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Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 Date: 05/08/06 Version 1.0.

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Presentation on theme: "Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 Date: 05/08/06 Version 1.0."— Presentation transcript:

1 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 Date: 05/08/06 Version 1.0

2 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 1 IPv6 Transition Agenda OMB Memorandum, Support & Guidance OMB Memorandum, Support & Guidance Network Architecture Definitions & Models Network Architecture Definitions & Models The NASA IPv6 Transition Approach The NASA IPv6 Transition Approach The 4 Phases of NASA’s IPv6 Transition project The 4 Phases of NASA’s IPv6 Transition project Project Formulation & Approval (Phases 1 & 2) Project Formulation & Approval (Phases 1 & 2) Requirements Gathering & Workflow Analysis Requirements Gathering & Workflow Analysis Phase 3 – Architecture and Design Phase 3 – Architecture and Design Phase 4 - Implementation, Test & Acceptance Phase 4 - Implementation, Test & Acceptance IPv6 Challenges IPv6 Challenges

3 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 2 OMB Memorandum Instruction to Agencies By November 15, 2005  Identify an IPv6 agency lead  Complete 1st inventory of IP-aware hardware devices in network backbone By February 28, 2006  Develop a network backbone transition plan for IPv6  Complete an IPv6 progress report By June 30, 2006  Complete 2nd inventory of IP-aware applications and peripherals with dependencies on network backbone  Complete an IPv6 transition impact analysis By June 30, 2008  Complete network backbone transition to IPv6 [ Please read the notes section for more detail ]

4 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 3 Available Support to Agencies for IPv6 Transition Transition Planning Guidance Core.gov portal and collaboration space Address-space acquisition training Standards/guidelines development Acquisition guidance [ Please read the notes section for more detail ]

5 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 4 Currently Published IPv6 Guidance Chapter I – Integrating IPv6 into EA Planning Activities (released) Chapter II – Developing an IPv6 Transition Plan (released) Chapter III – Governance (released) Chapter IV – Acquisition/Procurement [ Please read the notes section for more detail ]

6 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 5 Definitions- LAN/MAN/WAN Model Wikipedia LAN:  A Local Area Network (LAN) is a computer network covering a small local area, like a home, office, or small group of buildings such as a home, office, or college. MAN:  Metropolitan Area Networks (MAN) are large computer networks usually spanning a campus or a city. They typically use wireless infrastructure or optical fiber connections to link their sites. For example, a university or college may have a MAN that joins together many of their LANs. They could have several WAN links to other universities or the Internet. WAN:  A wide area network or WAN is a computer network covering a wide geographical area, involving a vast array of computers. This is different from personal area networks, MANs, or LANs that are usually limited to a room, building or campus.

7 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 6 LAN/MAN/WAN Diagram Network Analysis, Architecture and Design, James D. McCabe MAN LAN WAN LAN

8 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 7 Definitions- Access/Distribution/Core Model Network Analysis, Architecture and Design, James D. McCabe Access (aka “Edge”):  The Access area is closest to the users and their Applications. The Access area is where most traffic flows are sourced (start) and sinked (terminate). Distribution:  The distribution area area is used to consolidate traffic flows. It can also source and sink flows, but the flows are usually for servers or other specialized devices. Few users connect directly to the Distribution Area. Core (aka “Backbone”):  The core of the network is used for bulk transport of traffic. Traffic flows are not usually sourced or sinked at the core. External Interfaces & DMZs  Aggregation points for traffic flows external to that network

9 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 8 Access/Distribution/Core Diagram Network Analysis, Architecture and Design, James D. McCabe Distribution Access Core Access

10 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 9 NASA IPv6 Project Approach Mandate could be interpreted for Minimalist transition approach: - The NASA WAN - NASA Center interfaces to the WAN - Center Networks & all IP devices based on Business Case Mandate could be interpreted for a Moderate transition approach: - The NASA WAN - NASA Center interfaces to the WAN - Center Networks & all IP devices based on Business Case - Center Networks & all IP capable devices Mandate could be interpreted for an Extreme transition approach: - The NASA WAN - NASA Center interfaces to the WAN - Center Networks & all IP devices based on Business Case - Center Networks & all IP capable devices - All IP addressable devices within the control or purview of NASA Mandate from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for all agencies to implement IPv6 by June 30, 2008 Regardless of the approach chosen, the necessary work has to be efficiently identified and managed

11 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 10 NASA IPv6 Project Life Cycle - 4 Phases Requirements Gathering Architecture And Design Requirements And Workflow Analysis Implementation, Test, and Acceptance Project Formulation and Approval

12 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 11 Project Formulation & Approval Project Formulation And Approval 1. Project Initialization 2. High-Level Information 3. Stakeholder Identification 4. Project Seed 5. Problem Statements 6. Objectives 7. Requirements The 7 steps of the Project Formulation and Approval process are the sub-steps to complete the first two (1 & 2) phases of the IPv6 Project Life Cycle.

13 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 12 Project Formulation & Approval The 7 Project Formulation and Approval steps can be accomplished with considerable overlap Between them. They do not occur in a strictly serial fashion 1. Initialization Select program Executive, Project Manager and Requirements Manager. They will then develop the full IPv6 team, determine project Identification, and designate/create the collaboration and data collection points. 2. High-Level Information Project leadership leads the development project description, scope, objectives, operating principles, requirements, goals, deadlines to accept problem statements, and baseline terms/definitions and high-level project timeline for completion. 3. Stakeholder Identification Project leadership will lead the selection of project stakeholders to include executives, financial managers, technical representatives and others as necessary. Stakeholders will review the project documentation, review problem statements and make recommendations.

14 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 13 Project Formulation & Approval (Continued) 4. Project Seed It is usually necessary to develop a set of initial problem statements, objectives and requirements in order to kick off the project and germinate stakeholder interaction. Project leadership will formulate and provide these project “Seeds” to the project community. 5. Problem Statements These are the set of issues, vetted by the stakeholders, to be resolved by project completion. The Objectives will map to the problem statements and the project requirements will map to the objectives. Thus the requirements map a clear line of sight relevancy to the problem statements. 6. Objectives These provide detailed, specific areas to be addressed in support of project problem statements. These are reviewed by the stakeholders and the project community. 7. Requirements These are the most specific and detailed items to be addressed in support of the objectives and problem statements. Each requirement must have clear and achievable metrics.

15 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 14 Architecture & Design Transition Plan NASA will need to interface/communicate with newly emplaced NASA and Non-NASA devices that are allocated only IPv6 Addresses. NASA will need to communicate with NASA and Non-NASA devices that continue to operate on the old, IPv4 standards. NASA needs to provide transport for devices developed to only operate in IPv6 mode. All devices will eventually become IPv6 but this may take decades. In the meantime, we must transition to some level by June 30, 2008 Transition Plan Considerations:

16 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 15 Architecture & Design Transition Plan (continued) NASA Objective: Establish basic IPv6 capability in network devices located at NASA peering points, WAN backbone, and Center LAN backbones. Basic IPv6 capability is defined here as being able to transport and route in dual-stack (IPv4 and IPv6) mode, and that all devices that are configured in dual-stack mode must be able to interoperate with each other. DEADLINE: June 30, 2008

17 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 16 Architecture & Design Transition Plan (continued) 1. Define the sets of network devices that constitute NASA Peering Points, WAN Backbone, and Center LAN Backbones. The most challenging area will be Center LAN Backbones. 2. Determine the current level of IPv6 capability for each set of network devices. 3. Develop a risk assessments of operating in dual-stack mode and IPv4 to IPv6 translation. 4. Upgrade or purchase network devices as necessary to bring each set up to basic IPv6 capability as described above. 5. Demonstrate IPv6 routing, transport, and interoperability across NASA Peering Points, WAN Backbone, and Center LAN Backbones. 6. Evaluate the effectiveness and requirements of, and issues with, IPv4 to IPv6 translation. 6 Major Steps to Meet NASA Objective

18 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 17 IPv6 Challenges Available Budget & Time Gathering Accurate Information IP addresses that only have local significance and are not advertised outside their local networks Devices with hardwired addresses Important architecture devices that are not, and will never be, IPv6 capable (Security Firewalls for example) Variance across the agency in capabilities as budget becomes available

19 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv Gbps lambda SONET OC48 (2.5 Gbps) SONET OC12 (622 Mbps) SONET OC3 (155 Mbps) CIEF Midwest JPL DFRC ARC Core Lambda Services CIEF Bay HQ LRC GSFC DC CIEF MAF WSTF SSC KSC CIEF South East MSFC JSC CIEF South Central GRC WSC Architecture & Design “To-Be” Mission Support Backbone (WANR) CIEF – Carrier Independent Exchange Facility DC – District of Columbia Midwest – Chicago Bay – San Francisco South Central – Dallas South East - Atlanta

20 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 19 PIP Core Router OC-3 Fast Ethernet Gigabit Ethernet OC-12 ATM Switch Peering Router NISN ATM Backbone Public Internet Center LAN Router LAN – Local Area Network WAN – Wide Area Network Offsite location (“tail circuit”) Router As needed Center Campus Integration Router Failover Switch Addresses from PIP passed to Public internet as needed NASA Data Center SIP Core Router Offsite location Architecture & Design “As-Is” IP Center Architecture (PIP/SIP)

21 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 20 PIP Core Router OC-3 Fast Ethernet Gigabit Ethernet OC-12 Peering Router WANR Optical Core Public Internet Center LAN Router Offsite location (“tail circuit”) Router As needed Center Campus Integration Router Failover Switch Addresses from PIP passed to Public internet as needed NASA Data Center SIP Core Router Offsite location MSPP High Performance Router (HPR) NetOptics Fiber Tap MSPP – Multi-Service Performance Platform Architecture & Design “To-Be” IP Center Architecture (PIP/SIP) These Key Devices will be upgraded to IPv6. All Others will be based on a Business Case.

22 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 21 HPR – High Performance Router MSPP – Multi-Service Performance Platform “To-Be” PIP/SIP Architecture HPR – High Performance Router MSPP – Multi-Service Performance Platform Architecture & Design: Potential “To-Be” IP Network Model Architecture Everything shown in this Architecture diagram is either Optical or will be upgraded to native IPv6 in the NASA IPv6 transition plan

23 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 22 Implementation, Test And Acceptance Phased Implementation plan as time and budget allow Lab and bench testing wherever possible. Network testing at most available hours Test each segment twice before going live Accept only after thorough, documented testing.

24 Effectively and Efficiently Managing the Transition to IPv6 23 Questions ?? Dr. John McManus – NASA Chief Technology Officer (CTO) NASA Chief Enterprise Architect (CEA) NASA Deputy Chief Information Officer (DCIO) ESMD Chief Architect Phone: Ken Griffey – NASA Deputy Chief Enterprise Architect NSSC Chief Enterprise Architect Phone:


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