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DR. FIONA HALLETT – EDGE HILL UNIVERSITY, DR. DAMIEN SHORTT – EDGE HILL UNIVERSITY, DR. DAVID SPENDLOVE – UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER. DR. GRAHAM HARDY –

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Presentation on theme: "DR. FIONA HALLETT – EDGE HILL UNIVERSITY, DR. DAMIEN SHORTT – EDGE HILL UNIVERSITY, DR. DAVID SPENDLOVE – UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER. DR. GRAHAM HARDY –"— Presentation transcript:

1 DR. FIONA HALLETT – EDGE HILL UNIVERSITY, DR. DAMIEN SHORTT – EDGE HILL UNIVERSITY, DR. DAVID SPENDLOVE – UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER. DR. GRAHAM HARDY – UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER. The General Teaching Council (England) Code of Conduct and Practice: myth and meaning.

2 The GTCE and the CoCP Teaching and Higher Education Act – GTCE to maintain a register of all those teachers qualified to teach in state-maintained schools (currently in excess of 500,000) to serve in an advisory capacity on educational matters to Government departments to perform a disciplinary function for the profession CoCP 2008 – Revised draft CoCP 2009 – Revised CoCP

3 The 8 principles of the CoCP. ‘guide everyday judgments and actions’ (GTCE, 2009:02) Put the wellbeing, development and progress of children and young people first Take responsibility for maintaining the quality of their teaching practice Help children and young people to become confident and successful learners Demonstrate respect for diversity and promote equality Strive to establish productive partnerships with parents and carers Work as part of a whole-school team Co-operate with other professional colleagues Demonstrate honesty and integrity and uphold public trust and confidence in the teaching profession. (GTCE, 2009:07)

4 Contravening the Code Romantic relationship with a sixth form student over the age of consent Shouting excessively, showing favouritism and ridiculing pupils Failing to plan lessons properly, failing to collaborate with colleagues, failing to produce pupil data, having insufficient strategies for managing pupil behaviour. Accessing a BNP discussion forum on a school computer Using facebook / ebay on school computers / during lessons (iphone)

5 Purpose of this paper. identify a core dichotomous tension at the heart of the Code of Conduct and Practice for Registered Teachers (GTCE, 2009). Structuralist analysis – reveals underlying moral judgements and binary relationships. mythologised representation of teacher professionalism or competence demands critique.

6 Structuralism and mythology Saussure (1986: 65-78) sign, signal and signification. Cat the sign [cat] can only function if all English speakers are complicit in their acceptance that this particular sign refers to that particular animal – in other words, there needs to be a community of speakers who are willing to have the rules of the language imposed upon them (1986: 71)

7 Structuralist notions of Myth Claude Lévi-Strauss ( ) myth as a narrative genre (often with didactic functions) seeks to acquire a deeper understanding of the meaning of various cultural texts and thereby to better understand the society that created them. Roland Barthes ( ) contemporary acts of myth-making for political and ideological ends seeks to use Structuralism to reveal the potential for pernicious ideologies to disguise themselves in seemingly neutral discourses.

8 Structuralist Methodology The sociological purpose of a myth is to function as ‘a kind of logical tool’ which helps a society to handle problems where experience and theory contradict each other (Lévi-Strauss, 1968: 216)

9 Lévi-Strauss’s Methodology the meaning of a myth does not reside in isolated elements, but in the ‘way those elements are combined’, in the exact same way in which the rest of language is made of up constituent units - ‘mythemes’ (1968: 211) the deeper understanding of myths can only be accessed if the text is read both diachronically and synchronically

10 Reading a myth Synchronically 1. identify the various constituent units from which the myth is comprised 2. identify which constituent units are related to each other, and assign them an identifying marker

11 Myth tabulation

12 The 8 principles of the Code of Conduct Put the wellbeing, development and progress of children and young people first Take responsibility for maintaining the quality of their teaching practice Help children and young people to become confident and successful learners Demonstrate respect for diversity and promote equality Strive to establish productive partnerships with parents and carers Work as part of a whole-school team Co-operate with other professional colleagues Demonstrate honesty and integrity and uphold public trust and confidence in the teaching profession. (GTCE, 2009:07)

13 Principle 1Principle 2Principle 3Principle 4Principle 5Principle 6Principle 7Principle 8 Use professional expertise and judgement Meet the professional standards for teaching Uphold children and young people’s rights Act appropriately towards all children and young people, parents, carers and colleagues. Provide parents and carers with accessible and accurate information about their child’s progress Endeavour to develop productive and supportive relationships with all school colleagues Seek to understand the roles of other professional colleagues Exercise responsibilities in relation to examination and assessment. Ensure the safety and wellbeing of children and young people. Develop their practice within the framework of their school’s curriculum Listen to children and young people, and involve them in decisions that affect them. Comply with school policies relating to equality, inclusion, access and bullying Involve parents and carers in important decisions about their child’s education Exercise any leadership and management responsibilities in a respectful, inclusive and fair way. Communicate and establish productive working relationships Demonstrate honesty and integrity in management and administrative duties. Follow the school’s child protection policies and procedures. Base their practice on knowledge of their subject area/s and specialism. Have high expectations of all children and young people, whatever their background or aptitudes. Address unlawful discrimination, bullying, and stereotyping no matter who is the victim or the perpetrator Consider parents’ and carers’ views and perspectives. Uphold school policies and procedures, and raise any concerns about the life or running of the school. Be clear about their own professional contribution to joint working, The duty to safeguard children and young people comes first, but otherwise acknowledge the rights of confidentiality. Establish and maintain appropriate professional boundaries in relationships with young people Make use of assessment techniques, set appropriate learning objectives; employ a range of teaching methodologies. Clarify how assessment will be used to support improvement, providing clear feedback, and celebrating success Take steps to improve the wellbeing, development and progress of those at risk of exclusion or under- achievement Follow school policies and procedures on communication with and involvement of parents and carers.. Provide honest, accurate, and justifiable comments when assessing the performance of, colleagues Always act within their own competence and responsibilities. Represent their professional status accurately and avoid taking advantage of their professional position

14 Mytheme identification In order to ascertain mythemes, and the core relationships between them, it is necessary to assign a very short descriptor for each column and continuously refine these descriptors, whittling their variety down, until we are left with some core relationships that the eight principles of the Code appear to be addressing and seeking to regulate.

15 Structuralist analysis of the Code and Conduct of Practice for Registered teachers. MythemesThe rights of children to protection. The duty of teachers to teach well The rights of children to be respected The rights of children to be nurtured The duty of the state to respect the rights of parents The duty of the state to respect the rights of the wider workforce and community The rights of teachers to value their own role and the work of others. The duty upon teachers to behave in a fitting manner. PrinciplesPrinciple 1 Principle 2 Principle 3 Principle 4 Principle 5 Principle 6 Principle 7 Principle 8

16 Structuralist analysis of the Code and Conduct of Practice for Registered teachers. Mytheme relation- ships Rights of the child vis-à-vis duties of the teacherRights of the teacher as citizen vis-à-vis duties of state institutions MythemesThe rights of children to protection. The duty of teachers to teach well The rights of children to be respected. The rights of children to be nurtured The duty of the state to respect the rights of parents The duty of the state to respect the rights of the wider workforce and community The rights of teachers to value their own role and the work of others. The duty upon teachers to behave in a fitting manner. PrinciplesPrinciple 1Principle 2Principle 3Principle 4Principle 5Principle 6Principle 7 Principle 8

17 Discussion In the first four principles of the Code the teacher is positioned in somewhat familiar terms that embrace the ‘moral heart of teaching’ (Hansen, 2000, 2001) signifying, above all, the duty of the teacher to preserve the inalienable rights of the child. However, in the second four principles the teacher is signified as vulnerable to temptation via individual interpretation of notions of honesty, integrity and professionalism.

18 The role of teacher educators? As such, the Code presents a space in which we can raise questions regarding the inherent contradictions of the modern condition: we are free, private, individuals but we are also constrained /limited/dependent/social animals. How far should teacher educators explore such tensions with student teachers? What would be the benefit of this?

19 Professional and ethical challenges in teaching A resource for trainee teachers and educators

20 References Barthes, Roland (2009) Mythologies. UK: Vintage. Dottin, E.S (2009) Professional judgment and dispositions in teacher education Teaching and Teacher Education General Teaching Council for England GTCE (2009) Code of Conduct and Practice for Registered Teachers. UK: GTCE Hansen, David T. (2000) Teaching as a moral activity. In: V.A Richardson (ed) Handbook of research on teaching. (4 th Edition) Washington D.C: American Educational Research Association. Hansen, David T. (2001) Exploring the moral heart of teaching: Toward a teacher’s creed. NY: Teachers College Press Lévi-Strauss, Claude (1968) The Savage Mind. UK: Penguin. Saussure, Ferdinand de (1986) Course in General Linguistics. USA: Open Court


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