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Is Arkansas Higher Education Ready for Renewable Energy? Jim Purcell.

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Presentation on theme: "Is Arkansas Higher Education Ready for Renewable Energy? Jim Purcell."— Presentation transcript:

1 Is Arkansas Higher Education Ready for Renewable Energy? Jim Purcell

2 Is Arkansas Higher Education Ready? Yes Responding with courses, new majors, research, and industrial support Community Colleges Universities Historically, higher education’s response to new economies has been haphazard. --False starts --Unsteady funding --Fluctuating Enrollment

3 Listed below are the 12 Green Occupations Categories determined by O*NET to illustrate jobs in the green economy. After reading each, please indicate if your College has Current, Planned, or Interest in instructional/training programs for any or each of these categories: Renewable Energy Generation Transportation Energy Efficiency Green Construction Energy Trading Energy and Carbon Capture and Storage Research, Design, Consulting Environment Protection Agriculture-Forestry Manufacturing Recycling and Waste Reduction Governmental-Regulatory Administration

4 Current Programs Renewab En EffTranspEn EffGr constEn TradCC&SRDCEnv PrAgriMftRecycRegul ANC ASUN ATU/O CCCU A EACC MSCC NPCC NAC OTC PCCUA PCCUA /D PTC RVT UAFS Total # Current Programs

5 HART Consortium AATYC Heart of Arkansas Regional Training (HART) Consortium (NEW-2009) Two-year colleges with central Arkansas service area counties and manufacturing technology skills training have organized to provide new “green” industry training and to inject “green” methods/concepts into existing technical programs. Consortium includes Pulaski Technical College, Arkansas State University-Beebe, Ouachita Technical College, UA Community College at Morrilton, National Park Community College, and Southeast Arkansas College.

6 2010 Enrollment in Renewable Energy Technology School degree _code award Summer II 2009 Fall 2009 Spring 2010 ANC3150AAS ASUN2150TC 410 EACC2150TC 1 EACC3150AAS 1728 MSCC1150CP 22 MSCC2150TC 22 MSCC3150AAS 4051

7 DOL Grant for Green Tech Office of Energy Management – ARRA Stimulus -2 centers of Excellence NWACC and PTC (1 million each) – Develop curriculum for colleges: » Energy Auditors » Green Construction – DWS – apply for grants to provide short term training in non credit modules million – Biofuels Energy technology - PCCUA

8 Projected Annual Job Growth by Sector Source: IHS Global Insight. March 2010.

9 Current Approach: Embedded in current curriculum Short-term training – fastest Responding to emerging needs When price for gas and electric rise there will be more enthusiasm We must be ready

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12 Wind energy has become an important component of Arkansas's economic growth  Mitsubishi is coming to Ft. Smith  $100 million investment in the wind-energy components industry.  400 full-time employees  The fifth wind-energy industry supplier to come to Arkansas.  $350 million invested/2,200 jobs  Why does a potentially $60 billion industry like Arkansas?

13  Why Arkansas?  Surrounded by six of the top wind states.  Passed legislation that awards an income-tax exemption to companies that make blades and parts.  The Arkansas Energy Office made available $1.78 million in rebates to Arkansans who installed renewable energy systems in their homes  State facility renovations The future of energy in the country is invested in the transition from fossil fuels toward clean, renewable sources.

14 Iowa Lakes Community College

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16 Michael Lind, Policy Director of the New America Foundation’s economic-growth program Stasis is most evident in an area where we assume we are way ahead of our predecessors: technology. – The gadgets of the information age have had nothing like the transformative effects on life and industry that indoor electric lighting, refrigerators, electric and natural gas ovens and indoor plumbing produced in the early to mid-20 th century. – The gasoline-powered car was invented in the 1880s, but mass automobile use had to wait until the 1920s. – Global jet transportation relies on the gas turbine, which was developed in the 1930s, and global shipping uses the diesel engine, invented in the 1890s. – Most electricity today is generated by a variant of the steam turbine that has been around since the 1880s.

17 The 21 st century is likely to be the second age of the automobile. Today there are nearly 668 million cars in the world; by 2050 there may be 3 billion. Many cars, perhaps most, will be powered by energy sources other than gasoline. Most energy will still be derived from fossil fuels, and nuclear power will account for an increasing share of global electricity production, while wind and solar power will still be negligible. Michael Lind, Policy Director of the New America Foundation’s economic-growth program Prediction

18 Time Magazine, March 2010 The international Energy Agency estimates that $11.7 trillion in new investments in oil and gas supplies will be needed between now and 2030 to meet global energy demand. And with oil, natural gas and coal projected to meet nearly 80% of global demand over this same period, the need to find new sources of hydrocarbons – efficiently and sustainably – has never been more important. Fossil Fuels are Still Needed – Arkansas is also a player

19 Luddites A social movement of British textile artisans in the nineteenth century who protested—often by destroying mechanized looms—against the changes produced by the Industrial Revolution, which they felt were leaving them without work and changing their entire way of life.

20 A Little History of the World E. H. Gombrich However, other machines changed the world even more profoundly. These were the machines which made use of the forces of nature instead of manpower. Take spinning and weaving, for example – work that had always been done by artisans. All of these developments produced a tremendous upheaval in people’s lives. Everything was turned upside-down and hardly anything stayed where it had been. Think for a moment how secure and orderly everything had been in the guilds of the medieval cities!

21 A Little History of the World E. H. Gombrich Anyone who owned a mechanical loom could, with the help of one or two assistants – perhaps his wife and children – do more work than a hundred trained weavers. So whatever became of all the weavers in a town into which a mechanical loom was introduced?... they woke up one day to discover that they weren’t needed any more. Everything it had taken them years to learn, first as apprentices and then as journeymen, was useless.

22 Speed to Market and Close to Customer Ed Barlow, Futurist: 1.Implement a series of initiatives that expedite the number of degrees produced and the speed at which degrees are produced. 2.Enhance the production of degrees in high –demand programs that are needed for the modern Arkansas economy. 3.Incentivize students to complete a degree and to work in Arkansas.

23 State Per Capita Personal Income v. Share of Adult Population with Bachelor's Degree or Higher (2008) DC TX NM FL ND NC AL IN LA MI WI SD WY TN NV AR IA OH ID SC KY MS WV MO ME AZ VA NJ PA MD MT CT MA CO NE AK GA HI KSOR DE IL RIMN WA UT VT NHNY CA OK No state with a low proportion of Bachelor’s degrees has a high per capita income. No state with a high proportion of Bachelor’s degrees has a low per capita income. 2008= 18.8% 2002= 19.7%

24 By the end of this decade, more than 60% of jobs will require college education 1 26% Today, 26% of Arkansas’s young adults aged have a college degree. 2 1 Carnevale, T., Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, High-growth fields based on national projections of total new and replacement jobs. 2 “College degree” means an associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or higher. National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), 2008 (from U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample File.) Is 26% enough? What percentage of our young adults have a college degree? (associates or bachelors)

25 Current percentage of young adults (25-34) with a college degree 3 3 “College degree” means an associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or higher. National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), 2008 (from U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample File.)

26 Current percentage of young adults (25-34) with a college degree 3 3 “College degree” means an associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or higher. National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), 2008 (from U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample File.)

27 U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 51 st (16.7%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Bachelors & Higher Percent of County Population that hold Bachelors & Higher 2000 Pope 19.0% Washington 24.5% Pulaski 28.1% Clark 19.8% Benton 20.3% Faulkner 25.2% Craighead 20.9%

28 Percent of County Population (Associate Degree Holder) 2000 U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 50 th (4%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Associate Degree Holders

29 Where Arkansas Bachelors Degree (and higher) Holders live (2000) U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 51 st (16.7%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Bachelors & Higher 60% of all AR college graduates reside in 9 counties Pulaski 23.%

30 Where Arkansas Associate Degree Holders live (2000) U.S. Census Bureau Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) Arkansas ranked 50 th (4%) Nation-wide in 2000 for Associate Degree Holders 58% of all associates degree recipients reside in 12 counties

31 Strengthening the Arkansas Education Pipeline

32 Percent Arkansas 9 th Grader’s Progression into High School and College (percent) 100% 71% 28% Fall 2000 College Freshmen

33 96-97 Arkansas 9 th Grader’s Progression into High School and College (number) Fall 2000 College Freshmen 100% 71% 28%

34 % Needing Remediation Unduplicated Remediation Rates by County Fall 2007 First-time entering (full- and part-time) students seeking an associate or baccalaureate degree.

35 1.Strengthening the Arkansas Education Pipeline 2.Improving Preparation 3.Decreasing Remediation 4.Accessing Financial Aid 5.Increasing Retention and Graduation 6.Enhancing Funding and Governance 7.Addressing Data Needs 8.Supporting Economic Development 9.Issues for Further Study

36 Companies hope for boon in energy efficiency stimulus By Laurie Whalen, April 4 LITTLE ROCK -- Energy conservation and efficiency block grants. A $5 million grant program funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 will create work for Arkansas businesses and laborers specializing in energy conservation and efficiency services. Grants of $5,000 to $750,000 to help small cities and counties increase energy savings will be announced by summer. Call to ‘Buy American’ stirs clean-energy row Apri1 19, B Y KIM CHIPMAN BLOOMBERG NEWS

37 At the end of WWII, the U.S made a bold decision to invest in the future of its economy by providing $1.9 billion annually to the education of returning veterans of the war. This commitment to human capital helped enable the WWII generation to become the “greatest generation.” Possibly, Arkansas’s greatest generation is at the schoolhouse door waiting for the opportunity to propel Arkansas into the global economy.

38 Jim Purcell

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