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1 Troop Leadership Training BSA Troop Leadership Training.ppt 02/08

2 “Training boy leaders to run their troop is the Scoutmaster's most important job.” “Train Scouts to do a job, then let them do it.” “Never do anything a boy can do.” —Robert S. S. Baden-Powell

3 Mission Statement The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

4 Because Scouting is a boy-led program, leadership is a vital part of the program. Scouts in leadership positions run their Troop or Patrol. You, by accepting a role of leadership are preparing yourself to be a leader throughout the rest of your life. Among the many challenges you will encounter are: Organizing your patrol. Using duty rosters. Planning menus and figuring out costs. Encouraging advancement. Guiding a patrol in problem solving and decision-making. Teaching outdoor skills. Ensuring safety during outings. Handling patrol finances. Helping other scouts make the most of their own leadership opportunities. Introduction

5 The badge of office does not automatically make you a good leader. Leadership can be frustrating and disappointing. If you do no have knowledge, skills or encouragement, your leadership position will mean nothing. This training session is designed to introduce you to these skills. Once you are completed you will be eligible to wear the “Trained” patch.

6 Troop Leadership Training Purpose The purpose of TLT is to give the youth leader: What he must KNOW to be successful in his leadership position. What he must BE to be successful. What he must DO to carry out his new responsibilities.

7 Troop Leadership Training Expectations Upon completion of this training, you will be expected to: Develop personal goals for your position Devote necessary time to your new position Work together to make the troop go Be a role model for other Scouts

8 Troop Leadership Training This Training Is Divided Into 3 Modules MODULE I - Introduction To Troop Leadership “What the youth leader should KNOW” MODULE II - How To Do Your Job “What the youth leader should BE” MODULE III - What Is Expected Of Me “What the youth leader should DO”

9 Module I – Introduction To Leadership (KNOW) In Module I we will discuss The Boy-Led Troop/living the Scout Oath & Law The Boy-Led Patrol Troop Organizational Chart Position Overview National Honor Patrol Award Module I

10 Module II – How To Do Your Job (BE) In Module II we will discuss Scoutmaster’s Vision of Success Teaching EDGE Discussion Troop Program Discussion Assignment Module II

11 Module III – What is expected of me? (DO) In Module III we will discuss Position Descriptions and Expectations Servant Leadership - Motivating Scouts to Lead Defining Success in Your Position Scoutmaster Conference Module III

12 Module I (KNOW) Introduction To Troop Leadership

13 Module I – Introduction To Leadership (What the youth leader should KNOW) The Boy-Led Troop/living the Scout Oath & Law The Boy-Led Patrol Troop Organizational Chart Position Overview National Honor Patrol Award Module I

14 The Boy-Led Troop/Living The Oath & Law

15 The Boy Scout Oath & Law... Words To Live By

16 The Scout Oath On my honor... By giving your word, you are promising to be guided by the ideals of the Scout Oath.... I will do my best... Try hard to live up to the points of the Scout Oath. Measure your achievements against your own high standards and don't be influenced by peer pressure or what other people do.

17 The Scout Oath... To do my duty to God... Your family and religious leaders teach you about God and the ways you can serve. You do your duty to God by following the wisdom of those teachings every day and by respecting and defending the rights of others to practice their own beliefs.

18 The Scout Oath... and my country... Help keep the United States by learning about our system of government and your responsibilities as a citizen and future voter. America is made up of countless families and communities. When you work to improve your community and your home, you are serving your country.

19 The Scout Oath... and to obey the Scout Law;... The twelve points of the Scout Law are guidelines that can lead you toward wise choices. When you obey the Scout Law, other people will respect you for the way you live, and you will respect yourself.

20 The Scout Oath... To help other people at all times;... There are many people who need you. Your cheerful smile and helping hand will ease the burden of many who need assistance. By helping out whenever possible, you are doing your part to make this a better world.

21 The Scout Oath... To keep myself physically strong,... Take care of your body so that it will serve you well for an entire lifetime. That means eating nutritious foods, getting enough sleep, and exercising regularly to build strength and endurance. It also means avoiding harmful drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and anything else that can harm your health.

22 The Scout Oath... mentally awake,... Develop your mind both in the classroom and outside of school. Be curious about everything around you, and work hard to make the most of your abilities.

23 The Scout Oath... and morally straight. To be a person of strong character, your relationships with others should be honest and open. You should respect and defend the rights of all people. Be clean in your speech and actions, and remain faithful in your religious beliefs. The values you practice as a Scout will help you shape a life of virtue and self-reliance.

24 The Scout Law TRUSTWORTHY A Scout tells the truth. He keeps his promises. Honesty is part of his code of conduct. People can depend on him. LOYAL A Scout is true to his family, Scout leaders, friends, school, and nation.

25 The Scout Law HELPFUL A Scout is concerned about other people. He does things willingly for others without pay or reward. FRIENDLY A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He seeks to understand others. He respects those with ideas and customs other than his own.

26 The Scout Law COURTEOUS A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position. He knows good manners make it easier for people to get along together. KIND A Scout understands there is strength in being gentle. He treats others as he wants to be treated. He does not hurt or kill harmless things without reason.

27 The Scout Law OBEDIENT A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop. He obeys the laws of his community and country. If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobey them. CHEERFUL A Scout looks for the bright side of things. He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy.

28 The Scout Law THRIFTY A Scout works to pay his way and to help others. He saves for unforeseen needs. He protects and conserves natural resources. He carefully uses time and property. BRAVE A Scout can face danger even if he is afraid. He has the courage to stand for what he thinks is right even if others laugh at or threaten him.

29 The Scout Law CLEAN A Scout keeps his body and mind fit and clean. He goes around with those who believe in living by these same ideals. He helps keep his home and community clean. REVERENT A Scout is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties. He respects the beliefs of others.

30 The Boy-Led Troop/Living The Oath & Law Scouting is a value-based program. Its aims are character development, citizenship training and mental and physical fitness. These aims are accomplished, in part, by allowing trained youth to lead themselves. The troop is a democracy the centers around the Patrol Leaders Council. Under the leadership of the SPL, the PLC decides on and implements the troop’s activities. Module I

31 The Boy-Led Troop/Living The Oath & Law Methods of Scouting The Ideals - Living the Scout Oath & Law The Patrol Method - Pride & identity The Outdoors - ¾ of Scouting is “outing” Advancement - Recognition & accomplishment Adult Association - Positive role models Module I

32 The Boy-Led Troop/Living The Oath & Law Methods of Scouting (con’t) Personal Growth - New experiences Leadership Development - Responsibility The Uniform - A symbol of belonging and unity Module I

33 Module One: Introduction to Troop Leadership The Boy Led Troop Empowering Scouts to be Leaders. Learn leadership by doing. Responsible for developing program. Figuring out how to achieve their goals. Leaders of the Boy Led Troop Scout Troop is a small democracy. Troop is divided into small groups each with its own leader. Leaders of each group make up the Patrol Leaders Council. The Patrol Leaders Council (PLC) Plans and runs the Troop program. Meets monthly to fine-tune events. Conducted by the Senior Patrol Leader. All patrols to participate, present ideas and concerns to be discussed. Scoutmaster attends to act as a coach and give advice but retains Veto power over the PLC decisions. “KNOW”

34 The Boy-Led Patrol

35 "The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method." Lord Baden-Powell, Scouting's founder

36 The Boy-Led Patrol Just as a Scout troop has an identity, so does each patrol within the troop. The success of the boy-led troop depends on the success of the boy-led patrol. Each patrol should “find” it’s own identity and promote “Scout Spirit” and cooperation within the patrol. Module I

37 The Boy-Led Patrol How a Patrol Succeeds Patrol identity (flags, yells, songs) Cooperation from all members Participation from all members Regular patrol meetings Inter-patrol activities and rivalries Module I

38 The Boy Led Patrol The Patrol Patrol is the building block of the Troop. Work together as a TEAM. Optimum size is eight. Each Patrol selects a name, creates a flag and a yell. A patrol takes pride in itself. Three Types of Patrols Regular Patrols. New-Scout Patrols. Venture Patrols. Patrol Leaders Lead role in planning and conducting patrol activities. Encourage advancement. Represent the patrol at the PLC Set a good example. Other Patrol Positions Assistant Patrol Leader. Patrol Scribe. Patrol Quartermaster.

39 Troop Organizational Chart

40 Module I

41 Scoutmaster TROOP ORGANIZATION CHART Junior Assistant Scoutmaster ASM TFC Patrol Senior Patrol Leader Assistant Senior Patrol Leader Panda Patrol Leader Phoenix Patrol Leader Assistant Patrol Leader Chaplain's Aide QuartermasterHistorianScribeLibrarianOA Troop Representative Instructor Patrol Scribe Quartermaster Chaplain’s Aide Patrol Scribe Quartermaster Chaplain’s Aide Troop Guide TFC Eagle Patrol Leader ASM each Patrol ASM for ASPL/Staff Patrol Scribe Quartermaster Chaplain’s Aide Assistant Patrol Leader Den Chiefs

42 Position Overview

43 Position Overviews Senior Patrol Leader. Assistant Senior Patrol Leader Patrol Leader Assistant Patrol Leader Troop Guide Quartermaster Scribe OA Troop Representative Historian Librarian Instructor Chaplain Aide Den Chief. Junior Assistant Scoutmaster.

44 Position Overview Senior Patrol Leader The SPL is in charge of troop meetings and functions and is the chairman of the PLC. The SPL is responsible for ensuring that troop meetings and functions run smoothly. The SPL should set the example for other Scouts and is held to the highest Scouting standard. He promotes “Scout Spirit” within the troop. Module I

45 Position Overview Assistant Senior Patrol Leader The ASPL takes the place of the SPL in his absence. Other responsibilities of the ASPL may include Scout training, direction to the troop Quartermaster, Scribe, OA Troop Rep., etc. The ASPL is NOT a member of a patrol. He works closely with the SPL in planning. Module I

46 Position Overview Patrol Leader The PL, elected by the members of his patrol, represents his patrol on the PLC. He works with the SPL and ASPL’s to plan troop meetings and functions and communicates the needs of his patrol to the PLC. He promotes “Scout Spirit” within his patrol. Module I

47 Position Overview Scoutmaster The SM’s role is to provide his youth leaders with the tools and training they need to successfully run a boy-led troop and to be quality leaders. The SM provides the boys with resources and guidance they need to accomplish this. The SM then steps into the background and lets them do their jobs. Module I

48 Position Overview Assistant Scoutmaster The ASM acts as the SM in his absence. In addition, the ASM might assist a new Scout patrol. He may also provide support for the troop’s activities by coordinating those activities and making arrangements. Module I

49 Position Overview Troop Committee The TC acts as the troop’s “board of directors”. The TC is responsible for assisting the PLC, through the SM, in the accomplishment of activities and functions, i.e., transportation, fund-raising, advancement, planning courts of honor, etc. Module I

50 SENIOR PATROL LEADER Position description: The senior patrol leader is elected by the Scouts to represent them as the top youth leader in the troop. Reports to: The Scoutmaster Senior patrol leader duties: Runs all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference. Runs the patrol leaders' council meeting. Appoints other troop youth leaders with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster. Assigns duties and responsibilities to youth leaders. Assists the Scoutmaster with youth leadership training. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

51 ASSISTANT SENIOR PATROL LEADER Position description: The assistant senior patrol leader is the second highest-ranking youth leader in the troop. He is appointed by the senior patrol leader with the approval of the Scoutmaster. The assistant senior patrol leader acts as the senior patrol leader in the absence of the senior patrol leader or when called upon. He also provides leadership to other youth leaders in the troop. Reports to: The senior patrol leader Assistant senior patrol leader duties: Helps the senior patrol leader lead meetings and activities. Runs the troop in the absence of the senior patrol leader. Helps train and supervise the troop scribe, quartermaster, instructor, librarian, historian, and chaplain's aide. Serves as a member of the patrol leaders' council. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit. Lends a hand controlling the patrol and building patrol spirit. Wears the uniform correctly.

52 PATROL LEADER Position description: The patrol leader is the elected leader of his patrol. He represents his patrol on the patrol leaders’ council. Reports to: The senior patrol leader Patrol leader duties: Appoints the assistant patrol leader. Represents the patrol on the patrol leaders’ council. Plans and steers patrol meetings. Helps Scouts advance. Acts as the chief recruiter of new Scouts. Keeps patrol members informed. Knows what his patrol members and other leaders can do. Sets the example. Wears the uniform correctly. Lives the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

53 ASSISTANT PATROL LEADER Position description: The assistant patrol leader is appointed by the patrol leader and leads the patrol in his absence. Reports to: The patrol leader Assistant patrol leader duties: Helps the patrol leader plan and steer patrol meetings and activities. Helps him keep patrol members informed. Helps the patrol get ready for all troop activities. Represents his patrol at patrol leaders’ council meetings when the patrol leader cannot attend.

54 TROOP GUIDE Position description: The troop guide works with new Scouts. He helps them feel comfortable and earn their First Class rank in their first year. Reports to: The assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop Troop guide duties: Introduces new Scouts to troop operations. Guides new Scouts from harassment by older Scouts. Helps new Scouts earn First Class rank in their first year. Teaches basic Scout skills. Coaches the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol on his duties. Works with the patrol leader at patrol leaders’ council meetings. Attends patrol leaders’ council meetings with the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol. Assists the assistant Scoutmaster with training. Counsels individuals Scouts on Scouting challenges. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

55 TROOP QUARTERMASTER Position description: The quartermaster keeps track of troop equipment and sees that it is in good working order. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Quartermaster duties: Keeps records on patrol and troop equipment. Makes sure equipment is in good working condition. Issues equipment and makes sure it is returned in good condition. Makes suggestions for new or replacement items. Works with the troop committee member responsible for equipment. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

56 TROOP SCRIBE Position description: The scribe keeps the troop records. He records the activities of the patrol leaders’ council and keeps a record of dues, advancement, and Scout attendance at troop meetings. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Scribe duties: Attends and keeps a log of patrol leaders’ council meetings. Records individual Scout attendance and dues payments. Records individual Scout advancement progress. Works with the troop committee member responsible for records and finance. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

57 TROOP HISTORIAN Position description: The troop historian preserves troop photographs, news stories, trophies, flags, scrapbooks, awards, and other memorabilia. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Historian duties: Gathers pictures and facts about troop activities and keeps them in a historical file or scrapbook. Takes care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities. Keeps information about former members of the troop. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

58 TROOP LIBRARIAN Position description: The librarian oversees the care and use of troop books, pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge counselor lists. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Librarian duties: Sets up and takes care of a troop library. Keeps records of books and pamphlets owned by the troop. Adds new or replacement items as needed. Keeps books and pamphlets available for borrowing. Keeps a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out, and follows up on late returns. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

59 INSTRUCTOR Position description: The instructor teaches Scouting skills. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Instructor duties: Teaches basic Scouting skills in troop and patrols. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

60 CHAPLAIN’S AIDE Position description: The chaplain’s aide works with the troop chaplain to meet the religious needs of Scouts in the troop. He also works to promote the religious emblems program. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Chaplain aide duties: Assists the troop chaplain with religious services at troop activities. Tells Scouts about the religious emblem program for their faith. Makes sure religious holidays are considered during the troop program planning process. Helps plan for religious observance in troop activities. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

61 DEN CHIEF Position description : The den chief works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and den leaders in the Cub Scout pack. Reports to: The den leader in the pack and the assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop Den chief duties: Knows the purposes of Cub Scouting. Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks. Encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation. Assists with activities in the den meetings. Is a friend to the boys in the den. Helps out at weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings. Meets with adult members of the den, pack, and troop as necessary. Sets the example. Wears the uniform correctly. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

62 JUNIOR ASSISTANT SCOUTMASTER Position description: The junior assistant Scoutmaster serves in the capacity of an assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. He must be at least 16 years old and not yet 18. He is appointed by the Scoutmaster because of his leadership ability. Reports to: The Scoutmaster Junior assistant Scoutmaster duties: Functions as an assistant Scoutmaster. Performs duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

63 National Honor Patrol Award

64 The National Honor Patrol Award is given to patrols whose members make an extra effort to have the best patrol possible. A patrol can earn the award by doing the following over a three-month period: 1.Have a patrol name, flag, and yell. Put the patrol design on equipment, and use the patrol yell. Keep patrol records up-to-date. 2.Hold two patrol meetings every month. 3.Take part in at least one hike, outdoor activity, or other Scouting event. 4.Complete two Good Turns or service projects approved by the patrol leaders’ council. 5.Help two patrol members advance one rank. 6.Wear the full uniform correctly at troop activities (at least 75 percent of patrol’s membership). 7.Have a representative attend at least three patrol leaders’ council meetings. 8.Have eight members in the patrol or experience an increase in patrol membership.

65 End Module I

66

67 Module II (BE) How To Do Your Job

68 Module II – How To Do Your Job (What the youth leader should BE) Scoutmaster’s Vision of Success Teaching EDGE Discussion Troop Program Discussion Assignment Module II

69 The Scoutmaster’s Vision of Success

70 Vision Statement The Boy Scouts of America is the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training. In the future, Scouting will continue to: Offer young people responsible fun and adventure; Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in them ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law; Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership; Serve America’s communities and families with its quality, values-based program.

71 “BE” Module Two: How to do Your Job The Scoutmaster’s Vision of Success: Troop 175 shall be and shall continue to be successful when: The Scouts learn to be good leaders. The Scouts learn and practice basic scouting skills and thus advance to First Class. The Scouts continue with their personal growth by advancement towards Eagle Scout The Scouts plan, execute and are responsible for all troop activities. The Scouts practice the ideals of Scouting in the Scout Oath and Scout Law. The Scouts practice the Patrol Method. The Scouts are exposed to and associate with adults on a mature level. The Scouts realize personal growth. The Scouts learn to accept responsibility. The Scouts organize and communicate well.

72 Teaching the EDGE Discussion

73 EDGE (Explain, Demonstrate, Guide, Enable) is a process for training that will be taught in the NYLT course. This training will introduce EDGE as a teaching method at the troop level. The key to making EDGE work is to use it in all teaching situations. Module II

74 Teaching the EDGE Discussion Explain - The trainer first explains how the skill is done. Demonstrate – After explanation, the trainer demonstrates the skill while explaining it again. Guide - The Scout tries the skill as the trainer guides him. Enable - The Scout attempts the skill on his own. The trainer removes obstacles thus enabling the Scout to succeed. Module II

75 Troop Progress Discussion

76

77 What should we start doing that we are not currently doing? What do we stop doing that is not working? What should we continue doing that is working well and helps us succeed? Module II

78 Assignment

79 The foundation of the troop is the patrol. It is through the “Patrol Method” that Scouting succeeds. The key to this success is the PL. In order for the youth leader to effectively lead, he needs to get to know the Scouts he is responsible for leading. Your assignment as a youth leader is to take time to assess the needs of the Scouts you lead. Take time to discuss ways to better understand the needs of your patrol members. Module II

80 End Module II

81

82 Module III (DO) What Is Expected Of Me

83 Module III – What is expected of me (What the youth leader should DO) Position Descriptions and Expectations Servant Leadership - Motivating Scouts to Lead Defining Success in Your Position Scoutmaster Conference Module III

84 “DO” Module Three: What is expected of Me? Senior Patrol Leader. Assistant Senior Patrol Leader Patrol Leader Assistant Patrol Leader Troop Guide Quartermaster Scribe OA Troop Representative Historian Librarian Instructor Chaplain Aide Den Chief. Junior Assistant Scoutmaster.

85 Position Descriptions and Expectations

86 The PLC plans and runs the troop’s program and activities and gives long- range direction with the annual planning conference. The PLC should meet monthly to fine-tune upcoming events and should briefly meet (10 min.) after each troop meeting to review the next week’s meeting plan. The SPL conducts the PLC meeting and the SM should act only as a coach and resource. Module III

87 Position Descriptions and Expectations In Module I, the key leadership positions were discussed. Each youth leader needs to have a clear understanding of his position and the expectations of that position. Remember - The core of Scouting is to allow the Scouts, as leaders, to learn by doing. The Scouts must be allowed to develop and plan the troop’s program and take responsibility for achieving their goals and objectives. Module III

88 SENIOR PATROL LEADER Position description: The senior patrol leader is elected by the Scouts to represent them as the top junior leader in the troop. Reports to: The Scoutmaster. Senior patrol leader duties: Runs all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference. Runs the patrol leaders' council meeting. Appoints other troop junior leaders with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster. Assigns duties and responsibilities to junior leaders. Assists the Scoutmaster with junior leader training. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

89 ASSISTANT SENIOR PATROL LEADER Position description: The assistant senior patrol leader is the second highest-ranking youth leader in the troop. He is appointed by the senior patrol leader with the approval of the Scoutmaster. The assistant senior patrol leader acts as the senior patrol leader in the absence of the senior patrol leader or when called upon. He also provides leadership to other youth leaders in the troop. Reports to: The senior patrol leader Assistant senior patrol leader duties: Helps the senior patrol leader lead meetings and activities. Runs the troop in the absence of the senior patrol leader. Helps train and supervise the troop scribe, quartermaster, instructor, librarian, historian, and chaplain's aide. Serves as a member of the patrol leaders' council. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit. Lends a hand controlling the patrol and building patrol spirit. Wears the uniform correctly.

90 PATROL LEADER Position description: The patrol leader is the elected leader of his patrol. He represents his patrol on the patrol leaders’ council. Reports to: The senior patrol leader Patrol leader duties: Appoints the assistant patrol leader. Represents the patrol on the patrol leaders’ council. Plans and steers patrol meetings. Helps Scouts advance. Acts as the chief recruiter of new Scouts. Keeps patrol members informed. Knows what his patrol members and other leaders can do. Sets the example. Wears the uniform correctly. Lives the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

91 ASSISTANT PATROL LEADER Position description: The assistant patrol leader is appointed by the patrol leader and leads the patrol in his absence. Reports to: The patrol leader Assistant patrol leader duties: Helps the patrol leader plan and steer patrol meetings and activities. Helps him keep patrol members informed. Helps the patrol get ready for all troop activities. Represents his patrol at patrol leaders’ council meetings when the patrol leader cannot attend.

92 TROOP GUIDE Position description: The troop guide works with new Scouts. He helps them feel comfortable and earn their First Class rank in their first year. Reports to: The assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop Troop guide duties: Introduces new Scouts to troop operations. Guides new Scouts from harassment by older Scouts. Helps new Scouts earn First Class rank in their first year. Teaches basic Scout skills. Coaches the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol on his duties. Works with the patrol leader at patrol leaders’ council meetings. Attends patrol leaders’ council meetings with the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol. Assists the assistant Scoutmaster with training. Counsels individuals Scouts on Scouting challenges. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

93 TROOP QUARTERMASTER Position description: The quartermaster keeps track of troop equipment and sees that it is in good working order. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Quartermaster duties: Keeps records on patrol and troop equipment. Makes sure equipment is in good working condition. Issues equipment and makes sure it is returned in good condition. Makes suggestions for new or replacement items. Works with the troop committee member responsible for equipment. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

94 TROOP SCRIBE Position description: The scribe keeps the troop records. He records the activities of the patrol leaders’ council and keeps a record of dues, advancement, and Scout attendance at troop meetings. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Scribe duties: Attends and keeps a log of patrol leaders’ council meetings. Records individual Scout attendance and dues payments. Records individual Scout advancement progress. Works with the troop committee member responsible for records and finance. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

95 TROOP HISTORIAN Position description: The troop historian preserves troop photographs, news stories, trophies, flags, scrapbooks, awards, and other memorabilia. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Historian duties: Gathers pictures and facts about troop activities and keeps them in a historical file or scrapbook. Takes care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities. Keeps information about former members of the troop. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

96 TROOP LIBRARIAN Position description: The librarian oversees the care and use of troop books, pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge counselor lists. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Librarian duties: Sets up and takes care of a troop library. Keeps records of books and pamphlets owned by the troop. Adds new or replacement items as needed. Keeps books and pamphlets available for borrowing. Keeps a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out, and follows up on late returns. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

97 INSTRUCTOR Position description: The instructor teaches Scouting skills. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Instructor duties: Teaches basic Scouting skills in troop and patrols. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

98 CHAPLAIN’S AIDE Position description: The chaplain’s aide works with the troop chaplain to meet the religious needs of Scouts in the troop. He also works to promote the religious emblems program. Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader Chaplain aide duties: Assists the troop chaplain with religious services at troop activities. Tells Scouts about the religious emblem program for their faith. Makes sure religious holidays are considered during the troop program planning process. Helps plan for religious observance in troop activities. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

99 DEN CHIEF Position description : The den chief works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and den leaders in the Cub Scout pack. Reports to: The den leader in the pack and the assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop Den chief duties: Knows the purposes of Cub Scouting. Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks. Encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation. Assists with activities in the den meetings. Is a friend to the boys in the den. Helps out at weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings. Meets with adult members of the den, pack, and troop as necessary. Sets the example. Wears the uniform correctly. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

100 JUNIOR ASSISTANT SCOUTMASTER Position description: The junior assistant Scoutmaster serves in the capacity of an assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. He must be at least 16 years old and not yet 18. He is appointed by the Scoutmaster because of his leadership ability. Reports to: The Scoutmaster Junior assistant Scoutmaster duties: Functions as an assistant Scoutmaster. Performs duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster. Sets a good example. Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. Shows Scout spirit.

101 Servant Leadership - Motivating Scouts to Lead

102 Why should you become a leader?

103 Servant Leadership -Motivating Scouts to Lead Most youth will quickly discover that they would rather tell people what to do than be told what to do. Leadership in Scouting is often the opposite of this. Leadership in Scouting is not about giving orders. It’s about your choice to lead and to give rather than receive. Module III

104 Servant Leadership -Motivating Scouts to Lead Servant leadership is the concept that a leader is most effective if he cares about others and cares about helping them succeed. We are more willing to trust a leader that cares about the success of the group (patrol & troop) as a whole. Module III

105 Servant Leadership -Motivating Scouts to Lead Servant Leadership and the Patrol Method An effective PL will help each member of his patrol succeed. Servant leaders understand what success looks like for both the patrol as a group and for each patrol member. By understanding servant leadership and utilizing the patrol method, the troop succeeds. Module III

106 Servant Leadership -Motivating Scouts to Lead Keep in mind that each patrol member has personal goals and challenges. An effective PL will seek to know his patrol members well enough to understand these goals and challenges and will help them to succeed. The patrol’s and the troop’s success requires team work. A servant leader wants to lead so he can help make a difference within his troop. Module III

107 Servant Leadership -Motivating Scouts to Lead Servant leaders help their patrols through the day-to-day operation of a troop. Patrols are assigned tasks and duties by the SPL as a part of the troop. PL’s should focus on how to help Scouts in their patrol to be successful. The patrol then functions as a team to accomplish these tasks and duties more efficiently. Module III

108 Motivation Motivating Scouts to Lead Why be a Leader? Choice to give instead of receive. Servant Leadership. Helping Patrol succeed. Earn respect as a good leader. Providing Leadership (Pg 102 PLHB) Shared values (Oath and Law). Vision of success. Recognize diversity. Act the part. Draw on differences. Make meetings count. Respect others.

109 Effective Communications Effective Listening Start, Stop and Continue Matching Leadership Styles to Leadership Needs (EDGE) Key Leadership Skills (Pg 94, PLHB)

110 Leadership Skills Basics of Leadership (Pg 91 PLHB) Have a good attitude. Act with maturity. Be organized. Look the Part. How to be a Good Leader (Pg 13, PLHB) Keep your word. Be fair to all. Communicate. Be flexible. Be organized. Delegate. Set the example. Be consistent. Give praise. Ask for help. Have fun. EDGE Training (Pg 99 PLHB) Educate. Demonstrate. Guide. Enable. Progress Evaluation – SSC (Pg 98 PLHB) What do we STOP? What do we START? What do we CONTINUE?

111 Other Leadership Challenges (Pg 103PLHB) Patrol disappointments Putting out fires Celebrating success Conflict resolution Inappropriate behavior

112 How will I know I am leading well? (Pg 12 PLHB) You are doing your best. Review of patrol activities. Know your Patrol. Learn from successes and failures. E.D.G.E. S.S.C.

113 Defining Success in Your Position

114 Each youth leader should ask the question: “What does success look like for my troop?” you should then ask the question of : “How will I get there (goals)?” In considering these questions, keep in mind not only your personal goals and expectations but those of the PLC and troop. Module III

115 What is Your Vision of Success?

116 Defining Success in Your Position Take a few minutes and discuss what success is and ways to achieve troop and patrol goals. Distribute the accompanying Position Description Cards or position descriptions prepared by your unit. Module III

117 Scoutmaster Conference

118 New youth leaders, to better understand their goals and expectations, need the guidance of the SM. Personal coaching by the SM helps the SPL, ASPL, PL and TG to better understand the aims of Scouting and the what is expected of them by the adult leadership of the troop. The SM should help the youth leaders set their goals in order to achieve success. Module III

119 End Module III

120 “A leader is best when people barely know he exists; not so good when people obey and acclaim him; worse when they despise him. But a good leader who talks little when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say ‘we did it ourselves’.” Sun-Tsu Chinese philosopher

121 Congratulations You have successfully completed Troop Leadership Training You can know proudly wear the “Trained” patch.

122 You are now officially trained in your leadership position. For you as a leader, now the hard stuff starts. BE A GOOD ONE!


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