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How can you follow the plot of a long poem? Casey at the Bat by Ernest Lawrence Thayer The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville nine that day…

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Presentation on theme: "How can you follow the plot of a long poem? Casey at the Bat by Ernest Lawrence Thayer The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville nine that day…"— Presentation transcript:

1 How can you follow the plot of a long poem? Casey at the Bat by Ernest Lawrence Thayer The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville nine that day…

2 In this lesson, you will learn how understand a poem by retelling what happens in each stanza.

3 Let’s Review Poems have stanzas. “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville nine that day: The score stood four to six with just an inning left to play; And so, when Cooney died at first, and Burrows did the same, A sickly silence fell upon the patrons of the game. A straggling few got up to go, leaving there the rest With that hope that springs eternal within the human breast; For they thought if only Casey could get one whack, at that They'd put up even money, with Casey at the bat.

4 Let’s Review Sensory words can help us envision the setting of a poem.

5 A Common Mistake STOP Parts you don’t understand Parts you understand

6 Core Lesson “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville nine that day: The score stood four to six with just an inning left to play; And so, when Cooney died at first, and Burrows did the same, A sickly silence fell upon the patrons of the game. A straggling few got up to go, leaving there the rest With that hope that springs eternal within the human breast; For they thought if only Casey could get one whack, at that They'd put up even money, with Casey at the bat. What is happening here? The Mudville baseball team is losing. The game is almost over, and it’s not looking good. The Mudville baseball team is losing. The game is almost over, and it’s not looking good.

7 Core Lesson “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville nine that day: The score stood four to six with just an inning left to play; And so, when Cooney died at first, and Burrows did the same, A sickly silence fell upon the patrons of the game. A straggling few got up to go, leaving there the rest With that hope that springs eternal within the human breast; For they thought if only Casey could get one whack, at that They'd put up even money, with Casey at the bat. What is happening here? People are starting to leave. The fans want Casey because they think he’s a good hitter. People are starting to leave. The fans want Casey because they think he’s a good hitter.

8 Core Lesson Read one stanza. 1 2 Ask yourself, “What is happening here?” 3 Summarize the stanza.

9 In this lesson, you have learned how to understand a poem by retelling what happens in each stanza.

10 Guided Practice Read the next two stanzas of “Casey at the Bat.” Ask yourself, “What is happening?” Then summarize. But Flynn let drive a single to the wonderment of all, And the much-despised Blake tore the cover off the ball; And when the dust had lifted, and they saw what had occurred, There was Blake safe on second and Flynn a-hugging third! Then from the gladdened multitude went up a joyous yell, It bounded from the mountain-top, and rattled in the dell, It struck upon the hillside, and rebounded on the flat; For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat.

11 Extension Activities Pick a poem of your choice. Read each stanza carefully. Ask yourself, “What is happening here?” Then summarize.

12 Continue reading “Casey at the Bat.” Practice summarizing each stanza by asking “What is happening here?”

13 Summarize “Casey at the Bat” from beginning to end. Turn your summaries into a newspaper article describing the events of that day!

14 Quick Quiz Read two more stanzas of “Casey at the Bat.” Ask yourself, “What is happening?” Then summarize. And now the leather-covered sphere came hurtling through the air, And Casey stood a-watching it in haughty grandeur there; Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped: "That ain't my style," said Casey. "Strike one," the umpire said. From the benches, black with people, there went up a muffled roar, Like the beating of the storm-waves on a stern and distant shore; Kill him! Kill the umpire!" shouted some one in the stand. And it's likely they'd have killed him had not Casey raised his hand.


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