills. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Teaches basic Scouting skills in troop and patrols. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

42 Chaplain’s Aide Works with the troop chaplain to meet the religious needs of Scouts in the troop. He also works to promote the religious emblems program. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Assists the troop chaplain with religious services at troop activities. Tells Scouts about the religious emblem program for their faith. Makes sure religious holidays are considered during the troop program planning process. Helps plan for religious observance in troop activities. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

43 Den Chief Works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and den leaders in the Cub Scout pack. Reports to: The den leader in the pack and the assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop Knows the purposes of Cub Scouting. Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks. Encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation. Assists with activities in the den meetings. Is a friend to the boys in the den. Helps out at weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings. Meets with adult members of the den, pack, and troop as necessary. Sets the example. Wears the uniform correctly. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

44 Junior Assistant Scoutmaster Serves in the capacity of an assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. Must be at least 16 years old and not yet 18. He is appointed by the Scoutmaster because of his leadership ability. Reports to: The Scoutmaster Functions as an assistant Scoutmaster. Performs duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

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46 5:10-6:00How to Do your Job (Be) Servant LeadershipZane Barham 15min EDGE Teaching Method 15 min Additional Leadership Training 10 min –National Honor Patrol Requirements –Advanced training opportunities Scoutmaster minuteJohn Balden 1min Closing 5min

47 What is a Servant? Cook Waiter Butler Doorman Housecleaner Someone who does something useful for someone else.

48 What is a Servant Leader? A Leader –who Serves the people he leads –who Seeks to Understand the needs of the people he leads –who Plans based on the needs of the people he leads –who Takes Action based on the needs of the people he leads A Leader who Builds Leadership in those who need to build those skills

49 Examples of Servant Leaders Jesus – Washing the feet of His disciples Mother Teresa – Serving the poor of Calcutta Mahatma Gandhi – Serving the poor and mistreated

50 Applying Servant Leadership Patrol Leader/Asst Patrol Leader –Understand the needs of the scouts What rank advancement are they working on? What food allergies do they have? Who is close friends with whom? Who is usually left out or shy? –Plan accordingly Next campout assign cooking to those who need it Make sure the Grubmaster has taken food needs into account for the menu

51 Applying Servant Leadership Take Action –Be on time (ahead of time) – Have what you committed to bring – Make sure your patrol has all the gear they need – Be organized Build Leadership – A servant leader does not do everything. –They make sure each person has what they need to be successful in their leadership

52 Servant Leadership Sacrifice: –Meeting the needs of others instead of focusing on your own needs. Humility: –Admitting you don’t how to do something, but taking responsibility to learn how or enlisting someone who does. Golden Rule: –“Do unto other as you would have others do unto you.” Mt 7:12

53 “What is EDGE™?” EDGE™ is the method you will use to teach in your troop. The key to making EDGE™ work is to use it for all teaching opportunities. Make it a habit. Explain—The trainer explains how something is done. Demonstrate—After the trainer explains, the trainer demonstrates while explaining again. Guide—The learner tries the skill while the trainer guides him through it. Enable—The trainee works on his own under the watchful eye of the trainer. The trainer’s role in this step is to remove any obstacles to success, which enables the learner to succeed.

54 National Honor Patrol Award Given to patrols whose members make an extra effort to have the best patrol possible. A patrol can earn the award over a three-month period How?

55 National Honor Patrol Award Have a patrol name, flag, and yell. –Put the patrol design on equipment, and use the patrol yell. –Keep patrol records up-to-date. Hold two patrol meetings every month. Take part in at least one hike, outdoor activity, or other Scouting event. Help two patrol members advance one rank. Complete two Good Turns or service projects approved by the patrol leaders’ council. Wear the full uniform correctly at troop activities –at least 75 percent of patrol Have a representative attend at least three patrol leaders’ council meetings. Have eight members in the patrol or experience an increase in patrol membership.

56 Leadership Training Opportunities

57 National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) It is a council-level, weeklong advanced leadership skills course It is based on professional leadership courses. Scouts learn to assess the stages of team development Scouts acquire a toolbox of leadership skills.

58 National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) What age, rank, and leadership position is required? –Age 13+, First Class rank. –Any troop leader can attend. Who conducts the training? –Youth-led course with youth staff –Plus a few adult support staff Where is it held? –Outdoor setting, usually a council camp

59 National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience (NAYLE) What is this course all about? –This is a national level, weeklong “extreme leadership” training in a wilderness setting. It uses Philmont Ranger training to reinforce NYLT skills.

60 National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience (NAYLE) What age, rank, and leadership position is required? –Age 14+, with previous NYLT experience. –Any troop leader can attend. Who conducts the training? –Youth-led course with youth staff –Plus a few adult support staff Where is it held? –Philmont’s Rocky Mountain Scout Ranch

61 You are now officially trained to take on a leadership position. LEAD RESPONSIBLY BE A GOOD EXAMPLE


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