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“This isn’t art class and yet …”: How drawing can enhance language learning Kathleen Montgomery Purdue University Calumet INTESOL 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "“This isn’t art class and yet …”: How drawing can enhance language learning Kathleen Montgomery Purdue University Calumet INTESOL 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 “This isn’t art class and yet …”: How drawing can enhance language learning Kathleen Montgomery Purdue University Calumet INTESOL 2014

2 Take one minute to draw a moment during your trip to this conference. Show someone near you. How did you feel while drawing and sharing your drawing? Exercise

3 Affective filter  A person’s affect toward the language has an effect on whether or not language input can be used for acquisition.  When the filter is lower, more acquisition occurs. (Krashen, 1982) Affective filter

4 lowering affective filter Drawing in class additional SLA or pedagogical benefits Benefits of drawing activities

5 1.Beginning-level reading comprehension 2.Grammar processing tasks 3.Input for oral story Activities with additional benefits

6 Students show understanding of a story by drawing it in a series of panels. Beginning-level reading comprehension

7 1.Designate number of panels to draw graphic organizer at edhelper.comedhelper.com 2.Assign line or paragraph numbers to each panel 3.Draw the first picture to help with scaffolding Steps

8 1. Promotes comprehension of ideas rather than translation of individual words 2. Allows teacher to assess student comprehension, which is more difficult at lower-levels:  comprehension questions may pose reading challenge  receptive understanding before productive expression 3. May provide opportunity to address misunderstanding ITBE Link article: Drawing Tasks for Beginning-Level ReadersDrawing Tasks for Beginning-Level Readers Benefits

9 Example 1 3. He then saw a sign on a boat. It said, “San Juan.” Anthony looked around. He didn’t see any people, so he got on the boat. There were some large boxes on the boat. He got into a box and closed it. After a few minutes, he heard some men on the boat. Soon the boat started to move. Through some holes in the boxes, Anthony could look out. He saw the buildings of Seattle, and then he saw only the sea. (Jeffries, 2009, p. 33)

10 Example 2 3. She went to the telephone, and she pushed some numbers. A man answered her call. He was an engineer named Claude Armand. His office was in the city. He didn’t know Camille, and at first, he didn’t understand her. But he had children, and he understood there was a problem. (Jeffries, 2009, p. 32)

11 Create minimal pairs in which the grammatical differences change the meaning. Please draw these two statements: #1 The baby dog was stolen. #2 The baby dog stole. Grammar processing tasks

12 The baby dog stole.The baby dog was stolen.

13 Requires students to notice the form  allows the form to become intake (the part that gets noticed and processed) Processing instruction: instructional technique that prompts learners to create intake input where they may not have without intervention (Van Patten 1996) Benefits

14 1.Design around two commonly contrasted grammar forms - active vs. passive - simple past vs. past continuous 2.Create two sentences in which these grammar forms appear as a minimal pair (nothing else should be different) 3.Ask students to draw and assist with problems 4.Show class samples Steps

15 Another example (past continuous)

16 Students use a series of pictures to remind themselves of a story they will tell. Input for oral story

17 1.Assign topic as homework and give panel for drawing pictures 2.In class, use pictures to tell story - as a presentation - in a group - or with a partner Steps

18 1.Provides scaffolding for remembering details of their story. 2.Steers them away from memorization and towards more natural speech. Benefits

19 Jeffries, L., & Mikulecky, B. (2009). Basic reading power 1: Extensive reading, vocabulary building, comprehension skills, thinking skills (3rd ed.). White Plains, NY: Pearson Longman. Krashen, S. (1982). Principles and practice in second language acquisition. London: Pergamon. Montgomery, K. (2014). Drawing tasks for beginning-level readers. ITBE Link, 42 (3). Retrieved from article_ htm VanPatten, B. (1996). Input processing and grammar instruction in second language acquisition. New Jersey: Ablex Publishing Corporation. References

20 Kathleen Montgomery Purdue University Calumet Other ideas? Questions?


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