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SLDS State Support Team Webinar SLDS Webinar1 The presentation will begin at approximately 12:00 p.m. ET Information on joining the teleconference can.

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Presentation on theme: "SLDS State Support Team Webinar SLDS Webinar1 The presentation will begin at approximately 12:00 p.m. ET Information on joining the teleconference can."— Presentation transcript:

1 SLDS State Support Team Webinar SLDS Webinar1 The presentation will begin at approximately 12:00 p.m. ET Information on joining the teleconference can be found on the “Info” tab in the upper left of this screen. Be sure to use the “Attendee ID” number on the Info tab when dialing in to associate your name with your phone. In order to cut down on background noise, please mute your phone by dialing *6 upon entry into the meeting. During the question and answer portion of this presentation: You can re-enter *6 to unmute your phone and ask a question; or Type your question into the Q&A panel below the participant list and click “Send.” A copy of this presentation and a link to the recording will be shared with the IES Grantees and EIMAC listservs. Strategies for Engaging Early Learning Stakeholders

2 Strategies for Engaging Early Learning Stakeholders

3 Panelists Amy Nicholas, DaSy/Johns Hopkins University Elliot Regenstein, Ounce of Prevention Fund Hilary Shager, Wisconsin (Hilary is not able to join us today but is available for questions via ) Missy Cochenour, State Support Team 3 Welcome

4 Provide an overview of how to engage stakeholders in developing an early childhood integrated data system (ECIDS) Provide strategies learned and shared by other states as they have engaged early childhood stakeholders Share resources to help states developing an ECIDS to engage the appropriate stakeholders Discuss the difference between stakeholder engagement and data governance Objective 4

5 Overview 5

6 6 What is a stakeholder? What is stakeholder engagement? Overview

7 Stakeholders: Individuals who are either affected by or responsible for the outcomes of a project or initiative Stakeholder engagement: The use of stakeholders as participants in a collaborative decisionmaking process that guides the creation and execution of a defined scope of work Overview 7

8 8 Why should we engage stakeholders while developing an ECIDS? Why should stakeholders care? Overview

9 Why should we engage stakeholders? Generally, to inform the process of developing an ECIDS to ensure it meets their needs as the users. If the goal is to help stakeholders make better decisions through better data, it is essential to engage stakeholders in identifying their key decisions as well as what data are needed to help make those decisions. Overview 9

10 Why should stakeholders care? In a competitive funding environment, data systems do not always have a natural constituency. Engaging stakeholders early in the process helps them understand how it can help them with their work, which in turn encourages them to become advocates for the system. Overview 10

11 11 Who are the appropriate stakeholders to engage while developing an ECIDS?

12 State Advocates and Leaders Early Learning Councils Governor’s Office Cross-agency leadership Program Representatives Early learning program administrators (cross agencies/programs) Head Start Collaboration Office Partners K12/P-20 SLDS partners Parents and families Universities and researchers Private local and statewide EC foundations and forums Identifying Stakeholders 12

13 How to categorize essential stakeholders Identify stakeholders who are essential to the project in terms of roles, then in terms of people: Identifying Stakeholders o Supporter o Implementer o Leader o User o Decisionmaker o Consultant Categorize key agencies, leaders (decisionmakers and spokespersons), and workers Document the process for selecting various stakeholders 13

14 Why is the state’s Early Childhood Advisory Council important? The councils were designed to provide a centralized coordinating body for strategic planning and early learning data analysis. The councils are required by federal legislation to have diverse representation, giving states a “ready made” stakeholder group. Many state councils have already developed or are in the process of developing a data workgroup/committee to look at coordinating data among early learning programs. Federal legislation for the councils includes questions that must be answered annually to the state’s governor, along with recommendations for future early learning state investments. Councils are required to make recommendations for the design of a unified data system. 14 Identifying Stakeholders

15 Wisconsin stakeholders engaged from the beginning: Governor’s Early Childhood Advisory Council (ECAC) Cross-agency partners and leadership P-20W SLDS partners Early learning program administrators (cross agencies/programs) Head Start Collaboration Office Parents and families Universities and researchers Private local and statewide EC foundations and forums Why? ECAC provided some funding To inform To gather input To solicit participation in workgroups Wisconsin Example 15

16 Plan for organizational change Bringing on new stakeholders can be unexpected, such as during a leadership transition. To prepare, develop signature slides that quickly and concisely speak to the vision, mission, and purpose of the project, and develop training materials for new staff and/or leadership. Keep up with changes in staff and leadership, and acclimate new members to the project plan quickly. 16 Wisconsin Example

17 Strategies to engage stakeholders while developing an ECIDS 17

18 One of the most important things in the process is that each stakeholder knows why they are involved in the conversation and what their role is in the process. The following strategies include ideas to consider when developing a plan for successful stakeholder engagement. Strategies for Engagement 18

19 19 Strategy 1: Conduct an ECIDS data roundtable with stakeholders

20 Wisconsin conducted a data roundtable during the feasibility study (planning) year of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Data System (EC LDS) Project Wisconsin Example 20

21 Goal of Wisconsin’s Data Roundtable: Provide information about the EC LDS and solicit support Provide examples of EC LDS models from other states Develop underlying policy questions Initiate alignment of data elements to key policy questions Review and improve the project communication plan Initiate workgroups to make recommendations for governance, unique identifiers, capacity, sustainability, potential system architecture, and stakeholder engagement Participants: All stakeholders Wisconsin Example 21

22 How it was done: All day meeting, offsite, with snacks and lunch provided so participants could work throughout the day Presenters were various state leaders, SST, and Elliot Started with an overview and moved into discussion groups Sent out a survey afterward to get the next steps started (workgroup-development volunteers from stakeholders) Data Roundtable Report to summarize the day Wisconsin Example 22

23 Other states that have done a data roundtable: Oklahoma Georgia Connecticut Data Roundtable 23

24 24 Strategy 2: Use stakeholders to establish the essential policy and program questions to be answered using the ECIDS

25 States that have created essential questions used their stakeholders strategically to help develop questions Started with ECDC questions Tailored the questions to meet their needs Essential Questions 25

26 Essential Questions 1. Identify key end users 2. Identify key questions 3. Identify specific sub- questions 4. Identify the data fields that answer the key questions 5. Identify where, if anywhere, those fields are collected 6. Identify changes needed for data collection 7. Identify how to add and link data to answer key questions 26

27 In July 2009, ECDC convened a meeting with thought leaders around the country to prioritize key policy questions states want and need to answer. What’s going on with kids in terms of access and development? What does program quality look like? What does the workforce look like and are they well-supported? Once the collaborative developed these key policy questions, the next step was to understand what type of information and system structure is needed for states to get these answers. The 10 fundamentals developed by ECDC was created to give states a framework for getting at these answers. Essential Questions 27

28 Resulting ECDC questions: 1.Are children, birth to age 5, on track to succeed when they enter school and beyond? 2.Which children have access to high-quality early care and education programs? 3.Is the quality of programs improving? 4.What are the characteristics of effective programs? 5.How prepared is the early care and education workforce to provide effective education and care for all children? 6.What policies and investments lead to a skilled and stable early care and education workforce? Essential Questions 28

29 National guidance was provided by the Early Childhood Data Collaborative, as well as the Data Quality Campaign Guidance was considered in the creation of the five questions Wisconsin wants to answer Questions were vetted by early childhood system stakeholders during the Early Childhood Collaborating Partners video conference on August 11, 2011 Wisconsin Example 29

30 Wisconsin tailored the ECDC questions to meet the state’s needs: 1.Are children, birth to 5, on track to succeed when they enter school and beyond? 2.Which children and families are and are not being served by which programs/services? 3.Which children have access to high-quality early childhood programs and services? 4.What characteristics of programs are associated with positive child outcomes for which children? 5.What are the education and economic returns on early childhood investments? Wisconsin Example 30

31 31 Strategy 3: Use stakeholder workgroups to help inform the process of ECIDS development by using interest areas to keep users engaged

32 Why are workgroups important? A way to keep stakeholders involved Use the strengths of each stakeholder Can move quickly in smaller groups that make recommendations Stakeholder Workgroups 32

33 Stakeholder workgroups produced recommendation papers on the topics of governance, unique identifiers, capacity, sustainability, system architecture, and stakeholder engagement Composition of workgroups: o Cross-departmental program members o Non-governmental participants by invitation o Enlisted the help of SST to learn best practice approaches to topic Wisconsin Example 33

34 Lessons learned from states: Illinois identified roles that are clearly roles for state agency stakeholders as opposed to external stakeholders (targeted group and outcome) When state agencies are engaged in contracting and bidding work but want outside advice, the state can provide waivers to allow outside partners to participate in strategic conversations without violating procurement laws. Outside partners who sign the waivers commit that they will not share information with potential bidders or bid themselves. Stakeholder Workgroups 34

35 35 Strategy 4: Develop communication tools to reach various stakeholders and the agencies they represent

36 Communication tools are important because they: Help keep stakeholders informed Solicit feedback Allow representation from many agencies Communication Tools 36

37 To develop stakeholder trust in the process: Be responsive and timely. Use technology to help—webinars, web pages, conference calls, electronic communication methods, and document servers can assist with collaborative planning. Give stakeholders dates and times when the communication team will deliver materials and publications. Build trust among these groups by sticking to the state’s project plan and facilitating ongoing communication. Above all, listen and follow up promptly. Communication Tools 37

38 Overall Communication Plan Specifics: Website Newsletters Meetings/Presentations (Status/Planning, Project Kick-Off, Departmental Briefings, Out Reach to Community Partners) Data Roundtable Data Governance Workshop Wisconsin Example 38

39 39 What do stakeholders need to engage in ECIDS activities?

40 Program stakeholders must understand: The state data landscape The benefits of a coordinated data system to their program The data their program can offer to add depth and breadth to the system Their program-specific audiences and data consumers, and those individuals’ priorities Questions they would like to answer but are not yet able to Stakeholder Needs 40

41 Understanding these things gives stakeholders the opportunity to: Realize the benefits of the work Represent their program’s interest so that benefits are realized Identify and articulate what they would like to accomplish by being involved in the work Stakeholder Needs 41

42 Helpful Tools SLDS Stakeholder Engagement Plan Template (applicable for Early Learning) Early Learning Planning Guide and Self-Assessment Wisconsin EC LDS project website: (Available documents: Feasibility Study Communication Plan, Work Group Recommendations, Roundtable Agenda and Report, and more) Stakeholder Needs 42

43 What is the difference between stakeholder engagement and data governance? 43

44 44 Stakeholder Engagement vs. Data Governance Stakeholders Data Governance Membership Stakeholder engagement: Users of the ECIDS data and those directly or indirectly affected by its use (including data governance members). Data governance: Representatives (leadership, program, and IT staff) from each agency or program contributing data to the ECIDS.

45 45 Stakeholder Engagement vs. Data Governance Stakeholders Data Governance Level of Engagement Stakeholder engagement: Varies by stakeholder group. Will increase and decrease over the course of the project and resulting program depending upon need and focus. Data governance: High and consistent throughout the life of the project and program. Will continue after the system is developed.

46 46 Stakeholder Engagement vs. Data Governance Stakeholders Data Governance Responsibilities/Decisionmaking Authority Stakeholder engagement: Members inform and influence the overall direction, priorities, and implementation of the ECIDS. Data governance: Members determine the overall direction, priorities, and implementation of the ECIDS.

47 SLDS State Support Team Webinar 47 Questions or comments?

48 State Support Team & SLDS Team: Missy Cochenour, (909) Maddie Fromell, (202) Panelists: Amy Nicholas, Elliot Regenstein, Hilary Shager, 48 Contacts


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