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1 Engineering 101 Humanities 200 Technology and Society Unit 1: Space and Time Joe Mahoney, Steve Muench, Scott Rutherford Department of Civil and Environmental.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Engineering 101 Humanities 200 Technology and Society Unit 1: Space and Time Joe Mahoney, Steve Muench, Scott Rutherford Department of Civil and Environmental."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Engineering 101 Humanities 200 Technology and Society Unit 1: Space and Time Joe Mahoney, Steve Muench, Scott Rutherford Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Fall 2005

2 2 Topics for Space and Time (which translates to “transportation”) October 10-11: Introduction to Major Transportation Systems-I (Joe Mahoney) October 12: Introduction to Major Transportation Systems-II (Joe Mahoney) October 17: How Transportation Vehicles Have Affected Society (Steve Muench) October 18: Public Policy Importance of Transportation Decisions (Scott Rutherford)

3 3 Topics Description of mini-projects What is a Civil Engineer? General Transportation Statistics Transportation Infrastructure –Local Transportation Modes –Highways and Bridges Bridges Highways/Pavements (October 11) –Airports (October 11) Transportation Vehicles (October 11) Epilog: Energy for Transportation (October 11)

4 4 Highways and Bridges (continued from yesterday)

5 5 Highways/pavements

6 6 First Ave, Seattle, 1878 (looking north from Yesler Way) From this view of 1 st Avenue to……..

7 Pavements—they are everywhere you look.

8 8 1915—Pacific Highway Today

9 9 HMA cores from various state highways inches

10 Bituminous Surface Treatment Flexible Pavement

11 11 Asphalt Concrete (HMA) Overlay—US 2

12 12 Placing HMA on I-90 near Spokane

13 13 Infrared imaging of HMA during the delivery and placing process

14 14 End Dump/No MTV Infrared imaging of HMA during the delivery and placing process

15 15 PCC paving—15 th Ave NE

16 Jointed Doweled PCC Paving Dowel Bars in Cages Ready for Placement of PCC US 395

17 17 PCC Construction US 395 Construction of a Doweled Construction Joint—US 395 near Ritzville, WA

18 18 Illustration of Contraction Joint Crack and Aggregate Interlock

19 Dowel Bar Retrofit—I-90 near Cle Elum, WA

20 20 Airports

21 21 UW Shell House—Originally built as a hangar for the Aviation Training Corps in

22 22 Early Airports First airport –Established by the Wright brothers in 1904 –Near Dayton, Ohio –90 acre pasture –Now the location of Wright-Patterson AFB. 1920’s –Airports were relatively small in size—typically 40 to 500 acres –Turf covered landing areas

23 23 City Airport Area (acres) Ownership Late 1920’s CurrentLate 1920’sCurrent Atlanta3003,800City of Atlanta Boston402,384 City of Boston and State of Massachusetts Massport Chicago3207,000City of Chicago Fort Worth17517,574City of Fort Worth Cities of Dallas-Fort Worth Los Angeles803,500City of Los Angeles Philadelphia1252,200City of Philadelphia Phoenix1602,200City of Phoenix Pittsburgh4012,500City and CountyAllegheny County Early US airports

24 24 New Airport Size—US Airport First Year of Operation Size (acres) Distance from CBD to Airport (miles) Houston Intercontinental Airport (IAH) 19688,80022 Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) ,57417 Denver International Airport (DEN)199434,00018

25 Rank by Population City Land Area (acres) 1Seattle53,620 2Spokane36,669 3Tacoma30,572 4Bellevue17,229 5Everett19,642 6Federal Way12,736 7Yakima10,318 8Bellingham15,408 9Vancouver11,144 10Renton10,633 11Kennewick12,340 12Kirkland6,669 13Kent12,638 14Redmond9,869 15Bremerton13,617 16Olympia11,601 17Auburn13,056 18Richland20,862 19Longview8,083 20Edmonds4,794 Acreage Covered by Washington’s 20 Most Populous Cities

26 26 Changes in Airport Characteristics and Operations Over a 60 Year Period Characteristic Time Period Late 1920’s Early 2000’s U.S. AirportsNon-U.S. Airports Airport Size 200 acres4,700 acres3,400 acres Runway Length 1,500 feet10,000 feet Airport Location Close to cities-several miles from CBD 10 miles from CBD12 miles from CBD Annual Passengers Up to 40,000Up to 79 millionUp to 63 million Annual Aircraft Operations Up to 10,000-20,000 Up to About 1,000,000About 500,000

27 27 Runway Lengths JF Kennedy International Airport, New York –14,600 ft. (longest US airport runway) Kennedy Space Center, Florida –15,000 ft. Edwards AFB, California –24,000 ft. White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico –35,000 ft. Source: Seattle Times, August 9,2005

28 28 John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York JFK Photo source: Google Earth

29 29 JFK Airport New York Photo source: Google Earth

30 30 Edwards AFB, California

31 Edwards AFB California

32 32 Kennedy Space Center, Florida Photo source: Google Earth

33 33 Kennedy Space Center, Florida Photo source: Google Earth

34 34 Kennedy Space Center, Florida Photo source: Google Earth

35 35 Sea-Tac South Concourse 1949

36 36 Sea-Tac Center Terminal Expansion Source: Seattle Times, August 7, 2005

37 37 Recent Expansion Costs at Sea-Tac Source: Seattle Times, August 7, 2005

38 38 Total Annual Passenger Demand—US

39 39 Transportation Vehicles

40 40 Aircraft

41 41 Charles Lindbergh and the Spirit of St. Louis, Sand Point, September 13, 1927

42 42 United Airline DC-3 at Boeing Field 1940

43 43 Boeing 377 at Sea-Tac, circa 1949

44 44 Boeing 314 LaGuardia Airport

45 45 LaGuardia Airport

46 46 Boeing 377 at JF Kennedy International Airport

47 47 JF Kennedy International Airport

48 48 Boeing 777 at Sea-Tac

49 49 B777 with Dual Tridum Gear

50 50 Boeing A has six million parts, half of which are fasteners. A consists of 147,000 pounds (66,150 kg) of high-strength aluminum. The has 16 main landing gear tires and two nose landing gear tires. Source: Boeing Company

51 51 Boeing Commercial Aircraft—Model 40 to ( ) FactorIncrease Passengersx210 Weightx155 RangeX13 SpeedX4 Boeing Model 40A Boeing Model passengers 420 passengers

52 52 Trucks and Buses

53 53 Kenworths—past to present

54 54 Manufacturer truck classes

55 55 WSDOT length vehicle restrictions

56 56 WSDOT length vehicle restrictions

57 57 WSDOT length vehicle restrictions

58 58 Truck and bus weights Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) based on three criteria –Tire size –Axle weight –Axle spacing Maximum GVW and axle weightsMaximums Single axle20,000 lb Tandem axle34,000 lb Steer axle600 lb per inch width of tire GVW105,500 lb

59 59 A bit of Washington traffic…

60 60 Seattle Traffic Flow Map August 16, 2005

61 61

62 62 US 99 Seattle All traffic data from 2004 WSDOT estimates. ADT = 71,000

63 63 I-5 Seattle ADT = 242,000 Trucks = 5%

64 64 State Route 172 near Withrow ADT = 160

65 65 I-5 Seattle Ship Canal Bridge ADT = 185,000 Trucks = 5%

66 66 State Route 520 Seattle ADT = 102,000 Trucks = 3%

67 67 I-90 Seattle ADT = 150,000 Trucks = 6%

68 I-405 near Bellevue ADT = 191,000 Trucks = 7%

69 I-90 Snoqualmie Pass ADT = 27,000 Trucks = 18%

70 70 I-90 Spokane ADT = 104,000 Trucks = 22%

71 71 I-90 Idaho Stateline ADT = 42,000 Trucks = 10%

72 72 Epilog: Energy and Transportation

73 73 Epilogue: Energy and Transportation

74 74 Primary Energy Consumption per Capita Tonnes per capita

75 75 Crude Oil Consumption (barrels per day) Country or Location Consumption of Crude% Change % of World Total Worldwide68,219,00080,757, US17,719,00020,517, China3,145,0006,684, Source data from BP Statistical Review of World Energy—June 2005

76 76 Crude Oil Reserves (barrels) Country or Location Crude Oil Reserves as of 2003 (barrels) Reserves to Production Ratios (years) Worldwide1,188,600,000, US 29,400,000, China 17,100,000, Source data from BP Statistical Review of World Energy—June 2005

77 77 Crude oil prices since 1861 BP Statistical Review of World Energy—June 2005

78 78 Road Use Growth From the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics 2003

79 79 The increasing cost of paving Source: WSDOT,

80 80 Class poll: Who deserves the most blame for higher energy prices? Oil companies% Foreign countries% Politicians% Environmentalists% People who drive gas guzzlers% Other, all of them or don’t know%

81 81 “Who deserves the most blame for higher energy prices?” Oil companies30% Foreign countries22% Politicians21% Environmentalists9% People who drive gas guzzlers7% Other, all of them or don’t know11% Source: AP poll of 1,000 US adults August 9-11, 2005 (from Seattle Times) Of course how people respond is, in part, a function of the question!

82 82 Ships and Shipping

83 83 The schooner Wawona of Robinson Fisheries at Anacortes, WA—September 1915 University of Washington Libraries. Special Collections Division

84 84 Ship under construction at Pacific American Fisheries Yard, Bellingham, WA—September 1916 University of Washington Libraries. Special Collections Division

85 85 Ships under construction at Pacific American Fisheries Yard, Bellingham, WA—September 1916 University of Washington Libraries. Special Collections Division

86 86 Montlake Ditch, 1901 (looking east toward Capitol Hill)


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