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Minnesota First Detectors Minnesota Forest Pest First Detector Program.

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Presentation on theme: "Minnesota First Detectors Minnesota Forest Pest First Detector Program."— Presentation transcript:

1 Minnesota First Detectors Minnesota Forest Pest First Detector Program

2 Minnesota First Detectors Bronze birch borer

3 Minnesota First Detectors Bronze birch borer

4 Minnesota First Detectors Role of the First Detector Pest Reporter Do I Have? Checklist First Detector Minnesota Department of Agriculture Evaluate Using Guidelines First Detector Hotline

5 Minnesota First Detectors Responsibilities of the First Detector Follow the Guidelines for all reports. Triage pest reports and pass to MDA if pest cant be ruled out. Collect samples or pictures if convenient, else pass on information for MDA to collect sample.

6 Minnesota First Detectors Report Logs Record each report – regardless of resolution Primarily for work done as a First Detector MDA will collect Report Logs in December

7 Minnesota First Detectors Handling Samples Collecting Samples Collect it yourself if convenient, else Have reporter send to MDA if possible, or Let MDA know to collect if needed Types Wood or bark Insects Digital pictures Handling Treat as if infested with pest – keep contained Protect from damage, elements

8 Minnesota First Detectors Handling Samples Wood or bark Handle like it contains pest Secure so an emerging adult could not escape Double bag w/ heavy plastic bags at minimum Keep it cool until passed on to MDA Insects Secure in a sealable container that is crush-proof Store in a cool place (freezer) until passed on to MDA Digital pictures Use whenever possible to expedite process Send to as attachment

9 Minnesota First Detectors Common Reporting Situations Insect-based Saw it, but didnt capture it Have a specimen Tree-based Sample within reach? Tree to be felled in future? Re-contact if situation changes Consider phenology and host specificity when evaluating reports

10 Minnesota First Detectors Pest Phenology JFMAMJJASOND Sirex Immature (under bark or in wood) Adult ALB Immature (under bark or in wood) Adult EABImmature (under bark) Adult GMEgg mass Larva Pupa Adult

11 Minnesota First Detectors Host Specificity TypeGenusName 1 Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) 2 Emerald ash borer (EAB) Gypsy moth (GM) 3 Sirex woodwas p 4 ConiferAbiesFirNo Unlikely HardwoodAcer Maple, boxelder Very good host NoPossibleNo HardwoodAesculus Horse Chestnut Very good host NoPossibleNo HardwoodAlnusAlder No data No Preferred host No Hardwood Amelanc hier Servicebe rry No data No Preferred host No Partial list…

12 Minnesota First Detectors Working with the Public If possible, have the citizen review the appropriate checklist First Detectors do not have authority to enter private property without permission Being a First Detector is a volunteer activity

13 Minnesota First Detectors Site Visits Contact the owner before making a site visit. The homeowner should be present for visit. Get permission to look at the tree and/or pick up the insect. Explain the First Detector Program. Explain what your responsibilities are. Be polite, courteous and respect property. Report back to the homeowner the results of your findings if a decision is not made on site.

14 Minnesota First Detectors Minnesotas First Detection May 13 Arborist notices woodpecker damage on ash, eventually finds larvae May 13 PM – phone call to MDA regarding find May 14 AM – MDA visits sites and collects samples May 14 PM – USDA confirms find based on digital photos May 14 PM – Find announced at a press conference in St Paul Infestation is one of the youngest found – estimated 3 years old from dendrochronological analysis

15 Minnesota First Detectors 2009 EAB Reports Bronze birch borer Arrest the Pest (MDA) = 1814 calls between May 13 – December 31, calls during all of 2008 First Detector Hotline = 1025 calls during 2009 First Detector Referrals = 228 during 2009

16 Minnesota First Detectors 2009 First Detector Experiences Bronze birch borer First Detector Report Logs 50 cases logged and turned in to MDA 2 were insect-based 48 were tree-based 4 were not ash (~8%) EAB ruled out by First Detector in 40 (80%) First Detector not sure on 10 (20%) MDA consulted on 5 (10%)

17 Minnesota First Detectors Bronze birch borer

18 Minnesota First Detectors 2009 First Detector Survey How many people reported suspect EAB infestations to you? Total of 57 reports from 100 responses Total of 300 reports from 112 responses - 79% increase Bronze birch borer

19 Minnesota First Detectors 2009 First Detector Survey Bronze birch borer How many site visits did you make? Total of 107 from 100 responses 2009 – Total of 309 from 112 responses – 39% increase

20 Minnesota First Detectors 2009 First Detector Survey How many people asked you general EAB questions (not suspect reports)? 2008 – Total of 1023 questions from 100 responses 2009 – Total of 2696 questions from 112 responses – 43% increase Bronze birch borer

21 Minnesota First Detectors 2009 First Detector Survey Bronze birch borer Gypsy Moth 0 suspect reports 38 site visits 56 questions Asian longhorned beetle 0 suspect reports 0 site visits 6 questions Sirex woodwasp 0 suspect reports 0 site visits 2 questions

22 Minnesota First Detectors 2009 First Detector Survey How many total hours including training + travel volunteered during 2009? 1281 hours from 112 responses – average = 11.4 / person Bronze birch borer

23 Minnesota First Detectors 2009 First Detector Survey How many miles did you travel as a first detector? 7650 miles from 112 responses – average = 69.5 / person Bronze birch borer

24 Minnesota First Detectors 2010 EAB Field Days Thursdays, March 11 – April 15, formal sessions per day, AM and PM Held at St Paul Forestry Register today or via

25 Minnesota First Detectors Confidentiality Form

26 Minnesota First Detectors New and Emerging Invasive Forest Pests Plant & Disease Image Library, Bugwood.org Curtis Utley, CSUE, Bugwood.org

27 Minnesota First Detectors Meaning of Invasive Species non-native to an environment may be called: Alien, Exotic or Introduced If they also cause harm to the economy, environment and / or human health they are called: Invasive Native species are not called invasive even if they do cause harm Polydrusus spp. Steve Katovich USDA Forest Serivce Jeff Hahn, University of Minnesota Emerald ash borer Bronze birch borer Steve Katovich USDA Forest Serivce

28 Minnesota First Detectors Meaning of New and Emerging New = not present Asian longhorned beetle Emerging = present but not established Gypsy moth Established = widely present Dutch elm disease

29 Minnesota First Detectors The Pests Emerald ash borer Gypsy moth Asian longhorned beetle Thousand cankers on walnut John H. Ghent, USDA Forest Service Curtis Utley, CSUE, Bugwood.org


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