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COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Nike Audu & Geoff Barton Thursday, April 02, 2015 PowerPoints available to download at www.geoffbarton.co.uk.

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Presentation on theme: "COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Nike Audu & Geoff Barton Thursday, April 02, 2015 PowerPoints available to download at www.geoffbarton.co.uk."— Presentation transcript:

1 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Nike Audu & Geoff Barton Thursday, April 02, 2015 PowerPoints available to download at

2 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING The Day: 1.Education coaching: its impact on whole- school, teacher and pupil performance 2.Essential coaching skills for the classroom 3.Developing the micro-skills of teaching 4.Structuring effective lessons 5.Top tips

3 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING SESSION ONE Education Coaching: Its impact on whole-school, teacher and pupil performance

4 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Whole-school culture: Some opening assumptions Michael Fullan: “20 years in teaching is … 1 year, repeated 20 times”

5 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Good teaching is a set of learnable skills, not a God-given gift Performance management is about performance We should encourage experimentation and occasional disasters We should be intolerant of mediocrity A genuine evaluation culture builds reflection Real change comes from within Whole-school culture: Some opening assumptions

6 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING How…? Whole-school culture: Some opening assumptions

7 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Have a clear view of what the essential skills of teaching / tutoring / behaviour are Map them out Build everything else around them Whole-school culture: Some opening assumptions

8 Peak performance will happen when you permit your imagination to study, explore and grow. Motivation is training or programming the creative mind to desire or expect the best, plan and work for the best. Whatever you do in life, you are going to work hard for it, so you might as well choose to work hard for what you really love and want to do. Education means awareness and use of what works. Things that work have a pattern, and this can be learned thoroughly and applied 1 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING

9 SESSION TWO Essential Classroom Coaching Skills: Listening, modelling & thinking skills Performance coaching to raise pupils’ aspirations Techniques for change: Overcoming barriers to learning

10 The Magic of Goal Setting Research shows that people who have achieved success in different walks of life had precisely written goals or ‘well formed outcomes’-WFO in (NLP literature) SMART :- Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic,Time-phased Why does goal setting work? We think and behave in a way consistent with our beliefs Get pupils to write down goals and review them regularly (create the opportunity) 2

11 How our brain works The Reticular Activating System (R.A.S.) Thoughts (Self-talk) Comfort zone (Feelings and emotions) 5, ex 2

12 Coaching works Value of beliefs and attitudes · Reticular Activating System (R.A.S) and observations ·  Thought forms and self-talk (Neuro-linguistic Programming) · Feeling and emotions (comfort zones) 5 ex 3

13 Links between beliefs, thoughts, feelings and experience 7: bridge

14 Techniques for change Positive listings and reflection- a simple strategy to reinforce positive beliefs, thoughts, feelings and perceptions Reframing - a powerful strategy for changing negative feelings and the effect on performance Create powerful anchors – as expressive holding forms Pattern breaking (distraction from the negative, attention on the positive technique) Imagination – a natural ability to bring to mind what is seen, heard and felt Rational analysis – an objective analysis o f objects Learning Log - (contact book, diary, visual journal) Music and Symbols (Image, logo-NIKE, theme songs, anthems) 7

15 Emotional barriers and solutions Negative memories (Trigger: recurrence of negative performance memories -will lead to negative self-talk & emotional discomfort, the R.A.S. will notice things that are negative, poor results & that reinforce the memory) Negative expectations - pupils project negative expectations of their future A limiting belief (can be challenged & then create a better one) Inappropriate emotions (fear, anxiety etc triggered by an external threat) Other damaging thought patterns as barriers: jealousy, Self sabotage, unrealistic competitiveness, mindless gossip and lack of discipline Judgemental beliefs and attitudes: Educated desire means programming for positive results, self- confidence and high self- esteem. Goal setting for desired outcomes – using a ‘solution focused’ approach or systematic approach to a ‘Well-formed outcome’ 7/8

16 The Magic of Goal Setting Research shows that people who have achieved success in different walks of life had precisely written goals or ‘well formed outcomes’-WFO in (NLP literature) SMART :- Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic,Time-phased Why does goal setting work? We think and behave in a way consistent with our beliefs Get pupils to write down goals and review them regularly (create the opportunity) 8

17 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Nike Audu & Geoff Barton Thursday, April 02, 2015 PowerPoints available to download at

18 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING SESSION THREE Developing the Micro-skills of Teaching: Creating a self-evaluation culture What are the skills and qualities that effective teachers have? How to make these explicit and build staff development around them?

19 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Part One: Creating a self-evaluation culture

20 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Creating a self-evaluation culture: My 3 gurus Carol FitzGibbon (Durham): Get data into school life, without necessarily doing anything with it

21 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Creating a self-evaluation culture: My 3 gurus John MacBeath (Cambridge): “We should measure what we value, not value what we can measure”

22 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Creating a self-evaluation culture: My 3 gurus David Reynolds (Exeter): Aim to be a ‘high-reliability’ organisation …

23 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Such complex social organizations as air traffic control towers continuously run the risk of disastrous and obviously unacceptable failure. The public would heavily discount several thousand consecutive days of efficiently monitoring and controlling the very crowded skies over Chicago or London if two jumbo jets were to collide over either city. Through fog, snow, computer-system failures, and nearby tornadoes, in spite of thousands of flights per day in busy skies, such a collision has never happened above any city, a remarkable level of performance reliability …

24 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING … By contrast, in the U.S., one of the most highly educated nations on earth, within any group of 100 students beginning first grade in a particular year, approximately 16 will not have obtained either their high school diploma or a General Education Development certificate years later. In Britain, just under half of all 16-year-old pupils will not have the benchmark of 5 or more high grade public examination passes in the national system. Obviously, many nations have even lower levels of educational performance.

25 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Creating a self-evaluation culture: Therefore, for me, … Whilst coaching is about teacher development It’s also about student entitlement to good teaching

26 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Creating a self-evaluation culture: Forms of self-evaluation: Student performance data - results, targets, etc Ethos data Questionnaires and focus groups Faculty reviews - inc observation sheets … plus … 21-27

27 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Creating a self-evaluation culture: Bedding this in as genuinely SELF-evaluation 8 -13

28 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING TALKING POINT How might you use these approaches in your own school?

29 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING The essential skills of good teachers TALKING POINT What do you think are the 3 most important ingredients of good teachers …? … and bad?

30 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING The essential skills of good teachers How to customise these for your school How to spell out the essential skills explicitly (staff handbook, differentiated training (eg literacy grid), review cycle, observation sheets How to develop a shared approach to observation, with protocols, and specific issues as focus using observation triads, questions rather than comments … 2-5

31 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING The essential skills of good teachers How do you feel the lesson went? Why did you start the lesson with activity X? How many students do you think took part in the discussion? Were you conscious of whether boys or girls answered? Why did you stand where you did for the plenary?

32 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING How to provide differentiated training? 8 -13

33 Eg: Essential Literacy

34 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING TALKING POINT 1.What are the good features of coaching in your school? 2.How well do you articulate a shared view of effective learning & teaching? 3.How do you ensure consistency across teams? 4.How do you develop the teaching skills of people at different phases? 5.What are your points for action?

35 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Nike Audu & Geoff Barton Thursday, April 02, 2015 PowerPoints available to download at

36 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING SESSION FOUR Understanding & Structuring Effective Lessons: Using coaching to improve behaviour Personalised learning & coaching: making it work in your classroom

37 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING What do we know about effective behaviour management? “Young people today think of nothing but themselves. They have no reverence for parents or old age.” Peter the Hermit, 1274

38 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Some principles: Good behaviour management is a prerequisite for effective teaching and learning Again, we can identify what effective teachers do We shouldn’t tip-toe round the issue A heavy focus on systems can create problems Keep it simple, and light Don’t use charismatic teachers as mentors Take a long-term approach: not quick hits 6/7

39 What we know from research into behaviour management … Reactive approaches to difficult behaviour can and do make matters worse. Schools make a difference: pupils’ behaviour does NOT simply mirror behaviour at home. There are higher rates of difficulty and exclusion in schools with lower confidence in their ability to handle the problem. Proactive schools have better behaviour – early intervention and preventative measures. Schools that form tight communities do better – spectrum of adult roles, engaging students personally and getting them involved. These schools have a more diffuse teacher role, with frequent contact between staff and students in contexts other than the classroom. Collaborative approaches lead to better behaviour – rather than individual teachers isolated. Schools that promote self-discipline and active involvement do better. Teachers engage in 1000 interactions or more a day. It is closest to being an air traffic controller. Teachers therefore react and make quick decisions. If they do not have a way of coping with the busyness they can experience tiredness and stress. The action teachers take in response to a ‘discipline problem’ has no consistent relationship with their managerial success in the classroom. However, what teachers do before misbehaviour occurs is shown to be crucial. In well-disciplined schools, teachers handle all or most of the routine discipline problems themselves. Indeed, the over-use of hierarchical referrals is a characteristic of high excluding schools. One of the most worrying assumptions is that if mild punishment does not prove effective, then we should try more severe punishment. In other words, one is led into a false escalation, rather like the postcard notice: “The beatings will continue until morale improves”. Chris Watkins, Institute of Education 16

40 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Develop a ‘house style’ Before: Set out expectations Model the behaviour and language you expect After: Give students choices Avoid the public arena by being prepared to defer issues 14/15

41 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING TALKING POINT What are the implications for your own school?

42 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING SESSION FOUR Understanding & Structuring Effective Lessons: Using coaching to improve behaviour Personalised learning & coaching: making it work in your classroom

43 Learning: performance strategies Promoting positive communication or rapport Developing Self-esteem Increasing motivation: setting learning goals, and the steps to get there i.e. performance goals - write it down Raising achievement is key Framing positive expectations Giving immediate and Positive feedback Listening / questioning Modelling, Thinking skills Making learning count (link to career, hobby and life goals) Accessing VAK Group work – Learning together Promoting recognition and responsibility for each pupil / learner Creating interesting and meaningful activities - Mind map, Games, Providing more choices Use curiosity / anticipation Promoting active reflection 9: reminder

44 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING SESSION FIVE Top Tips for Effective Coaching: The coaching process Creating a coaching culture

45 TOP TIPS: COACHING 1.Talk with them and listen, use the insight gained to modify your relationship, expectations and presentation 2.Be genuinely interested in your pupils 3.Learn alongside your pupils - Treat them as equal learners and prepare your lessons as you would if you were going to coach your team to win every time. 4.You must have a very high expectation of all your pupils and replace all negative judgemental attitudes –with a positive alternative and just observe and comment accurately on observation. 5.Define and focus your coaching goals –use the R.A.S to set up a desire (passion) for learning something new everyday, observe and note how you did it – identify your learning patter 11

46 TOP TIPS: A COACHING CULTURE 6.Start from your students’ entitlement to good teaching 7.Build a culture of constant, ongoing evaluation … 8. … plus a strong emphasis on SELF-evaluation 9.Develop a shared view of the essential skills teachers need 10.Develop a house style to develop them … and relentlessly aim for consistency

47 COACHING SKILLS FOR HIGH IMPACT TEACHING Thanks for listening! Thursday, April 02, 2015 PowerPoints available to download at


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