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CHILD CARE IN ONONDAGA COUNTY Jonnell Allen Syracuse Community Geographer Syracuse University Department of Geography Peggy Liuzzi Executive Director Child.

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Presentation on theme: "CHILD CARE IN ONONDAGA COUNTY Jonnell Allen Syracuse Community Geographer Syracuse University Department of Geography Peggy Liuzzi Executive Director Child."— Presentation transcript:

1 CHILD CARE IN ONONDAGA COUNTY Jonnell Allen Syracuse Community Geographer Syracuse University Department of Geography Peggy Liuzzi Executive Director Child Care Solutions, Inc.

2 Background  Mapping request submitted by Child Care Solutions to the Syracuse Community Geographer in July 2006  Project aim: examine geographic accessibility of child care in Onondaga County

3 Research Questions 1. How do the geographic locations of childcare providers in Onondaga County compare to the density of children in Onondaga County? 2. Is there adequate licensed and regulated childcare in low income neighborhoods? 3. Where are providers located that operate during nontraditional business hours?

4 Caveats  Residents of Onondaga County may use child care in neighboring counties.  Research suggests that parents utilize care options near to their residence or work place.  Population data are from the 2000 census and may not reflect current population trends.  Accessibility is multi-faceted; this research explores geographic accessibility, only.  Availability of child care changed dramatically in one-year.

5 Demographics

6 Onondaga County Under 5 Years Population Total Under 5 Population% Change% of Total PopulationTotal Population , , , , (est.) 30, , (est.) 26, , (est.) 28, , (est.) 28, , (est.) 27, ,328 Onondaga County 5-14 Years Population Total 5-14 Population% Change% of Total PopulationTotal Population , , , , (est.) 66, , (est.) 69, , (est.) 63, , (est.) 62, , (est.) 61, , Population in Onondaga Co.

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8 Syracuse Under 5 Years Population Total Under 5 Population% Change% of Total PopulationTotal Population , , , , (est.) 10, ,495 Syracuse 5-14 Years Population Total 5-14 Population% Change% of Total PopulationTotal Population , , , , (est.) 18, , Population in Syracuse

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10 From 1990 to 2000, the under age 10 population declined 6.1% from 68,057 to 63,903 in Onondaga County. Census tracts that lost or gained 30% or more of their under 10 population are highlighted. North Syracuse and South Campus lost more than one- half of their under 10 population, while the eastern valley of Syracuse and the Onondaga Nation increased by over 100%.

11 Onondaga County Poverty Rates (est) Percent of families with related children under 18 years below poverty level13.3%16.9% (+/-2.4%) Percent of families with related children under 5 years below poverty level18.6%26.6% (+/-8.2%) Percent of families with female householder, no husband present with children under 18 years below poverty level36.4%40.4% (+/-5.8%) Percent of families with female householder, no husband present with children under 5 years below poverty level54.0%55.7% (+/-15.4%) Percent of individuals with related children under 18 years below poverty level15.5%18.7% (+/-2.7%) Percent of individuals with related children 5 to 17 years below poverty level13.9%17.1% (+/-3.3%)

12 Syracuse Poverty Rates (est.) Percent of families with related children under 18 years below poverty level31.1%40.9% (+/-4.9%) Percent of families with related children under 5 years below poverty level40.5%50.6% (+/-12.4%) Percent of families with female householder, no husband present with related children under 18 years49.5%59.5% (+/-8.4%) Percent of families with female householder, no husband present with related children under 5 years64.1%73.0% (+/-16.4%) Percent of individuals with related children under 18 years below poverty level35.1%44.6% (+/-6.7%) Percent of individuals with related children 5 to 17 years below poverty level32.2%41.7% (+/-8.5%)

13 Early Care and Education Provider Definitions  Child Care Centers: Care is provided for children ages 6 weeks to 12 years in a non-residential facility for more than 6 children in a group setting.  Family Child Care Homes: Care is provided by one (1) adult caregiver in an occupied residence for up to eight (8) children. Programs can enroll children ages six weeks to 12 years.  Group Family Child Care Homes: Care is provided in an occupied residence for up to fourteen (14) children. A licensed provider must have an assistant when there are more than six (6) children present. Programs can enroll children ages six weeks to 12 years.  School-Age Child Care: Program for children ages 5 to12 years in a group setting before and after school, school holidays and summer vacation. Care is provided in a variety of settings such as elementary schools, churches, community centers and child care centers.  Head Start and Early Head Start: A federally funded program for children that meets 4 to 5 days per week during the school year. Head Start enrolls children 3 to 5 years of age. Early Head Start is a program for pregnant women and children ages birth to three years. The program serves primarily low income families for part-day or school day sessions. Head Start offers support services to families and encourages parent involvement through regular home visits, volunteering in the program and special activities. Transportation may be available.  Pre-Kindergarten: The NYS Department of Education funds Experimental and Universal Pre-Kindergarten programs for 4 year-olds in some school districts during the school year. Pre-Kindergarten is a part-day program, but in some cases, the program is run by and/or housed at a child care center or that can offer a full day option to children.  Nursery School/Pre-School Programs: Programs that serve children ages 3 to 5 years old in a variety of settings: public and private schools, churches, community centers, and home residences. Programs may meet anywhere from 1- 5 days per week for less than three hours per session and follows the school year calendar. Programs are generally non-regulated.

14 Mapping Early Care and Education Providers Provider Type Total(2006)Total(2007) Child Care Centers6163 Family Child Care Homes Group Family Child Care Homes School-age Child Care6062 Head Start/Early Head Start11 Syracuse Universal Pre-Kindergarten 43

15 2006 – 61 child care centers, 11 Head Start 2007 – 63 child care centers, 11 Head Start 11% increase in child care centers Child Care Centers

16 From September 2006 through September 2007: - 4 centers closed, - 2 centers relocated, and - 6 new centers opened. Closures occurred in Syracuse, Liverpool and Cicero. One center relocated from Liverpool to Cicero. The other relocated center reopened near to its prior location.

17 Currently, 63 centers have the capacity to serve 5,631 children. Approximately 31% of all slots are designated for infants and toddlers (children 2 years and younger).

18 P.E.A.C.E. Inc., Head Start LocationCapacity Baldwinsville 34 Cicero 34 Dunbar Center 17 James St. 34 Jordan-Elbridge 17 Lafayette 34 Merrick 213 North Area 34 Rockwell Elementary 34 St. Brigid’s 100 Sumner School 117 Total

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20 2006 – 306 family child care homes 2007 – 254 family child care homes 2006 – 101 group family child care homes 2007 – 107 group family child care homes Home-based Child Care

21 Home-based off-hour care  17.5% of home-based child care providers offer some type of off-hour care  14% of family child care providers  25% of group family child care providers  311 requests for off-hour care referrals made to Child Care Solutions from 8/1/2006 to 8/1/2007.  Evening: 152  Weekends: 100  Overnight: 34  Flexible hours: 15  Extended hours: 5  Rotating: 5

22 School-age Care 2006 – 60 school-age care providers 2007 – 62 school-age care providers 24 child care providers have slots for 5-12 year olds

23 From September 2006 through September 2007: - 4 centers closed, - 2 centers relocated, and - 6 new centers opened. Closures occurred in Syracuse, Liverpool and Cicero. One center relocated from Liverpool to Cicero. The other relocated center reopened near to its prior location.

24 Universal Pre-Kindergarten Universal Pre-Kindergarten Capacity and Enrollment in Syracuse CapacityEnrollment Percent Overall Enrollment Rate Community-based Pre-K (n = 23) % School-based Pre-K (n = 20) % Total1,5131, %

25 43 UPK sites had the capacity to serve 1,513 children in ,311 children were enrolled, yielding an overall enrollment rate of 86.6%. Five out of 23 community- based pre-K sites had less than a 50% enrollment rate in Nov None of the school-based pre-K sites had less than a 50% enrollment rate.

26 Most children living in Syracuse are within ½ mile of a UPK site. Exceptions are in north, northeast, western, and the Valley. Notable low access areas include Washington Square neighborhood where upwards of 300 families receive childcare subsidies and the eastern portion of the Valley where the population of 0-10 year olds increased 130% between 1990 and 2000.

27 Onondaga County provides families with help to pay for child care: in a child care center, in a family child care home, or with a trusted relative or friend. Subsidized Child Care

28 Subsidy Eligibility Requirements Parents must work 20 or more hours per week and have incomes below these limits to qualify: Family Size234 Gross Annual Income $27,382$34,342$41,300

29 Child Care CentersCost per week Age GroupMin $Max $Avg $ 6 Weeks - 18 Months Months - 35 Months Years Years Years Years Family Day Care and Group Family Day Care (Home-based Providers)Cost per week Age GroupMin $Max $Avg $ 6 Weeks - 23 Months Months - 35 Months Years Years Average Cost of Child Care

30 Child Care Subsidies From 1/1/2006 until 10/1/07, Onondaga County Dept. of Social Services reported 4,642 child care subsidy cases.  1,972 (42.5%) non-service subsidies (families receiving public assistance)  2,670 (57.5%) service subsidies (income-eligible families not receiving public assistance)

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33 3 Head Start programs in high- need school districts are currently under-enrolled. The Head Start program provides grants to local public and private non-profit and for- profit agencies to provide comprehensive child development services to economically disadvantaged children and families, with a special focus on helping preschoolers develop the early reading and math skills they need to be successful in school.

34 Approximately families living in Washington Square, the Near Westside and Brighton made use of child care subsidies from Jan 1, 2006 through October 1, 2007.

35 High-need neighborhoods have few child care centers, UPK programs and Head Start programs located directly within the neighborhood.

36 Concluding Remarks

37 Geographic Access  Examine UPK and Head Start Program under- enrollment in high-need areas.  Investigate the need for, and expansion of, off-hour care both in the city and surrounding areas.  Examine whether public transportation is an important means of getting children to child care and if existing public transportation meets the needs of parents.

38 Questions for Providers How can child care providers respond to growth in UPK services for 4 year-olds and plans to serve 3’s? What would it take to increase infant and toddler capacity in regulated care? What would it take to increase part-day and part- week options in regulated care? What would it take to encourage more providers to offer off-hour care?

39 Recommendations to DSS  Reimburse infant and toddler care at State market rate to increase supply for subsidized families.  Pay enhanced market rate for off-hours care.

40 Policy & Research Recommendations  Create local “think tank” to study mapping data and develop specific recommendations.  Fund a comprehensive research study to learn more about child care demand and how well local child care responds to family needs.  Explore role that businesses and economic planners can play in developing child care that meets specific work force needs.

41 Recommendations (cont’d) Ultimate goal - create a 5-year strategic plan to:  Improve planning for child care and after-school services  Facilitate collaborative planning and service delivery  Strengthen child care delivery system  Respond more effectively to changing family needs

42 Presentation and downloadable maps will be available at Thank You


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