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ISLN January 2013. Before We Get Started Brainstorm with your district members: How are you measuring student growth in your district? What assessments.

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Presentation on theme: "ISLN January 2013. Before We Get Started Brainstorm with your district members: How are you measuring student growth in your district? What assessments."— Presentation transcript:

1 ISLN January 2013

2 Before We Get Started Brainstorm with your district members: How are you measuring student growth in your district? What assessments are you using?

3 Targets  I can explain why student growth goals are included in the new teacher effectiveness system.  I can communicate and support the student growth goal setting process.  I can identify the current status of implementation of student growth goals in my district/school and use available resources to determine next steps.

4 Why Measure Student Growth?

5 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Flexibility Waiver

6 Six Components continuous improvement of instruction meaningful differentiation of teacher/principal performance using at least three performance levels multiple measures of effectiveness including use of student growth data (both state standardized tests and formative growth measures that are rigorous and comparable across schools in a district) as a significant factor regular evaluation clear and timely feedback to include opportunities for professional development use of the system to inform personnel decisions

7 No public reporting of individual teacher data Not supporting student growth as a single measure for personnel decisions Agreement that an educator effectiveness model focused on continuous improvement is only beneficial if the data and information from the system are used to improve instructional practices leading to improved student learning outcomes Kentucky Commitments

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10 “Learning goals give meaning to and act as a healthy check on the traditionally untethered tendency for public institutions to be satisfied with processes, regardless of outcomes.” ~ Schmoker (1999, p.30)

11 Past Evaluations Seniority High Level of Principal Input Degrees Earned

12 “If a goal of evaluating teachers is to ensure student learning, then student learning must be a major part of what’s measured.” ~MET Study

13 MET Study Suggests … Rigorous Classroom Observations Student Feedback School Working Conditions Pedagogical Content Knowledge Student Growth MET Study

14 Proposed Multiple Measures Teacher Professional Growth and Effectiveness System Observation Peer Observation formative Professional Growth Self Reflection Student Voice Student Growth All measures are supported through evidence. State Contribution: Student Growth % Local Contribution: Student Growth Goals

15 Student Growth

16 Student Growth Measures in Kentucky’s Field Test State Contribution Student Growth Percentiles – applies to grades 4 – 8 reading and math Local Contribution Student Growth Goal – applies to all teachers

17 Goal Setting for Student Growth: Honoring Progress and Getting Results © 2012, Stronge & Grant. Used with permission.

18 Student Growth Process Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

19 Step 1: Determining Needs Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

20  Previous years’ data  Conversations with previous teachers  Formative assessment processes  Student work Getting a Baseline Measurement When getting a baseline measurement, a teacher would need to take into account: In order to determine what assessment needs to be administered to gather evidence of students’ current level of performance

21 Which assessments work best for goal setting for student growth?

22 Assessments  Be rigorous – Have high expectations for progress toward college and career readiness Provide data toward mastery of overarching skills/concepts based on standard(s) The measures in state non-tested subjects and grades are as rigorous as those in tested subjects and grades.

23  Provide data between two points in time (pre-/post-assessment) Provide baseline data Provide post data by end of goal- setting period  Be comparable across similar classrooms within or across districts Assessments

24 Not a unit assessment Addresses skills and concepts students need to develop across the year

25 Let’s look at the list that you created at the beginning of our time together today. What assessments are being used in your district that meet this criteria? Rigorous? Overarching skills or concepts? In assessed and non-assessed areas? Data between (at least) two points? Comparable across similar classrooms?

26 Data Source Possibilities Interim Assessments LDC/MDC Classroom Assessments Projects Products Student Portfolios Student Portfolios Student Performances Common Assessments District Assessments

27 Data Source Possibilities Interim Assessments Classroom Assessments Projects Products Student Portfolios Student Portfolios Student Performances Common Assessments District Assessments Aligned to Standards Descriptive Rubrics Overarching Skills & Concepts Overarching Skills & Concepts Comparable across Classrooms

28 Assessment Inventory Worksheet: Which assessments might your teachers use for goal-setting?

29 Continue the discussion in your district. Which assessments might your teachers use for goal-setting for student growth?

30 “Just about everyone realizes that if a teacher does a great instructional job, that teacher’s students will usually perform better on tests. It’s the other side of the equation that’s less often understood, namely that how a teacher tests — the way a teacher designs tests and applies test data — can profoundly affect how well that teacher teaches.” From Test Better, Teach Better W. James Popham Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2003

31 Step 2: Creating Goals Using the SMART Process Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

32 SMART Goal Process S Specific- The goal addresses student needs within the content. The goal is focused on a specific area of need. M Measurable- An appropriate instrument or measure is selected to assess the goal. The goal is measurable and uses an appropriate instrument. A Appropriate- The goal is clearly related to the role and responsibilities of the teacher. The goal is standards-based and directly related to the subject and students that the teacher teaches. R Realistic- The goal is attainable. The goal is doable, but rigorous and stretches the outer bounds of what is attainable. T Time-bound- The goal is contained to a single school year/course. The goal is bound by a timeline that is definitive and allows for determining goal attainment.

33 Student Growth Goal Sample Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Assesses overarching concepts of the discipline? Specific? Measurable? Appropriate? Realistic/Rigorous? Time-bound? Includes all students? Comparable across classrooms? Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: _4_ 25% 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

34 Student Growth Goal Sample Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate needs assessment? Assesses overarching concepts of the discipline? Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: _4_ 25% 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

35 Student Growth Goal Sample Checklist for Goal Quality Specific? The goal addresses student needs within the content. The goal is focused on a specific area of need. Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: _4_ 25% 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

36 Student Growth Goal Sample Checklist for Goal Quality Measurable? An appropriate instrument or measure is selected to assess the goal. Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: _4_ 25% 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

37 Student Growth Goal Sample Checklist for Goal Quality Appropriate? The goal is clearly related to the role and responsibilities of the teacher. This goal was written by an 8 th grade Language Arts teacher. Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: _4_ 25% 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

38 Student Growth Goal Sample Checklist for Goal Quality Realistic/Rigorous ? The goal is doable, but rigorous and stretches the outer bounds of what is attainable. Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: _4_ 25% 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

39 Student Growth Goal Sample Checklist for Goal Quality Time-bound? Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: _4_ 25% 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

40 Student Growth Goal Sample Checklist for Goal Quality Includes all students? Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: _4_ 25% 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

41 Student Growth Goal Sample Checklist for Goal Quality Comparable across classrooms? Baseline Data: Writing Baseline data on an 8 th grade school wide writing assessment utilizing the LDC argumentative writing rubric: Score: _4_ 25% 45% 30% 0% Overall, 30% of students scored a “3” or better. Student Growth Goal: For the school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in argumentative writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in three or more areas of the LDC writing rubric. Furthermore, 80% of students will score a “3” or better overall.

42 Remember: You need to KNOW your students in order to critique the goal.

43 Step 3: Creating and Implementing Strategies Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

44 Step 4: Monitoring Student Progress and Making Adjustments Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

45 Monitoring Student Progress: An ongoing formative assessment process Monitor both student progress toward goal attainment AND strategy effectiveness through formative assessment processes Make adjustments to strategies as needed Goals are not adjusted; Strategies are adjusted

46 Step 5: Determining Goal Attainment Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

47

48 Conversations to have….. 1. Examine Assessments Do we have quality assessments that  provide data to measure student growth  meet the waiver criteria -rigorous and comparable -two data points in time 2. Plan for inclusion of all subject/content areas  Common assessments  Unique circumstances 3. Provide Training Assessment Literacy  Identifying needs/choosing appropriate assessment  Data analysis  Use of formative assessment SMART Goal Process 4. Utilize PLCs to support Teacher Effectiveness System

49 How can you structure time and facilitate conversations to support leader and teacher understanding of student growth? Sample PLC Schedule – Meeting #1: Identify the Need – Meeting #2: Identify the SMART Goals – Meetings #3: Correlate Promising Practices with Current Practices – Meeting #4: Plan Professional Development – Meeting #5: Analyze Results and Refocus Efforts O’Neill, J. and Conzemius, A. (2006).The Power of SMART Goals: Using Goals to Improve Student Learning Blooming, IN: pp , Solution Tree Press.

50 How can you deepen your understanding? Winter Summit Winter Summit – February 2013: Specific dates vary by location (Feb 5 th : BG; Feb 6 th : KDV) Other Research-Based Resources – The Power of SMART Goals: Using Goals to Improve Student Learning Jan O’Neill and Anne Conzemius – Student Achievement Goal Setting: Using Data to Improve Teaching and Learning James Stronge and Leslie Grant

51 KDE Resources – KDE Home Page TPGES Field Test District Page, ges/pges-field-test-districts-.aspx ges/pges-field-test-districts-.aspx TPGES Overview from Summer Trainings, ges/pges--overview-series.aspx ges/pges--overview-series.aspx CIITS/EDS Resources, https://powersource.pearsonschoolsystems.co m/portal/ciits/pges-field-test/ https://powersource.pearsonschoolsystems.co m/portal/ciits/pges-field-test/ Mean to an End ments/means to and end templates (5).doc ments/means to and end templates (5).doc

52 Contact Information Branch Manager, Office of Next Generation Professionals Effectiveness Coach


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