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Improving Achievement The CPC Way © 2004. James M. Furukawa, J.D., Ph.D.

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Presentation on theme: "Improving Achievement The CPC Way © 2004. James M. Furukawa, J.D., Ph.D."— Presentation transcript:

1 Improving Achievement The CPC Way © James M. Furukawa, J.D., Ph.D.

2 2 of 37 Introduction Lesson 7: Reading

3 3 of 37 There are two main sources of information: reading and listening or textbook and lecture, respectively. Therefore, we must not only be good readers, but we must also be good listeners and note-takers. In this lesson you will learn how to get meaning from what you read and to do it accurately and efficiently. Lesson Goals In this lesson you will: Lesson 7: Reading Click here to continue. Apply the CPC Way to improve your reading skills. skills.

4 4 of 37 To help you become a skilled reader, this lesson begins with: The CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading Click here to continue. (1) A review of the CPC Way rules (2) Subject and predicate (3) Application of the CPC Way in reading and (4) Parts of a book

5 5 of 37 C = Capacity to process information at one time. P = Pyramid of knowledge or an outline of keywords. C = Chunk everything under a heading by using VAST processes and asking FSAT questions. The CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

6 6 of 37 Subject—Noun. It can be several words: The large, green truck was carrying a heavy load. The underlined words are the subject; however, they can be reduced to truck (simple subject), which is a noun and a keyword. Sometimes, however, an adjective-noun pair may be the keyword. Some sentences may not be important and have no keywords worth underlining. Subject and Predicate Lesson 7: Reading

7 7 of 37 Predicate. The rest of the sentence is a predicate. In the sentence “The large, green truck was carrying a heaving load,” the predicate can be reduced to the verb, carrying. Subject and Predicate Lesson 7: Reading

8 8 of 37 Key words aid in understanding and remembering. Therefore, to improve reading comprehension, follow these three steps that are explained in later slides: Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading Click here to continue. A. Meaning and underline. B. Headings and outline. C. Review and chunk. Memorize these headings.

9 9 of 37 A.Meaning and underline 1. Meaning a. Pause shortly after punctuations, such as commas and periods; also pause after subjects and predicates as divided by the / mark in the reading assignment to be found in Appendix 7, which you will be asked to print later. b. Meaning of what you read should be understood as you pause. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

10 10 of 37 B. Heading and outline 1.A heading is to be assigned to each paragraph—normally the keyword of the first sentence (shown in bold letters in the reading assignment to come). 2. Outline the key words beginning with the chapter or text heading. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

11 11 of 37 B. Heading and outline Go ahead and print Appendix 7. Civics: Citizens in Action by clicking the button below. Do two things: (1) Read for meaning and underline (2) assign headings and outline. Your outline should look like the one shown in the next slide. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

12 12 of 37 I. What is civics? A. class 1. Class 2. American government 3. Study 4. Government leaders 5. You B. “civics” 1. Citizen 2. Certain laws a. govern b. government C. nation 1. Nation 2. Citizens 3. citizen Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

13 13 of 37 What if your outline does not look exactly like the one shown. That is to be expected because each one of us differ in our learning experiences. Therefore, some of us my need to underline more words, others less; some of us may underline certain words, others may not. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

14 14 of 37 The main point is: Limit the number underlined to keywords—nouns and/or adjective nouns that are subjects of sentences and paragraphs. The more words you underline, the harder it becomes to remember as you will see in the next slide. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

15 15 of Review by asking questions about the words in the outline. If you are not sure what a word(s) means, you can read about it again or even add it to your outline. You can also check its definition. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

16 16 of Chunk keywords so the recall of a heading will lead to everything below it. EXAMPLE: The recall of “What is Civics?” should lead to the three paragraph heading (class, civics, and nation) and then everything below them. Use VAST processes during learning and ask FSAT questions when reviewing. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

17 17 of 37 A. Capacity 1. Read silently. If you read aloud or try to say each word silently, you will using up some of your precious capacity. You should be using it, instead, to understand what you are reading in meaningful word groups. Also, reading aloud makes you a slow reader. Move your eyes quickly and smoothly across a sentence without trying to pronounce the words, opening your mouth, or rereading. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

18 18 of 37 A. Capacity 1. Read silently. 2. Few paragraphs. Read only a few paragraphs, perhaps only one if it is a difficult paragraph. Do not overload your capacity. If you read too much, you won’t remember what you read. Read a little and then think about what you have read. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

19 19 of 37 A. Capacity 1. Read silently. 2. Few paragraphs. 3. Review. Review information from the outline in quantities that match your capacity. However, do not break up units under a heading. For example, if your capacity is 4, under “Class” in the Civics outline, do not skip; “5. Citizen.” Keep related words together. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

20 20 of 37 B. Pyramid 1. Key words. Locate keywords. They are usually the subjects of a sentence or paragraph and are normally nouns or adjective-noun pairs. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

21 21 of 37 B. Pyramid 1. Key words. 2. Definitions. Learn the definitions of words. If you don’t know what a word means, look it up in a dictionary and copy the definition. Writing it down will help you remember it. Don’t forget to follow the suggestions given in Lesson 6 on learning definitions. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

22 22 of 37 B. Pyramid 1. Key words. 2. Definitions. 3. Outline. Prepare an outline. Copy the key words in an outline format for later study. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

23 23 of 37 C. Chunking 1. Questions. Ask questions about the keywords in the outline. What do they mean? How are they related? How do they tell a story? Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

24 24 of 37 C. Chunking 1. Questions. 2. Chunk. Chunk everything together into a single, meaningful whole to make recall accurate. Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

25 25 of 37 How well have you learned the application of the CPC Way? Complete the following outline. I. CPC RULES A, Capacity B. Pyramid C. Chunking Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading

26 26 of 37 Application of the CPC Way Lesson 7: Reading Click here to check your answers. I. CPC RULES A. Capacity 1. Read silently 2. Few paragraphs 3. Review B. Pyramid 1. Keywords 2. Definitions 3. Outline C. Chunking 1. Questions 2. Chunk

27 27 of 37 Here are six important parts of a book: Parts of a Book Lesson 7: Reading Parts of a book Click here to continue. 1) Title 2) Introduction 3) Section headings 4) Subjects 5) Italics and 6) Graphics

28 28 of 37 A. Title. The title of a book, story, or chapter gives you an idea of what it is about. EXAMPLE: The title of this lesson is “Parts of a book.” The title is like a road sign which tells you where your are headed. Parts of a Book Lesson 7: Reading Title

29 29 of 37 B. Introduction and summary. These parts are also provided to make the text easier to read and remember. They give the key ideas. Parts of a Book Lesson 7: Reading Intro- duction

30 30 of 37 C. Section headings. Text is often divided into sections and a section heading tells you what the part is about. Like the title, the section heading tells you what to expect. Parts of a Book Lesson 7: Reading Section headings

31 31 of 37 D. Subjects. Subjects of sentences and paragraphs also tell you what is important. The subject is usually a noun or adjective-noun found in the first or lead sentence of a paragraph. Sometimes, however, it may be found elsewhere, such as in the last sentence. Parts of a Book Lesson 7: Reading Subjects

32 32 of 37 E. Italics and bold print. Italics and bold print are used to highlight keywords. When you see them, you know that they are important. Parts of a Book Lesson 7: Reading Italics and bold print

33 33 of 37 F. Graphics (figures, graphs, tables, and pictures). Illustrations help to make the text easier to understand (V in VAST). You saw figures and tables in some of the earlier lessons. Parts of a Book Lesson 7: Reading Graphics

34 34 of 37 What do these parts of a book tell you? 1. Title 2. Introductions and summaries 3. Section headings 4. Subjects 5. Italics and bold print 6. Figures, graphs, pictures, and tables. Answer your questions on a sheet of paper. Reading: QUESTIONS 7-1 ? ? ? Lesson 7: Reading

35 35 of 37 Reading : ANSWERS 7-1 Lesson 7: Reading 1. The title gives you an idea of what you are reading is about. 2. These parts give the key ideas. 3. The section heading tells you what to expect with the part you are about to read. 4. Subjects of sentences and paragraphs tell you what is important. 5. Italics and bold print highlight keywords. 6. Graphics make the text easier to understand. Now apply what you have learned. Use the CPC Way to read Lesson 7 again.

36 36 of 37 Reading and listening are two important sources of information. You have completed the first part. If you are a good reader, you can learn anything that you want, for there are books on every subject that you can think of. Bingo! Lesson 7: Reading

37 37 of 37 In this lesson we learned how to apply the CPC Way in reading. We read a few paragraphs at a time silently (capacity). We identify keywords, look up definitions, and prepare an outline (pyramid). Finally, we ask questions about the information we just learned, and group it into a meaningful whole (chunk). We also learned the six important parts of a book. Next In the next lesson we will see how we can use the CPC Way in listening. Click the Next button to get started with Lesson Eight. Summary Lesson 7: Reading


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