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Visual 3.1 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Unit 3: Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives.

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Presentation on theme: "Visual 3.1 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Unit 3: Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives."— Presentation transcript:

1 Visual 3.1 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Unit 3: Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives

2 Visual 3.2 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives  Describe the delegation of authority process.  Describe scope of authority.  Define management by objectives.  Explain the importance of preparedness plans and agreements. Unit Objectives

3 Visual 3.3 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Authority Authority is a right or obligation to act on behalf of a department, agency, or jurisdiction.

4 Visual 3.4 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Within your jurisdiction or agency, who has the authority for protecting citizens and responding to incidents? Who’s Responsible?

5 Visual 3.5 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives An Incident Commander’s scope of authority is derived:  From existing laws, agency policies, and procedures, and/or  Through a delegation of authority from the agency administrator or elected official. Scope of Authority

6 Visual 3.6 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives  Grants authority to carry out specific functions.  Is issued by chief elected official, chief executive officer, or agency administrator in writing or verbally.  Allows the Incident Commander to assume command.  Does NOT relieve the granting authority of ultimate responsibility for the incident. Delegation of Authority Agency Executive Incident Commander

7 Visual 3.7 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives  When the incident is outside the Incident Commander’s jurisdiction.  When the incident scope is complex or beyond existing authorities.  When required by law or procedures. Delegation of Authority: When Needed

8 Visual 3.8 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives When would an Incident Commander in your jurisdiction or agency need a delegation of authority? Discussion Question

9 Visual 3.9 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Should include:  Legal authorities and restrictions.  Financial authorities and restrictions.  Reporting requirements.  Demographic issues.  Political implications.  Agency or jurisdictional priorities.  Plan for public information management.  Process for communications.  Plan for ongoing incident evaluation. Delegation of Authority: Elements

10 Visual 3.10 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives How do you ensure that the delegating authority remains an active part of the incident response? Discussion Question

11 Visual 3.11 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Instructions: Working with your team... 1.Read the case study in your Student Manual. 2.Identify the steps you would take to keep the agency executives involved in this incident. 3.List the steps on chart paper. 4.Choose a spokesperson. Be prepared to present your findings to the class in 10 minutes. Activity: Delegating Authority

12 Visual 3.12 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Within his or her scope of authority, the Incident Commander establishes incident objectives, then determines strategies, resources, and ICS structure. Implementing Authorities

13 Visual 3.13 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives  ICS is managed by objectives.  Objectives are communicated throughout the entire ICS organization through the incident planning process. Management by Objectives

14 Visual 3.14 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Step 1: Understand agency policy and direction. Step 2: Assess incident situation. Step 3: Establish incident objectives. Step 4: Select appropriate strategy or strategies to achieve objectives. Step 5: Perform tactical direction. Step 6: Provide necessary followup. Establishing and Implementing Objectives

15 Visual 3.15 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives The first responder must determine:  Nature and magnitude of the incident.  Hazards and safety concerns.  Initial priorities and immediate resource requirements.  The location of the Incident Command Post and Staging Area.  Entrance and exit routes for responders. Initial Response: Conduct a Size-Up

16 Visual 3.16 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Overall Priorities Throughout the incident, objectives are established based on the following priorities: #1: Life Safety #2: Incident Stabilization #3: Property Preservation

17 Visual 3.17 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Effective incident objectives are:  Specific.  Measurable.  Action oriented.  Realistic  Time sensitive. SMART Incident Objectives

18 Visual 3.18 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Instructions: Working with your team... 1.Review the scenario and incident objectives described in your Student Manual. 2.Determine what other incident objectives you would add. 3.Write your answers on chart paper. 4.Select a team spokesperson and be prepared to share your answers with the class in 5 minutes. Activity: Adding Incident Objectives

19 Visual 3.19 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives State what will be accomplished. Establish the general plan or direction for accomplishing the incident objectives. Specify how the strategies will be executed. Objectives, Strategies, and Tactics

20 Visual 3.20 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Elements of an Incident Action Plan Every IAP must have four elements:  What do we want to do?  Who is responsible for doing it?  How do we communicate with each other?  What is the procedure if someone is injured?

21 Visual 3.21 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives The most common preparedness plans are:  Federal, State, or local Emergency Operations Plans (EOPs).  Standard operating guidelines (SOGs).  Standard operating procedures (SOPs).  Jurisdictional or agency policies. Preparedness Plans and Agreements

22 Visual 3.22 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives  EOPs are developed at the Federal, State, and local levels to provide a uniform response to all hazards.  EOPs written after October 2005 must be consistent with NIMS. Emergency Operations Plans (EOPs)

23 Visual 3.23 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives NIMS states that:  Mutual aid and assistance agreements are agreements between organizations that provide a mechanism to quickly obtain emergency assistance.  Jurisdictions should be party to agreements with the appropriate organizations from which they expect to receive, or to which they expect to provide, assistance. Mutual Aid and Assistance Agreements (1 of 2)

24 Visual 3.24 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Mutual aid:  Is the voluntary provision of resources by organizations to assist each other.  Allows jurisdictions to share resources among mutual aid partners. Mutual Aid and Assistance Agreements (2 of 2)

25 Visual 3.25 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives  Local jurisdictions participate in mutual aid through agreements with neighboring jurisdictions.  States can participate in mutual aid through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC).  Federal agencies offer mutual aid to each other and to States, tribes, and territories under the National Planning Frameworks. Mutual Aid and Assistance: All Levels

26 Visual 3.26 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Plans may include:  Hazards and risks.  Resources in the area.  Other formal agreements.  Contact information for agency administrators and response personnel. Information Derived From Plans

27 Visual 3.27 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives What preparedness plans, agreements, and standard operating procedures must you follow in responding to incidents? Discussion Question

28 Visual 3.28 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Instructions: Working in your team... 1.Review the scenario, scenario map, and resource list in your Student Manuals. 2.Develop incident objectives for the next 12 hours. 3.Next, identify your general strategy for accomplishing these objectives. 4.Select a spokesperson and be prepared to present your work in 30 minutes. Activity: Developing Incident Objectives

29 Visual 3.29 Delegation of Authority & Management by Objectives Are you now able to:  Describe the delegation of authority process?  Describe scope of authority?  Define management by objectives?  Explain the importance of preparedness plans and agreements? Summary


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