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CSCE 212 Chapter 3: Arithmetic for Computers Instructor: Jason D. Bakos.

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Presentation on theme: "CSCE 212 Chapter 3: Arithmetic for Computers Instructor: Jason D. Bakos."— Presentation transcript:

1 CSCE 212 Chapter 3: Arithmetic for Computers Instructor: Jason D. Bakos

2 CSCE Lecture Outline Review of topics from 211 Overflow Binary Multiplication Binary Division IEEE 754 Floating Point Floating-Point Addition and Multiplication MIPS Floating-Point

3 CSCE Review Binary and hex representation Converting between binary/hexidecimal and decimal Two’s compliment representation Sign extention Binary addition and subtraction

4 Addition CSCE 212 4

5 CSCE Lecture Outline Review of topics from 211 Overflow Binary Multiplication Binary Division IEEE 754 Floating Point Floating-Point Addition and Multiplication MIPS Floating-Point

6 CSCE Overflow Overflow for unsigned addition –Carry-out Overflow for unsigned subtraction –No carry-out Overflow for signed Overflow causes exception –Go to handler address –Registers BadVAddr, Status, Cause, and EPC used to handle SPIM has a simple interrupt handler built-in that deals with interrupts OperationOperand AOperand BResult A+BPositive Negative A+BNegative Positive A-BPositiveNegative A-BNegativePositive

7 CSCE Overflow Test for signed ADD overflow: addu$t0,$t1,$t2# sum but don’t trap xor$t3,$t1,$t2# check if signs differ slt$t3,$t3,$zero# $t3=1 if signs differ bne$t3,$zero, No_OVF xor$t3,$t0,$t1# signs of operands same, compare sign of result slt$t3,$t3,$zero bne$t3,$zero,OVF Test for unsigned ADD overflow: addu$t0,$t1,$t2# sum but don’t trap nor$t3,$t1,$zero# invert bits of $t1 (-$t1–1), $t1-1 sltu$t3,$t3,$t2# $t1-1 < $t2, < $t1+$t2 bne$t3,$zero,OVF

8 CSCE Lecture Outline Review of topics from 211 Overflow Binary Multiplication Binary Division IEEE 754 Floating Point Floating-Point Addition and Multiplication MIPS Floating-Point

9 CSCE Binary Multiplication 1000 x multiplicand multiplier product

10 CSCE Binary Multiplication

11 CSCE Binary Multiplication works with signed but must sign extend shifts

12 CSCE Multiplication Example multiplicand register (MR)product register (PR)next actionit LSB of PR is 1, so PR[7:4]=PR[7:4]+MR shift PR LSB of PR is 0, so shift LSB of PR is 1, so PR[7:4]=PR[7:4]+MR shift PR LSB of PR is 0, so shift PR is 45, done!X

13 CSCE Faster Multiplication

14 CSCE Lecture Outline Review of topics from 211 Overflow Binary Multiplication Binary Division IEEE 754 Floating Point Floating-Point Addition and Multiplication MIPS Floating-Point

15 CSCE Binary Division

16 CSCE Binary Division

17 CSCE Binary Division For signed, convert to positive and negate quotient if signs disagree

18 CSCE Division Example divisor register (DR)remainder register (RR)next actionit shift RR left 1 bit RR[7:4]=RR[7:4]-DR RR<0, so RR[7:4]=RR[7:4]+DR shift RR to left, shift in RR[7:4]=RR[7:4]-DR RR<0, so RR[7:4]=RR[7:4]+DR shift RR to left, shift in RR[7:4]=RR[7:4]-DR RR>=0, so shift RR to left, shift in RR[7:4]=RR[7:4]-DR RR<0, so RR[7:4]=RR[7:4]+DR shift RR to left, shift in shift RR[7:4] to right done, quotient=2, remainder=3

19 CSCE Lecture Outline Review of topics from 211 Overflow Binary Multiplication Binary Division IEEE 754 Floating Point Floating-Point Addition and Multiplication MIPS Floating-Point

20 CSCE Fixed-Point Need a way to represent fractional numbers in binary Fixed-point –Assume a decimal point at some location in a value: –Example: 6-bit (unsigned) value = 1x x x x x x2 -4 For signed, use two’s compliment –Range = [-2 N-1 /2 M, 2 N-1 /2 M – 1/2 M ] –For above, [-2 5 /2 4, 2 5 /2 4 -1/2 4 ]  [-2,2-1/16]

21 CSCE Precision Assume we have 4 binary digits to the right of the point… –Convert.8749 to binary… –.1101 =.8125 –Actual value – represented value =.0624 (bound by 2 -4 )

22 CSCE Floating Point Floating point represent values that are fractional or too large –Expressed in scientific notation (base 2) and normalized –1.xxxx 2 * 2 yyyy –xxxx is the significand (fraction) and yyyy is the exponent –First bit of the significand is implicit –Exponent bias is 127 for single-precision and 1023 for double-precision IEEE 754 standard –Single-precision (2x to 2x10 38 ) bit 31: sign of significand bit (8) exponent bit (23) significand –Double-precision (2x to 2x ) Significand is 52 bits and the exponent is 11 bits Exponent => range, significand => precision To represent: –zero: 0 in the exponent and significand –+/- infinity: all ones in exponent, 0 in significand –NaN: all ones in exponent, nonzero signficand

23 CSCE Conversion To convert from decimal to binary floating-point: –Significand: Use the iterative method to convert the fractional part to binary Convert the integer part to binary using the “old-fashioned” method Shift the decimal point to the left until the number is normalized Drop the leading 1, and set the exponent to be the number of positions you shifted the decimal point Adjust the exponent for bias (127/1023) When you max out the exponent, denormalize the significand

24 IEEE 754 CSCE

25 CSCE Lecture Outline Review of topics from 211 Overflow Binary Multiplication Binary Division IEEE 754 Floating Point Floating-Point Addition and Multiplication MIPS Floating-Point

26 CSCE Floating-Point Addition Match exponents for both operands by un-normalizing one of them –Match to the exponent of the larger number Add significands Normalize result Round significand

27 CSCE Example Assume 11-bit limited representation: –1 bit sign bit –6 bit significand (precision 2 -6 = ) –4 bit exponent (bias 7) range 1 x 2 -7 (7.8 x ) to x 2 8 (5.1 x 10 2 ) (assuming no denormalized numbers)

28 CSCE Accurate Arithmetic Keep 2 additional bits to the right during intermediate computation –Guard, round, and sticky Worst case for rounding: –Actual number is halfway between two floating point representations –Accuracy is measured as number of least-significant error bits (units in the last place (ulp)) IEEE 754 guarantees that the computer is within.5 ulp (using guard and round)

29 CSCE Floating-Point Addition Hardware

30 CSCE Floating-Point Multiplication Un-bias and add exponents Multiply significands –Move point Re-normalize Set sign based on sign of operands

31 CSCE Lecture Outline Review of topics from 211 Overflow Binary Multiplication Binary Division IEEE 754 Floating Point Floating-Point Addition and Multiplication MIPS Floating-Point

32 CSCE MIPS Floating-Point $f0 - $f31 coprocessor registers –Used in pairs for doubles Arithmetic: [add | sub | mul | div].[s | d] Data transfer: lwc1, swc1 (32-bits only) Conditional branch: –c.lt.[s | d] (compare less-than) –bclt (branch if true), bclf (branch if false) Register transfer: –mfc1, mtc1 (move to/from coprocessor 1, dest. is first)


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