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Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Section 5.1 Polynomial Functions.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Section 5.1 Polynomial Functions."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Section 5.1 Polynomial Functions

2 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Objectives Monomials and Polynomials Addition and Subtraction of Polynomials Polynomial Functions Evaluating Polynomials Operations on Functions Applications and Models

3 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Monomials and Polynomials A term is a number, a variable, or a product of numbers and variables raised to powers. Examples of terms: If the variables in a term have only nonnegative integer exponents, the term is called a monomial. Examples of monomials:

4 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example Determine whether the expression is a monomial. a.b.c.d. Solution a.b. c.d. monomial not a monomial negative exponent not a monomial sum (+) of two monomials not a monomial negative exponent y -1 since 3/y = 3y -1 Division by a variable

5 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Monomials The degree of a monomial equals the sum of the exponents of the variables. A constant term has degree 0, unless the term is 0 (which as an undefined degree). The numeric constant in a monomial is called its coefficient. The table shows the degree and coefficient of several monomials.

6 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Polynomials A polynomial is either a monomial or a sum of monomials. Polynomials containing one variable are called polynomials of one variable. The leading coefficient of a polynomial of one variable is the coefficient of the monomial with highest degree. The degree of a polynomial equals the degree of the monomial with the highest degree.

7 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Addition and Subtraction We can add like terms. If two terms contain the same variables raised to the same power, we call them like terms.

8 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example Simplify each expression by combining like terms. a.b. Solution a. b.

9 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example Simplify the expression. Solution

10 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example Find the sum. Solution Polynomials can be added vertically by placing like terms in the same columns and then adding each column.

11 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Subtracting Polynomials To subtract two polynomials we add the first polynomial to the opposite of the second polynomial. To find the opposite of a polynomial, we negate each term.

12 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example Simplify. Solution The opposite of

13 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc.

14 Polynomial Functions The following expressions are examples of polynomials of one variable. As a result, we say that the following are symbolic representations of polynomial functions of one variable.

15 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example Determine whether f(x) represents a polynomial function. If possible, identify the type of polynomial function and its degree. a. b. c. cubic polynomial, of degree 3 not a polynomial function because the variable is negative not a polynomial

16 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example A graph of is shown. Evaluate f( 1) graphically and check your result symbolically. To calculate f(–1) graphically find –1 on the x-axis and move down until the graph of f is reached. Then move horizontally to the y-axis. f( 1) = –4

17 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example Evaluate f(x) at the given value of x. Solution

18 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc.

19 Example Let f(x) = 3x and g(x) = 6 – x 2. Find each sum or difference. Solution a. b.

20 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example Let model an athletes heart rate (or pulse) in beats per minute (bpm) t minutes after strenuous exercise has stopped, where 0 t 8. a. What is the initial heart rate when the athlete stops exercising? When the athlete stops exercising, the heart rate is 200 beats per minute.

21 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example (cont) Let model an athletes heart rate (or pulse) in beats per minute (bpm) t minutes after strenuous exercise has stopped, where 0 t 8. b. What is the heart rate after 8 minutes?

22 Copyright © 2013, 2009, 2005 Pearson Education, Inc. Example (cont) Let model an athletes heart rate (or pulse) in beats per minute (bpm) t minutes after strenuous exercise has stopped, where 0 t 8. c. A graph of P is shown. Interpret this graph. The heart rate does not drop at a constant rate; rather, it drops rapidly at first and then gradually begins to level off.


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