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Discrepancies Between National and International Data By Shelton Kanyanda (Chief Statistician Malawi)

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Presentation on theme: "Discrepancies Between National and International Data By Shelton Kanyanda (Chief Statistician Malawi)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Discrepancies Between National and International Data By Shelton Kanyanda (Chief Statistician Malawi)

2 2 Outline of this presentation forms of data available –indicators 2.1 and 2.3 information on the national data sources used; consultation with countries; method of computation and/or adjustments challenges suggestions

3 3 forms of data available Country Data Country Adjusted Estimated Modeled Global Monitoring Data Non-relevant Not Available

4 4 Country Data –The figure is the one produced and disseminated by the country (including data adjusted BY THE COUNTRY to meet international standards) Country Adjusted –The figure is the one produced and provided by the country, but adjusted by the international agency for international comparability—that is to comply with internationally agreed standards, definitions and classifications (age group, ISCED, etc) Estimated –The figure is estimated by the international agency, when corresponding country data on a specific year or set of years are not available, or when multiple sources exist, or there are issues of data quality. Estimates are based on national data, such as surveys or administrative records, or other sources but on the same variable being estimated.

5 5 Modeled –The figure is modeled by the agency when there is a complete lack of data on the variable being estimated. The model is based on a set of covariates— other variables for which data are available and that can explain the phenomenon (example: maternal mortality or annual poverty from LSMS) Global Monitoring Data –The figure is regularly produced by the designated agency for the global monitoring, based on country data. However, there is no corresponding figure at the country level, because the indicator is defined for international monitoring only (example: population below 1$ a day) Non-relevant –The figure is not available because the indicator—as defined for the global monitoring—does not apply to the circumstances of the specific country, and therefore is not reported Not Available –A figure is not provided, or the method by which the figure was calculated is unknown

6 6 information on the national data sources used Indicator 2.1 Net Enrolment Ratio (Primary) –In most cases, Ministries of Education provid data through EMIS –Other countries also use publications from Statistical Offices _______________________________________ –Surveys help to check over reporting from schools through net attendance ratios

7 7 Net enrolment (primary)

8 8

9 9 Net enrolment ratio (primary) –The principal UIS questionnaire respondents at the national ministries of education and the official UNESCO National Commissions for Education are consulted prior to the dissemination of all related indicators list of consultation with countries

10 10 method of computation and/or adjustments Indicator 2.1 Net enrolment ratio (Primary) Number of students enrolled in Primary who are of the official primary school age (including those of Primary school age students enrolled in Secondary) divided by the population for the same age-group and multiply the result by 100. Example: LESOTHO 2004, NER = 76.2 because the number of students enrolled in Primary who are of the official primary school age (including those of Primary school age students enrolled in Secondary) was 280,884, which was then divided by the population for the same age-group (368,486) and multiplied by 100.

11 11 Indicator 2.3 Literacy rate (15-24 yr olds) Census : Botwana (’91); Ethiopia (’94); Ghana (’00); Malawi (’98) (08) ;Mauritius (’90) (’00); Mozambique (’97) (07); Zambia(’90); Surveys : Botwana (’03); Ethiopia (’04); Kenya (’00); Madagascar (’00); Zambia (’99); Malawi (’98) (’05) Estimates : Liberia (’94) (’04); Rarely from administrative data

12 12 Literacy rate (15-24 yr olds) Population aged years literate X 100 Total population years Adjustments Not specified literacy status not known/ specified population removed from the calculation –Literate (15-24 yr) + Literate<>Illiterate (15-24 yr) + Illiterate (15-24) = 100 Computation Literacy rate (15-24 yr olds)

13 13 Literacy rate (15-24 yr olds) Population aged years literate X 100 Total population years Adjustments Not specified literacy status not known/ specified population removed from the calculation –Literate (15-24 yr) + Literate<>Illiterate (15-24 yr) + Illiterate (15-24) = 100 Computation Literacy rate (15-24 yr olds)

14 14 list of consultation with countries In most cases consultations with Statistical Offices Interactions are also done with countries/ institutions during data collection and/or processing

15 15 Challenges Data Gaps/Discrepancies –Lack of baseline data (i.e., 1990) to track the progress at the national and sub national –Lack of consistency of nationally generated data –Lack of sustainability of some surveys (which are sources of MDG statistics) as some of these are dependent on international communities

16 16 Dissemination –Problems in timely dissemination of data –Poor electronic devices for disseminating information/data –Multiple sources of the same indicator Coordination –Weak coordination among the statistical activities in generating MDG indicators –Weak (or just developing) National Statistical System (coordination between and among statistical office and other statistical units on the one hand, and data producers and data users on the other, and international development intervention)

17 17 Human Resource Lack of manpower especially in the area of statistics to monitor the MDGs

18 18 Suggestions Data Gaps –There is a need to establish linkage/strengthen institutional capacity and networking of NSOs and other line ministries which are sources of data. Needs financial and technical assistance on this concern. –Appropriate/best country consultation mechanism should be explored to validate country data or reconcile country and internationally-estimated data – Advocacy on the use of international estimation procedures/ process, including the reasons for the differences should be strengthened –Better documentation of approaches adopted/methodologies applied should be undertaken

19 19 Dissemination –Need to acquire appropriate electronic devices –Need for timely processing of data Coordination –Need for sound development and implementation of National Statistical Development Plan (NSDP) –Strengthen the role of the NSOs in the collection and compilation of MDG indicators

20 20 END OF MY PRESENTATION THANK YOU


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