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University of the Virgin Islands St. Thomas Campus SIOP: Sheltered Instruction for Language Development in the ESL Classroom! Dr. Migdalia Cruz de Arthurton.

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Presentation on theme: "University of the Virgin Islands St. Thomas Campus SIOP: Sheltered Instruction for Language Development in the ESL Classroom! Dr. Migdalia Cruz de Arthurton."— Presentation transcript:

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2 University of the Virgin Islands St. Thomas Campus SIOP: Sheltered Instruction for Language Development in the ESL Classroom! Dr. Migdalia Cruz de Arthurton Dr. John E. C. Hill

3 WHO ARE WE?

4 Dr. Migdalia Cruz de Arthurton Adjunct Professor at the University of the Virgin Islands in the School of Education. Dr. Cruz Arthurton has been an educator for the past 36 years. She has been an English teacher, English Supervisor, Counselor, Program Coordinator and District Coordinator in the public school system. Dr. Cruz Arthurton has presented in Guatemala, Barbados, Dominican Republic, St. Kitts and Puerto Rico.

5 Dr. John E. C. Hill Dr. Hill is an Associate Professor at the University of the Virgin Islands in the School of Education. Dr. Hill has been an educator for the past 35 years. He has been a Principal, an Associate Vice- President of Academic Affairs, Dean of Under-Graduate School of Studies and Admission, and Dean of a number of Graduate Schools in several universities. Dr. Hill has presented in the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean.

6 Activity One

7 Our Objectives for this Workshop... Content Objective: (WHAT) You will be able to understand at least 2 grouping considerations and 2 engagement strategies that you can use to increase interaction in your classroom Language Objective: (HOW) You will be able to share (speak) with a colleague about how you want to implement at least one of today’s strategies

8 SIOP Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol

9 What is the SIOP Model? A variety of strategies, techniques, and materials for making grade-level core curriculum (reading, science, social studies, math) more accessible for English language learners (ELL) while at the same time promoting their English language development.

10 The Eight Components of the SIOP Model Preparation Building Background Comprehensible Input Strategies Interaction Practice & Application Lesson Delivery Review & Assessment Today’s Topic!

11 Component 5 Interaction

12 Frequent opportunities for interactions and/or discussion between teacher/student and among students that encourage elaborated responses about lesson concepts Grouping configurations support language and content objectives of the lesson Sufficient wait time for student response Ample opportunities for students to clarify key concepts in L1 as needed with aide, peer, or L1 text What does SIOP say about Interaction?

13 Interaction Opportunities for Interaction Group Configurations and Activities Wait Time Clarify Concepts in L 1

14 Benefits of Interaction Increases use of academic language Improves quality of student talk Encourages elaborated responses Provides “oral rehearsal” Helps individualize instruction Encourages reluctant learners to participate Allows for written interaction with dialogue journals Promotes a positive social climate

15 Cooperative Learning Type of group to set up – Random – Voluntary – Teacher assigned Changing groups – Frequency – Management Group roles – Group recorder – Materials collector – Reporter – Final copy scribe – Illustrator – Timekeeper – Cheerleader/facilitator – Monitor – Messenger

16 Different grouping configurations have different advantages and disadvantages. Best to vary how you group learners to make the most of these differences. Sometimes weak learners can benefit from working with stronger students. ELLs may be able to accomplish a task that would be too difficult for them to carry out on their own under the guidance of another more proficient student. This follows Vygotsky’s zone of proximal development (ZPD). According to Vygotsky this is the most active and productive site of language acquisition. It does little good to ask learners to perform tasks that they cannot do at all. Instead, they should be encouraged to observe, listen, and gradually begin to collaborate in the activity, finally doing the task themselves. Help from peers is a necessary step on the way to language acquisition. The teacher can’t provide this guidance for every student all the time so pair ELLs with stronger peers. But, remember, if this is always the grouping, the weaker student may not have the needed opportunity to interact. Sometimes matching students of similar ability is best. Homogeneous grouping according to language proficiency might be effective (when working on a particular language structure that novices esp. need to learn). Also, when possible, make the ELL the expert – in math, art, construction English language proficiency is not the only criterion for grouping. Sometimes grouping should make the ELL the “expert” – in math, drawing, construction. Sometimes pair students with the same L1 to clarify concepts. Grouping Configurations For training the teachers: birthdays by season birthplace by geography taught in NC only vs. elsewhere For teaching the students: Group students to support language and content objectives Teacher can choose groupings or can allow students to choose (methods for teacher choice on next page…) If you choose to have students choose teams, to avoid having some students always be picked last, let last few students pick the group instead of having the team captain pick the students Grouping Configurations  individual work  partners  triads  small groups of 4 or 5  whole group  homogeneous or heterogeneous  gender  language proficiency  language background  ability

17 Cooperative Learning Activities Information gap activities Jigsaw Four corners Numbered heads together Round robin/roundtable Questionnaires & interviews Three-step interview Story summaries Literature study groups Writing headlines Science & math investigations Think pair share

18 Interaction Techniques for the Class room Turn to your partner Foreheads in the middle Volunteer your partner Explain a process to your partner Choral reading, reader’s theatre, drama play Another example: 2 lines w/ position, question (e.g., “There should be laws vs. no laws” & have lines face each other to discuss).

19 Activity Two: The Wright Family How did this activity make you feel? What did your group do? Who can tell me what the story was about? Why or why not? If the goal was comprehension, what could I have done differently? Do our activities support learning outcomes?

20 Think About These Activities.... Building a device following written instructions Writing a thank you note Deciding on where to build a new park Writing and illustrating a story Retelling a story Deciding how to spend $50,000 won in the lottery Interpreting results of science experiments

21 Review Learning Targets… Content Objective: (WHAT) You will be able to understand at least 2 grouping considerations and 2 engagement strategies that you can use to increase interaction in your classroom Language Objective: (HOW) You will be able to share (speak) with a colleague about how you want to implement at least one of today’s strategies

22 Reference Echevarría, J., Vogt, M., Short, D. (2013). Making content comprehensible for English learners: The siop model. New York: Pearson Education Inc.

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