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Title III and ESOL 2013-2014 School Name:. The Most Frequently-used Acronyms  ESL = English as a Second Language (Studying English as a non-native speaker.

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Presentation on theme: "Title III and ESOL 2013-2014 School Name:. The Most Frequently-used Acronyms  ESL = English as a Second Language (Studying English as a non-native speaker."— Presentation transcript:

1 Title III and ESOL School Name:

2 The Most Frequently-used Acronyms  ESL = English as a Second Language (Studying English as a non-native speaker in a country where English is spoken).  ESOL = English to Speakers of Other Languages  ELL = English Language Learner  LEP = Limited English Proficiency (or Proficient)  ELL = English Language Learner  FEP = Fluent English Proficient (or Proficiency)  LEP = Limited English Proficient (or Proficiency)  LES = Limited English Speaker  LMS = Language Minority Student  NEP = Non English Proficient (or Proficiency)  LAS = Language Assessment Screener

3 IT’S THE LAW

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14 Différence between Title III and ESOL (English for Speakers of other Language) ESOL(English for Speakers of Other Language)  English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) is a state-funded instructional program for eligible English Learners (ELs) in grades K-12.  Home Language Survey  The ESOL program is a standards-based curriculum emphasizing academic and social language development.  Classroom teachers integrate these ESOL standards with the South Carolina Performance Standards to enable ELLs to both communicate in English and demonstrate their academic, social, and cultural proficiency.  Instructional approaches, both in ESOL and general education classes, ensure that the needs of South Carolina ELL’s are accommodated.  To the extent practicable, it is appropriate to use the ELL’s home language as a means of facilitating instruction and providing parents with school- related information. Tittle III  Title III is a federally-funded program that provides eligible Local Education Agencies with funding to supplement those ESOL services already in place. Title III is a federally-funded program that provides eligible Local Education Agencies with funding to supplement those ESOL services already in place.  Exiting Students  Parent Notification for Identification and AMAO Both ESOL and Title III hold students accountable for progress in, and attainment of, English language proficiency. Upon attainment of English language proficiency, students exit from supplemental language services.

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22 Process and Procedures

23 Identification of ELL  A home language survey is completed at the time of enrollment for every student who enters South Carolina Public Charter School District to determine if there is an influence of a language other than English. The school secretary, guidance counselor, or other designee as determined by the building principal will administer the survey. A bilingual translator is provided, if necessary, and when available. The survey identifies any languages other than English that are  first learned or acquired by the student;  used by the student in the home; or  used by parents in the home.

24 A Home Language Survey MUST given to every student that enrolls at your school and the Home Language Survey is a part of each students file. DO NOT PURGE SHOULD BE ON THE HOME LANGUAGE SURVEY! If you have DO NOT PURGE on the HLS, you do not have to collect it every year.

25 Enrollment  Kindergarten and 1 st grade require proof of age  Other documentation can be used for all students as proof of age such as:  Baptismal records, signed affidavit from parents, and other alternative forms of proof of age as determined by the LEA.

26 Assessment of ELL Assessments of English language proficiency must be conducted to accomplish two purposes: 1.To determine the student’s level of English proficiency. 2.To make appropriate instructional and program placement decisions.  Annual English proficiency test (ELDA) scores are used at the beginning of each school year to determine placement and services for returning students and can be used during the 30 day window at the beginning of school for new students to the district if their ELDA scores from the previous Spring administration can be obtained in time from their previous district.  In addition, students will receive ongoing informal assessments of their progress. Each student’s English proficiency will be assessed annually through the state assessment program.

27 Assessment of English Language Proficiency  If applicable, the school should request ELDA (The English Language Development Assessment) or other English proficiency assessment scores from the student’s previous district(s). For additional information regarding ELDA, please see section English Language Development Assessment (ELDA).  The ESOL teacher will assess the student’s English language to determine the student’s level of English proficiency and to make appropriate instructional and program placement decisions.

28 New Students 1. The ESOL teacher will conduct the in-depth Home Language Survey (Appendix E) and the Enrollment Interview (Appendix F). 2. If ELDA scores are not available for the student or there may be a delay in receiving the scores, the ESOL teacher will administer a standardized language screener/assessment (LAS). The LAS assesses each student’s speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and abilities to determine placement and services.

29 Returning Students The ESOL teacher will review each student’s annual English proficiency test (ELDA) scores and report card and state assessment data at the beginning of each school year to determine placement and services for returning students. Note: ESOL teachers must assess students’ English language proficiency within 30 days of enrollment at the beginning of the year and within ten days after the beginning of the year. Note: Parents do not have a right to refuse a screener and/or ELDA. These tests are required for compliance with the basic requirements under federal Law. Once the student is assessed with ELDA they are assessed with ELDA until he/she meets exit criteria-guidance (01/2013)

30 Screening To screen from grades 2-12 (Online) : https://oas.ctb.com/TestSessionInfoWeb/login.jsp District is responsible. Assigns only one user per school.https://oas.ctb.com/TestSessionInfoWeb/login.jsp To test students from K-1(paper and pencil): School is responsible (Product code: C ) What is Pre Las? It is a State approved screener to access potential English language learners based on the home language surveys. When do we use Pre Las? Based on identification of a potential ELL through the Home Language Survey, new ELLs must be tested within thirty days of enrollment at the beginning of the school year, and within two weeks thereafter within the school year. The school will review school records to see if the child has ELDA scores from his/her previous schools. If these scores cannot be obtained, a language assessment will be conducted within 10 school days to determine language dominance and proficiency.

31 Program Placement One way to help ensure that students are placed properly is to convene a student support team or ELL Committee. The ELL Committee is a school committee responsible for guiding and monitoring the placement, services, and assessment of students who are ELLs. The ELL Committee may be comprised of content area or general classroom teachers of ELLs, assessment specialists, school administrators, guidance counselors, ESOL staff, and members-at-large (e.g., school leaders, parents, student support personnel, community representatives, speech language therapists, and school psychologists). A school may choose to use an existing school based student support committee as the ELL Committee.

32 Program Placement  K-1 students and students with ELDA scores of 3, 4, and 5 may not need to be served by ESOL teachers/paraprofessionals if they are performing well in their regular education classrooms. They should only be pulled out of mainstream classroom instruction if they are receiving more instruction in English than what they would receive in their mainstream classroom. On-going formative assessment in addition to summative assessment should be done in mainstream and ESOL classrooms to better tailor each student’s ESOL and regular education program to their individual educational needs.  It is important to remember that all ELLs do not need to be served in the same way, e.g. volunteers, paraprofessionals, etc. can provide additional support as appropriate for some ELLs.

33 Student Placement  Initial grade placement should be with same-age classmates. Classroom teachers should modify instruction and assignments to meet the academic and language needs of the LEP students. Grades should reflect these modifications. High School Placement for ELL’s  Age appropriate placement at the high school level is based on credits.  So while high school ELLs be placed at the high school level, their actual grade level should be based on the number of credits they have earned.

34 New PowerSchool Coding of Bilingual Students  Students in grades K-2 who score FEP on the LAS screener will be coded a “6” in PowerSchool. Those students will not take the ELDA but will be monitored for four years (6,7, 8 and remain 8). This applies only to students in K-2 who have NEVER taken ELDA.  Students in grades 3-12 who score FEP on the LAS screener may be coded an “8” in PowerSchool. Those students will not take the ELDA.  Students needing to re-enter the program, based on poor academic performance or a reading score on a state assessment that does not meet the standard, are required to receive ELL services. Any students who have re-entered will not be classified as an “8” until they have again met state requirements for English Language Proficiency in accordance with the S.C. Accountability Workbook.

35 Support Services for ELL The school should Address Four Guiding Questions:  What is the instructional program/service provided to ALL students?  What does the LEA do to meet the Law requirements?  What services are the LEA required by other Federal, State, and local laws or regulations to provide?  Was the program /service previously provided with Federal, State, and local funds?

36 Title III Requirements: Parent Notification and Involvement Notification of identification for and placement in language instruction educational programs. AND Notification of LEA failure to meet Title III annual measurable achievement objectives (AMAO’s) if applicable  When a student is identified for the ESOL program, parents/Guardians are notified of the ESOL program services to be received by the student within 30 days after the beginning of the school year. This notification will include the following:  the reasons for the identification of the student as limited-English proficient and the need for placement in an English language instruction educational program  the student’s level of English proficiency; how such level was assessed; and the status of the student’s academic achievement  the method of program instruction  how the program will meet the educational strengths and needs of the student  how the program will specifically help the student learn English and meet age-appropriate academic achievement standards for grade promotion and graduation  the specific exit requirements for the programs; the expected date of transition from the program into regular classrooms; and the expected date of graduation from high school, if appropriate  if applicable, how the program meets objectives of the student’s individualized education plan (IEP)

37 Student Waivers  If a parent/guardian does not want to take advantage of services provided by the ESOL program, the parent/guardian must sign a form in order to document that the ESOL program services were offered and refused. This waiver means that students do not have to be pulled for services. However, the child should still have an ELL plan, his/her progress should be monitored, and additional help must be offered if the child is not making adequate progress. This form will be kept in the student’s permanent record. If a parent chooses to withdraw his or her child from the ESOL program, additional documentation must be signed and kept in the student’s permanent file.  Need to be waived every year  Have a parent conference with parents if student is struggling and look at changing from waived status.

38 Accommodations for ELL Students in Regular Education  The ESOL teacher and the regular classroom teacher along with other members of the ELL committee collaborate to determine appropriate instructional objectives and needed accommodations for ELLs in the classroom. A variety of classroom modifications are permitted for ELLs. Accommodations, such as the following, may be included for students and are noted on the district’s Student Accommodations Plan for ELL Students.  modification of regular classroom assignments and tests (e.g., allowing extra time for completing assignments or tests; allowing use of textbook during tests; modifying amount of information for which student is held accountable)  adaptation of lessons to the levels of the students;  use of graphs, charts, and/or other visuals;

39 Programs for Exceptional Students  When an ELL is referred to special education, attempts will be made to conduct the assessment in the student’s native language or through a translator. If for some reason this is not possible, or not advisable, a nonverbal instrument will be administered. Information gleaned from a parent interview regarding the student’s development will also be considered. Every effort will be made to ensure that no child is placed in special education because of language difficulties, rather than due to disability. Also, the evaluator will make sure that the child is having the disability in the child’s native language.  Students who qualify for special education services will also continue to receive ESOL services. They will be monitored for language acquisition. Their language needs will be addressed in IEP.

40 ESOL Testing  Please do not have a right to refuse a screener and/or ELDA  These tests are required for compliance with the basic requirements under federal law  Once the student is assessed with ELDA they are assessed with ELDA until he/she meets the exit criteria-guidance directly from Washington 01/13.  We do not have to notify the parent about testing. However, it is best practice.

41 Exiting Students from ESOL Support Services  In addition, when students exit from the English language instruction educational program, the school system must monitor the progress of those students for a period of at least two years to determine their success in the regular school program. Students who experience difficulty in content classes during the monitoring period due to lack of prior knowledge or lack of information in the knowledge scaffold should be provided with academic support through methods that may include temporary reentry into an English language instruction educational program.  A student is ready to exit from the ESOL program when s/he scores fluent English-proficient (ELDA FEP-5) on English Language Development Assessment (ELDA) in grades  In addition, when students exit from the English language instruction educational program, the school system must monitor the progress of those students for a period of at least two years to determine their success in the regular school program. Students who experience difficulty in content classes during the monitoring period due to lack of prior knowledge or lack of information in the knowledge scaffold should be provided with academic support through methods that may include temporary reentry into an English language instruction educational program.  A student is ready to exit from the ESOL program when s/he scores fluent English-proficient (ELDA FEP-5) on English Language Development Assessment (ELDA) in grades 3-12.

42 Monitoring Success of Former ELL Students  It is important for regular classroom teachers to note the progress of each exited student. The full process of follow-up and post-exit monitoring is a school responsibility.  After a student is exited from the English language instruction education program, a follow-up review should be made and documented within the first two weeks. The purpose of the review is to verify that the student can function academically and socially in the new setting. Periodic monitoring should continue for two years. At the end of each progress-reporting period, a designated staff person should contact teachers in the student’s regular classes to:  Determine if the student is adjusting and succeeding academically  Verify that the student is sustaining the criteria used to exit from the English language instruction educational program  Identify any academic or other needs

43 Monitoring Success of Former ELL Students Progress monitoring may include:  Review of grades  Review of formal and informal student assessment results  Review of student work samples  Interviews with the student  Interviews with the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s)  Students who re-enter the program Students who re-enter the program based on poor academic performance or a reading score on a state assessment that does not meet the standard are required to receive ESOL services. Any students who have re-entered will not be classified as “Exited” until they have again met state requirements for English language proficiency in accordance with the SCAW.  Progress monitoring may include:  Review of grades  Review of formal and informal student assessment results  Review of student work samples  Interviews with the student  Interviews with the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s)  Students who re-enter the program  Students who re-enter the program based on poor academic performance or a reading score on a state assessment that does not meet the standard are required to receive ESOL services. Any students who have re-entered will not be classified as “Exited” until they have again met state requirements for English language proficiency in accordance with the SCAW.

44 ESOL Standards  The central objective of these standards is that our ELLs become proficient in English in all four language domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It is important for both ESOL and mainstream educators who teach ELLs to remember that these are not stand-alone standards but are linked to the state’s English language arts and mathematics academic standards and are designed to be used in conjunction with the regular grade-appropriate content standards.  The school needs to ensure the English language development (ELD) standards are implemented by both general education and ESL teachers in all classrooms with English Language learners (ELLs) grades K-12.

45 Annual Program Evaluation  Title III Monitoring NCLB law requires that all LEAs receiving Title III funds, including members of the Title III Consortium, be monitored for compliance with Title III regulations. LEAs are required to annually complete the Title III Self-Assessment Report and to report their status in regard to each of five elements. The elements are: 1. Instructional Programs 2. Professional Development 3. Parental Notification and Outreach 4. Fiduciary Responsibility 5. Records and Maintenance

46 New State Guidance  K-2 students enrolled THIS year who score a “5” or “FEP” on the initial placement test will not take ELDA. Code these students a “6” and monitor them for four years.  This applies only to students in K-2 who have NEVER taken ELDA  These students must be closely monitored for 4 years (“6,7, 8 and remain 8”)

47 New State Guidance: ESOL Testing  Parents do not have a right to refuse a screener and/or ELDA  These tests are required for compliance with the basic requirements under federal law  Once the student is assessed with ELDA they are assessed with ELDA until he/she meets the exit criteria – guidance directly from Washington 01/13

48 New State Guidance: Waived ELL’s  Waiver must be completed yearly  Must still take ELDA  Monitor the student’s progress and accommodate if needed  Have a parent conference if the student is struggling and look at changing from waived status

49 Resources   Contact your school Title III Coordinator  Contact District Title III Coordinator Vamshi Rudrapati (Mr. V) Phone: (803)


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