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Dr. David Fitzpatrick Research Interests. Presentation Outline  Introductory Comments  Academic Qualifications  Academic Work Experience  Personal.

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Presentation on theme: "Dr. David Fitzpatrick Research Interests. Presentation Outline  Introductory Comments  Academic Qualifications  Academic Work Experience  Personal."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dr. David Fitzpatrick Research Interests

2 Presentation Outline  Introductory Comments  Academic Qualifications  Academic Work Experience  Personal Information  Overview of Early Eclectic Studies  Major Research Focus  Questions/Comments

3 Academic Qualifications: Graduate/Undergraduate Degrees  Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) University of Alberta  Master of Education (M.Ed.) University of Manitoba  Educational Administration  Master of Education (M.Ed.) University of Manitoba  Curriculum and Instruction  Special Education Certificate - Manitoba Education  Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) University of Manitoba  Certificate in Education (Ed. Cert) University of Manitoba  Bachelor of Physical Education (BPE) University of Manitoba

4 ACADEMIC EMPLOYMENT HISTORY  Teacher, Winnipeg School Division ( )  Consultant, Manitoba Dept. of Education ( )  Instructor, Physical Activity and Sport Studies ( )  Associate Professor, Kinesiology ( present)  Coordinator, Physical Activity and Sport Studies ( )  Chair, Kinesiology and Applied Health ( )  Interim Associate Dean, Social Science (2005)  Acting Associate Dean, Faculty of Arts ( )  Associate Dean, Faculty of Arts (July, 2006)  Acting Dean, Faculty of Arts (Oct June 2007)

5 Recent External Grants  Goodwin, Connelly, Hall, C. & Fitzpatrick, (Collaborator), “The Other Adult in Inclusive Physical Education Settings: Helping or Hindering?” Social Sciences Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) ($116,800) - In progress  Watkinson & Fitzpatrick (Co-investigator), “Children’s’ Affective Memories of Recess”, University of Alberta, Humanities, Fine Arts and Social Sciences Research Operating Grant. ($6,000.00) - In progress  Goodwin, Fitzpatrick, (Co-investigator) & Hall, “The Meaning of Special Olympics Participation to the Families of Children with Mental Disabilities”, Canadian Special Olympics ($10,000) – Published (Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly )

6 Recent Internal Grants  UW Travel Grant ($1000)  Canada Work Study Grant ($932)  UW Special Research Grant ($2000)  UW International Travel Grant ($2000)  UW Major Research Grant ($2500)  Canada Work Study Grant ($800)  UW Travel Grant ($1000)  Canada Work Study Grant ($712)  Canada Work Study Grant ($694)  UW Discretionary Grant ($600)  UW Travel Grant ($500)  UW International Travel Grant ($1500)  Canada Work Study Grant ($700)

7 Significant Creative Accomplishment

8 Motor Behaviour Motor Development

9 Manitoba Schools Physical Fitness Survey Studied selected fitness, performance, and anthropometric measures of 10,000 K-12 public school students in a geographic random sample of 700 Manitoba schools –Largest survey of it type worldwide –Established Manitoba norms and percentiles –Established Minimal Performance Standards –Evidence of low fitness among Manitoba Students – Member of research team of five who designed, conducted, and analyzed results

10 Basic Movement Skills (BMS) Assessment Instrument Developed BMS Observation Profile Developed Group Screening Protocol Developed Individual Test Protocol Confirmed test validation Established Inter-rater reliability Efficacy of teacher administering profile Remedial program development Part of Early Identification Program (EIP) 25,000 observations on 8,000 students

11 Other Early Studies Daily Physical Education Project –Pre - Post intervention with control Experimental school showed favourable gains Families Play to Grow –Enhancing participation for children with disability Families were more active one year following program Active Living Alliance for Canadians With a Disability (Research Sub-Committee) –PE participation of Students with Disability High percentage of SWD have a negative PE Experience

12 Moving To Inclusion Series of 10 disability specific curriculum resources distributed to 15,000 Canadian schools and over 25 countries. “Among the most comprehensive and practical adapted physical education resources developed” (Dr. Julien Stein)

13 Report of the Analysis October 1999 In cooperation with: The Manitoba Physical Education Supervisors’ Association The Manitoba Physical Education Teachers’ Association David Fitzpatrick University of Winnipeg Survey of Selected Physical Education and Health Teaching Variables in Manitoba Schools

14 Recommended Minutes of PE per Cycle % above150 + % Below 150-  Gr % 70.1%  Gr % 70.1%  Gr % 69.4%  Gr % 69.4%  Gr % 64.6%  Gr % 64.6%  Gr % 55.4%  Gr % 55.4%

15 Minutes of PE by Grade Minutes Mean Minutes of PE per cycle by Grade Grade

16 Positive and Negative Experiences In Physical Education Class: What Students Say A Presentation to the: Western Canadian Physical Education Supervisors’ Conference Winnipeg, Manitoba February 9, 2000 David Fitzpatrick University of Winnipeg

17 Physical Education Experiences Descriptive Writing Exercise 1. Describe a positive or rewarding incident from your school physical education experience. 2. Describe a negative or disappointing incident from your school physical education experience.

18 The Lived Experience of Physical Awkwardness: Views From Various Perspectives Major Research Path Dr. David Fitzpatrick

19 Physical Awkwardness or DCD Physical awkwardness, also known as Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), is an unexplained impairment in the development of motor coordination.

20 “Awkward” Research Questions  What is it like to be physical awkward?  How do students who are physically awkward cope with their awkwardness?  What is it like to teach PE to students who are physically awkward?  How do those who are physically awkward view their bodies?

21 Heuristic Benefits  Not all may fully appreciate what it is like to experience awkwardness  Others may benefit from personal insight  Need for more tactful teaching/coaching  Research has not identified a definitive instructional intervention for DCD

22 Qualitative Methodology Hermeneutic Phenomenology  A qualitative research method, that seeks to describe, explain, and understand the meaning of human experiences.

23 The Lived Experience of Physical Awkwardness: Adults’ Retrospective Views International Symposium on Adapted Physical Activity (ISAPA) Vienna, Austria July 3, 2001 David A. Fitzpatrick University of Winnipeg Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

24 Describing Awkwardness  “When other people say … they can't play, … it means they can't play very well. If I say I can't play, it really means, ‘I can't play’!”  “There are people who are athletes, and people who are non-athletes, and then there is me.”  “Baseball … I couldn’t throw. I couldn’t catch. I couldn’t bat. That doesn’t leave much.”

25 Invariant or Essential Themes of Experiencing Awkwardness “Failing and Falling” “Hurt and Humiliation” “Worrying and Wondering” “Avoiding Awkwardness”

26 Telling Quotes  “I was on the ground more than I was standing.”  “I had to take my turn at serving. I was totally humiliated, being so unskilled.”  “Why can’t I throw a ball like a regular human being?”  “I took three Sciences, three Maths, two English and Russian History so there wasn't room for PE.”

27 Avoiding Awkwardness: A Subversive Activity Presentation to the: NAFAPA 2002 Conference Corvallis, Oregon September 27, 2002 David Fitzpatrick University of Winnipeg Adults’ Reflections of Childhood Coping Strategies

28 Physical Education is Public The child is in a position of being acclaimed or humiliated by an authority from whose decision there is no recourse and in a group from which there is no escape (Wood, 1983, p. 220).

29 Cognition and Avoidance “ I was a klutz, but I was a thinking klutz, so I learned how to hide most of it.”

30 Avoiding Awkwardness Varied Involvement  Compliance/Trying hard  Supportive others  Selective participation  Pseudo participation  Hiding within activity  Humour  Emotional Response  Illness  Misrepresentation  Doing other things  Actively avoiding PE  Refused/Rebelled  Gave Up/Did not try  Didn’t care/Accept it Involved Uninvolved

31 Pseudo-Participation, Substitution, Teacher Criticism  “Just run around and as long as you don't get the ball, you don't worry about getting ‘swacked.’”  “I did a school history compilation. I missed a lot of PE.  “No one ever taught me … I had no help from my ‘teachers’.”

32 The Experience of Teaching Students Who are Physically Awkward SCAPPS Hamilton David A. Fitzpatrick University of Winnipeg October 18, 2003

33 Invariant Themes  Recognizing Students who are Awkward  Empathic Awareness  Answering the Challenge  Hopeful Expectations  Frustrations  Occasional Success

34 Strategies Employed  Promoting success  Encouragement  Choice  Individual attention  Physical guidance  Modifications  Individual activities  Peer Teaching  Groups/Partners  Volunteers  Pull out programs  Practice  Mass participation  Gradual competition

35 Effective Instruction Guidelines  Warm and Orderly Environment  Realistic, High, Achievable Outcomes  Promote Student Choice and Control  Structured Instruction  Demonstrate Expectations  Group Students and Use Stations  Ask and Encourage Questions  Maximize Practice and Success  Circulate and Monitor Progress  Provide Feedback (Vogel & Seefeldt 1988)

36 International Symposium on Adapted Physical Activity (ISAPA) Verona, Italy July 5, 2005 David A. Fitzpatrick University of Winnipeg, Canada Experiencing Physical Awkwardness: Conflicting Accounts of Teachers and Students

37 Presentation at the Biannual Symposium of the North American Federation of Adapted Physical Activity (NAFAPA) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor October 14, 2006 David A. Fitzpatrick University of Winnipeg, Canada Societal Disaffection with Unskillfulness: Atypical Physical Performance and the Imperfect Body

38 Naturalistic Observations of Voluntary, Self-generated, Incidental Physical Activity at Selected Sites on the University of Winnipeg Campus Work Study in Progress  Only 10% of the University of Winnipeg Community opt to take stairs when an elevator or and escalator is available.

39 With thanks Questions/Comments? The Beginning


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