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How To Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core Robin Fogarty & Associates robinfogarty.com Brian Pete Sheepshead HS, Brooklyn NY.

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Presentation on theme: "How To Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core Robin Fogarty & Associates robinfogarty.com Brian Pete Sheepshead HS, Brooklyn NY."— Presentation transcript:

1 How To Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core Robin Fogarty & Associates robinfogarty.com Brian Pete Sheepshead HS, Brooklyn NY

2 How to Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core 7 Key Student Proficiencies of the New National Standards

3 School Leaders Guide To the Common Core Achieving Results Through Rigor and Relevance

4 College and Career Ready !

5 21 st Century Self-Reliance “We must teach our children so that they can learn without being taught.” Singapore Director MOE 2009

6 To Think Like a... Scientist/Detective Publisher/Writer Mathematician/Doctor Engineer/Mechanic Composer/ Musician Researcher/Blogger

7 Shift from “What’s Taught” to “What Students Need to Be Able to Do” 7 To succeed in 21 st Century college and careers, students need to be able to: 1. Solve problems 2. Manage oneself 3. Adapt to change 4. Analyze/conceptualize 5. Reflect on /improve performance 6. Communicate 7. Work in teams 8. Create / innovate / critique 9. Engage in learning throughout life

8 8 1. Solve problems: Seek and Ye Shall Find 2. Manage oneself: Respect Responsibility Reliability 3. Adapt to change:Open Minds Open Doors 4. Analyze/conceptualize: Think beyond the Google 5. Reflect on /improve performance: Look Backwards to Go Forward 6. Communicate: Talking is Learning 7. Work in teams: Unity Builds Community 8. Create / innovate / critique: Make it! Make it Again! Make it Better! 9. Engage in learning throughout life: Learning is Living

9 9 Describe: Provid a Specific Workplace Example 1 ☐ Solve problems 2 ☐ Manage oneself 3 ☐ Adapt to change 4 ☐ Analyze/conceptualize 5 ☐ Reflect on /improve performance 6 ☐ Communicate 7 ☐ Work in teams 8 ☐ Create / innovate / critique 9 ☐ Engage in learning throughout life

10 Highlight: Related to content, what happened, specifics, details, facts. Insight: Reflection on the process, what I thought about what happened, meta-cognitive, personal.

11 Meet and Greet Share a Highlight and an Insight

12 That’s a good idea because...

13 What is the criteria for an effective Professional Development Session?

14 Three Musketeers Education Today and Tomorrow Or other media Education Today & Tomorrow video

15 The Three Musketeers

16 The Three Musketeers

17 Partner A Generalize about the schools of Today!

18 Take it all in with the first reading. Hone in on the key ideas of the piece. Extrapolate one big (prevailing) idea. Make a motto or slogan about big idea. Express the theme statement. Generalize Chapter VII Cognitive Transfer and Application

19 Partner B Clarify about schools of Tomorrow!

20 Seek the meaning of words and phrases. Express these in your own words. Expose the essence of the idea. Clarify Chapter III Complex Thinking Mindful Dispositions

21 Partner C Determine film’s message to CCSS!

22 Note key points. Observe options. Think it through & ID possibilities. Express personal choice. Determine Chapter III Complex Thinking Mindful Dispositions

23 Critical Thinking – Analysis Evaluation Problem Solving Creative Thinking – Generate Associate Hypothesize Complex Thinking – Clarify Interpret Determine Comprehensive Thinking – Understand Infer Compare/ Collaborative Thinking – Explain Develop Decide Communicative Thinking – Reason Connect Represent Cognitive Transfer – Synthesize Generalize Apply Seven Student Proficiencies 21 Thinking Skills in CCSS)

24 When I was out saying the world is flat, Facebook wasn't in it, Twitter was still a sound, The cloud was still in the sky, 4G was a parking place, LinkedIn was a prison, and, for most people, Skype was a typo," he said. "That all happened in [seven] years." The World is Flat 2005 Thomas Friedman

25 GOALS College Career Ready

26 Students Who Are College and Career Ready in Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, and Language They demonstrate independence. Students can, without significant scaffolding, comprehend and evaluate complex texts across a range of types and disciplines, and they can construct effective arguments and convey intricate or multifaceted information. Likewise, students are able independently to discern a speaker’s key points, request clarification, and ask relevant questions. They build on others’ ideas, articulate their own ideas, and confirm they have been understood. Without prompting, they demonstrate command of standard English and acquire and use a wide-ranging vocabulary. More broadly, they become self-directed learners, effectively seeking out and using resources to assist them, including teachers, peers, and print and digital reference materials.

27 Shift from “What’s Taught” to “What Students Need to Be Able to Do” 27 To succeed in 21 st Century college and careers, students need to be able to: 1. Solve problems 2. Manage oneself 3. Adapt to change 4. Analyze/conceptualize 5. Reflect on /improve performance 6. Communicate 7. Work in teams 8. Create / innovate / critique 9. Engage in learning throughout life

28 Relevant Content with Rigorous Thinking Common Core Balances

29 Three- Phase Model

30 Explicit Teaching

31

32 Adult Learners Thinking SKills Determine Teach Process as Content Thinking Learned is Thinking Applied Can everything be determined?

33 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process

34 Talk Through

35 A detour... A temporary inconvenience for permanent improvement

36 The Things You’d Save... A wildfire is coming fast. Your family and pets are safe. What three things would you save? Target Thinking Skill Template: Motivational Mindset

37 The Things You’d Save... A wildfire is coming fast. Your family and pets are safe. What three things would you save? ? ? ?

38 The Things You’d Save... Look over all the choices and determine a central theme. ? ? ?

39 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process The Things You’d Save

40 To double-dip with your chip To not invite a friend to an event To borrow something without permission To tell a white lie or omit the truth To refuse an invitation, or to go and not participate Determine: Is it right or wrong?

41 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process The Things You’d Save Is it right or wrong?

42 NOTENOTE Note key points. Observe options Think it through & identify possibilities Express Personal Choice Target Thinking Skill Template: Menu of Operations

43 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process The Things You’d Save N - O - T - E - Note key points. Observe options Think it through & identify possibilities Express Personal Choice Is it right or wrong?

44 After watching this video clip... Determine 3 possible themes Target Thinking Skill Template: Instructional Strategy

45 Mr. Holland’s Opus video

46 Determine which is the central theme... Target Thinking Skill Template: Instructional Strategy

47 Speaking and Listening Standards K– Determin e the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Comprehension and Collaboration Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Reading Standards for Literature Key Ideas and Details

48 7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. 7.2 Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. Comprehension and Collaboration Speaking and Listening Standards 6–12 Reading Standards for Informational Text 6–12

49 K - With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. 1 – Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. 2 - Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. 3 - Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text 4 - Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 5 - Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. 6 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. 7 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. 8 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Reading Standards for Literature K-12Key Ideas and Details 2

50 K - With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. 1 – Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. 2 - Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. 3 - Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text 4 - Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 5 - Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. 6 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. 7 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. 8 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Reading Standards for Literature K-12Key Ideas and Details 2

51 K - With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. 1 – Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. 2 - Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. 3 - Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text 4 - Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 5 - Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. 6 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. 7 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. 8 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Reading Standards for Literature K-12Key Ideas and Details 2

52 Target Thinking Skill Template: Menu of Operations Assignment: Determine a theme or central idea of the video; provide an objective summary of the video. 1 – 2 paragraphs

53 A summary is a succinct, accurate description, in your own words, of the content of a source text for quick overview, for inclusion in new writing, or as a study aid. SUMARY DEFINED:

54 Anatomy of an Objective Summary An effective summary concisely describes, in your own words and without editorializing, the thesis and major points in a source text or media. It differs from an outline insofar as it is composed of full sentences. An effective summary meets the following four requirements: It is brief. Rule of thumb: no longer than 250 words. It is complete. It includes the thesis (topic plus controlling idea) of the source text. It is accurate. It is faithful to the facts, emphasis, and spirit of the source. It is objective. It strives to report what the original writer intended, without embellishment.

55 Was the Summary... It is brief. It is complete. It includes the thesis of the source It is accurate. (Faithful to the facts, emphasis, and spirit of the source.) It is objective. (It strives to report what the original writer intended, without embellishment.) Target Thinking Skill Template: Assessment:

56 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process The Things You’d Save N - O - T - E - Note key points. Observe options Think it through & identify possibilities Express Personal Choice 3 Possible Themes Mr. Holland - Video Is it right or wrong?

57 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process The Things You’d Save N - O - T - E - Note key points. Observe options Think it through & identify possibilities Express Personal Choice 3 Possible Themes Mr. Holland - Video Check summary on 4 points Is it right or wrong?

58 For my students, Determining the Main Idea or Central Theme will be a challenge. Agree or Disagree. Explain. Target Thinking Skill Template: Reflection:

59 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process The Things You’d Save N - O - T - E - Note key points. Observe options Think it through & identify possibilities Express Personal Choice 3 Possible Themes Mr. Holland - Video Check summary on 4 points Determining is a challenge. Agree / Disagree Is it right or wrong?

60 SCIENCE Determine Cause/Effect Threaded Model SS Determine Motive History ELA Determine POV Novel/Poem MATH Determine Rate of Change Determine #6 Reflection

61 Three Phase Model

62 Walk Through Classroom Application Thinking Skill with Standards-based Content Lesson

63 AB Partners

64 Classroom Lesson: Motivational Mind Set: CONCRETE HOOK Closure: Assessment and Reflection Instruction Strategy: Apply N-O-T-E to content unit or lesson

65 Common Core State Standards The Elements of the...

66 Tiny Transfer Book

67 Make a Little Book Elements of CCSS Name Date

68 ) Standards

69 Exemplars

70 Performance Tasks

71 Back Cover of Little Book NOTES

72 Key Ideas and Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Craft and Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.* 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. ELA - ANCHOR STANDARDS

73 Anchor Standards

74 Reading Key Ideas and Details Craft and Structure Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Writing Text Types and Purposes* Production and Distribution of Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge Range of Writing Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Language Conventions of Standard English Knowledge of Language Vocabulary Acquisition and Use K-5

75 Anchor Standards Reading Key Ideas and Details Craft and Structure Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Writing Text Types and Purposes* Production and Distribution of Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge Range of Writing Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Language Conventions of Standard English Knowledge of Language Vocabulary Acquisition and Use 6-12 History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

76 Key Ideas and Details 7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. Craft & Structure 3.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent. Key Ideas and Details Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

77 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. The CCSS Difference - Grade 7 ELA Produce written work and oral work that demonstrate comprehension of informational materials. After: CCSS (2010) Before: (2004)

78 Math Practices 1. Make sense of problems & persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments; critique reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity on repeated reasoning

79 Geometry K. K.4. Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/“corners”) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length). Operations and Algebraic Thinking 5.3 Analyze patterns and relationships. Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify apparent relationships between corresponding terms. Form ordered pairs consisting of corresponding terms from the two patterns, and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane.

80 N - Note key points. O - Observe options T - Think it through & identify possibilities E - Express Personal Choice With your partner... Determine the Central Theme

81 Standards “What we want Students to Know and be able to Do.” ( SWBAT…Students will be able to…) Rigor means deeper not harder! RIGOR

82

83 Stand, Compare Exemplars New Partner Dynamic Duo

84 AB Partners

85 Exemplar Informational Texts (resources)

86

87

88 Exemplar Informational Common Core State Standards Appendix B page 31 “Garden Helpers.” National Geographic Young Explorers September (2009) Not all bugs and worms are pests. Some help your garden grow. Earthworms make soil rich and healthy. This helps plants grow strong! A ladybug eats small bugs. The bugs can’t eat the plants. This keeps your garden safe. A praying mantis eats any bug it can catch. Not many bugs can get past this quick hunter! This spider catches bugs in its sticky web. It keeps bugs away from your garden. Copyright © 2009 National Geographic. Used by permission.

89 Simon, Seymour. Volcanoes. New York: HarperCollins, (2006) In early times, no one knew how volcanoes formed or why they spouted red-hot molten rock. In modern times, scientists began to study volcanoes. They still don’t know all the answers, but they know much about how a volcano works. Our planet is made up of many layers of rock. The top layers of solid rock are called the crust. Deep beneath the crust is the mantle, where it is so hot that some rock melts. The melted, or molten, rock is called magma. Volcanoes are formed when magma pushes its way up through the crack in Earth’s crust. This is called a volcanic eruption. When magma pours forth on the surface, it is called lava. Text Copyright © 1998 by Seymour Simon. Used by permission of HarperCollins Publishers. Exemplar Informational Common Core State Standards Appendix B page 72

90 Exemplar Informational Petroski, Henry. “The Evolution of the Grocery Bag.” American Scholar 72.4 (Autumn 2003). (2003) That much-reviled bottleneck known as the American supermarket checkout lane would be an even greater exercise in frustration were it not for several technological advances. The Universal Product Code and the decoding laser scanner, introduced in 1974, tally a shopper’s groceries far more quickly and accurately than the old method of inputting each purchase manually into a cash register. But beeping a large order past the scanner would have led only to a faster pileup of cans and boxes down the line, where the bagger works, had it not been for the introduction, more than a century earlier, of an even greater technological masterpiece: the square-bottomed paper bag. (continued...) Common Core State Standards Appendix B page 98

91 Exemplar Informational Common Core State Standards Appendix B page 123 Washington, George. “Farewell Address.” (1796) Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican government. But that jealousy to be useful must be impartial; else it becomes the instrument of the very influence to be avoided, instead of a defense against it. Excessive partiality for one foreign nation and excessive dislike of another cause those whom they actuate to see danger only on one side, and serve to veil and even second the arts of influence on the other. Real patriots who may resist the intrigues of the favorite are liable to become suspected and odious, while its tools and dupes usurp the applause and confidence of the people, to surrender their interests. (continued...)

92 Exemplar Narrative Texts (resources)

93 Exemplar Narrative Common Core State Standards Appendix B page 23 Young, Ed. Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China. NY: Putnam, (1989) “Po Po,” Shang shouted, but there was no answer. “Po Po,” Tao shouted, but there was no answer. “Po Po,” Paotze shouted. There was still no answer. The children climbed to the branches just above the wolf and saw that he was truly dead. Then they climbed down, went into the house, closed the door, locked the door with the latch and fell peacefully asleep. On the next day their mother returned with baskets of food from their real Po Po, and the three sisters told her the story of the Po Po who had come. Copyright © 1989 Ed Young. Reprinted with permission of McIntosh & Otis, Inc.

94 Exemplar Narrative Common Core State Standards Appendix B page 123 Stevens, Janet. Tops and Bottoms. New York: Harcourt, (1995) Once upon a time there lived a very lazy bear who had lots of money and lots of land. His father had been a hard worker and a smart business bear, and he had given all of his wealth to his son. But all Bear wanted to do was sleep. Not far down the road lived a hare. Although Hare was clever, he sometimes got into trouble. He had once owned land, too, but now he had nothing. He had lost a risky bet with a tortoise and had sold off all of his land to Bear to pay off the debt. Hare and his family were in very bad shape. “The children are so hungry Father Hare! We must think of something!” Mrs. Hare cried one day. So Hare and Mrs. Hare put their heads together and cooked up a plan. […] Bear stared at his pile. “But, Hare, all the best parts are in your half!” “You chose the tops, Bear,” Hare said. “Now, Hare, you’ve tricked me. You plant this field again—and this season I want the bottoms!” Hare agreed. “It’s a done deal, Bear.”

95 Exemplar Narrative Kafka, Franz. The Metamorphosis. Translated by Stanley Corngold. New York: Bantam, (1915) When Gregor Samsa woke up one morning from unsettling dreams, he found himself changed in his bed into a monstrous vermin. He was lying on his back as hard as armor plate, and when he lifted his head a little, he saw his vaulted brown belly, sectioned by arch-shaped ribs, to whose dome the cover, about to slide off completely, could barely cling. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, were waving helplessly before his eyes. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It was no dream. His room, a regular human room, only a little on the small side, lay quiet between the four familiar walls. Over the table, on which an unpacked line of fabric samples was all spread out--Samsa was a traveling salesman--hung the picture which he had recently cut out of a glossy magazine and lodged in a pretty gilt frame. It showed a lady done up in a fur hat and a fur boa, sitting upright and raising up against the viewer a heavy fur muff in which her whole forearm had disappeared. Common Core State Standards Appendix B page 105

96 N - Note key points. O - Observe options T - Think it through & identify possibilities E - Express Personal Choice With your partner... Determine the Big Idea?

97 Exemplars Recommended Resources Narrative & Informational Complex Text Close Reading Deep Analysis RICHNESS

98 Dialogue Partner

99 Common Core State Standards Shoulder Partner

100 Students determine the meanings of words and phrases encountered in Sarah L. Thomson’s Where Do Polar Bears Live?, such as cub, den,, and the Arctic. [RI.2.4] (Appendix B, page 61) Students determine the meaning of the metaphor of a cat in Carl Sandburg’s poem “Fog” and contrast that figurative language to the meaning of the simile in William Blake’s “The Echoing Green.” [RL.5.4] (Appendix B, page 71)

101 Students determine the point of view of John Adams in his “Letter on Thomas Jefferson” and analyze how he distinguishes his position from an alternative approach articulated by Thomas Jefferson. [RI.7.6] (Appendix B, page 93) Students determine the meaning of domain-specific words or phrases, such as crust, mantle, magma, and lava, and important general academic words and phrases that appear in Seymour Simon’s Volcanoes. [RI.4.4] (Appendix B, page 76)

102 Students analyze in detail how the early years of Harriet Tubman (as related by author Ann Petry) contributed to her later becoming a conductor on the Underground Railroad, attending to how the author introduces, illustrates, and elaborates upon the events in Tubman’s life. [RI.6.3](Appendix B 93) Students analyze Thomas Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence, identifying its purpose and evaluating rhetorical features such as the listing of grievances. Students compare and contrast the themes and argument found there to those of other U.S. documents of historical and literary significance, such as the Olive Branch Petition. [RI.11–12.9] Appendix B page 171

103 Students determine the meaning of key terms such as hydraulic, trajectory, and torque as well as other domain-specific words and phrases such as actuators, antilock brakes, and traction control used in Mark Fischetti’s “Working Knowledge: Electronic Stability Control.” [RST.11–12.4] (Appendix B, page 183) Students determine the central ideas found in the Declaration of Sentiments by the Seneca Falls Conference, noting the parallels between it and the Declaration of Independence and providing a summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas of each text and between the texts. [RH.11–12.2] (Appendix B, page 183)

104 Students compare and contrast the figurative and connotative meanings as well as specific word choices in John Donne’s “Valediction Forbidding Mourning” and Emily Dickinson’s “Because I Would Not Stop for Death” in order to determine how the metaphors of the carriage and the compass shape the meaning and tone of each poem. Students analyze the ways both poets use language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful to convey the multiple meanings regarding death contained in each poem. [RL.11–12.4] (Appendix B, page 171)

105 Students determine Richard Hofstadter’s purpose and point of view in his “Abraham Lincoln and the Self-Made Myth,” analyzing how both Hofstadter’s style and content contribute to the eloquent and powerful contrast he draws between the younger, ambitious Lincoln and the sober, more reflective man of the presidential years. [RI.11–12.6] (Appx. B, page 171)

106 N - Note key points. O - Observe options T - Think it through & identify possibilities E - Express Personal Choice With your partner... Determine 3 possible themes

107 Performance Tasks “Evidence of Learning” Active, Engaged Project Learning RELEVANCE

108 LUNCH

109 TED Sir Kenneth Robinson

110 Sir Ken Robinson TED video

111 School Rules Be Safe... Keep hands and objects to yourself (don’t fight) Treat yourself and others with respect (don’t use profanity) Respect the property of others (don’t steal) Dress appropriately (show some class) Follow Directions (carry ID, be on time, leave electronics at home) Be prepared (bring notebooks, pens, pencils and homework to school each day)

112 An education that honors children’s interests and helps them to think deeply about questions that matter is appropriate for affluent children. For disadvantaged children, on the other hand, it is... essential. David Kribble

113 4. If asked about my 1st impression of this article, I would say: (Generalizing) 1. In your own words describe what is meant by “The McEducation of the Negro”? (Recall) 2. Compare how you were taught in school vs. how “poor children” are taught. (Compare and Contrast) 3. In your opinion, who should read this article, explain. (Explain)

114 The success of professional development or professional learning can only be determined by measuring the implementation of strategies, the incorporation of concepts and changes in attitudes that teachers are able to transfer from the staff room to the classroom. Too many times, professional learning is judged based on evaluations filled out by teachers as they are packing up their bags and collecting their car keys. As principals and teachers shift their thinking about the goals of professional learning, they understand that success is measured by the number and level of applications in the classroom following the professional learning sessions.

115 Close Reading

116 Reading is a Verb! Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a word are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

117 State Standards: A Metaphor Curriculum that is an inch deep and a mile wide.

118 Common Core: A Metaphor Common Core Standards are not a tour of the entire museum. They are an in-depth study with a docent, analyzing one piece in depth.

119 Common Core Standards Less Is More

120 Step Book Close Reading With RSVP-E (Text Dependent Questions) R Reading Task S Structure Task V Vocabulary Task P Purpose Task E Expressive Task

121 Step Book R Reading Task S Structure Task V Vocabulary Task P Purpose Task E Expressive Task Options Independent Teacher-Led Buddy Choral Reader’s Theater Echo Blue Tooth Read times Read for detail, deep understanding

122 Step Book S Structure Task V Vocabulary Task P Purpose Task E Expressive Task “What does the text say?” “Show evidence of...” “How do you support that?” Sentence Syntax Compound / Complex Paragraph Structure 1 st Sentence / Last Sentence Text Structure Organization

123 Step Book V Vocabulary Task P Purpose Task E Expressive Task “Everyday”-Spoken Words “Academic”-Written Words “Discipline Specific” Word Games AB Pyramid ABC Graffiti Word Walls Word Cards Card Games, Vocabulary / Word Choice

124 Step Book P Purpose Task E Expressive Task Purpose: “What does text say?” Tone & Tenor: “How do you know?” Evidence? Author’s Style: Explain with examples Point of View: Bias? Perspective? Author’s Purpose Source: Where? Valid? Reliable? Central Theme: How do you know from text?

125 Step Book P Purpose Task E Expressive Task Purpose: “What does text say?” Tone & Tenor: “How do you know?” Evidence? Style: Explain with examples Point of View; Bias? Perspective? Authors Purpose Source Where? Valid? Reliable? Central Theme; How do you know from text?

126 Step Book E Expressive Task Expository: Explanation Persuasion Instruction Argument Narrative: Story / Poem / Play / Song Options One Minute Write MJ Entry Pass Along Story or Para Read – Write - Reflect Express in Writing

127 Step Book Close Reading With RSVP-E (Text Dependent Questions) R Reading Task S Structure Task V Vocabulary Task P Purpose Task E Expressive Task

128 Back of Step Book Supports for ELs Focus on Academic Language Bilingual Word Walls Higher Order Thinking Metacognition Expression & Presentation Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing (Practice of all 4 language domains.) Extended Engagement w/Complex Ideas Focusing on Text and Discourse Differentiate Based on EL Proficiencies Different Strokes for Different Folks

129 End of Day


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