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TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Brenda Stutsky RN, PhD www.stutsky.pbworks.com June 22, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Brenda Stutsky RN, PhD www.stutsky.pbworks.com June 22, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Brenda Stutsky RN, PhD June 22, 2010

2 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Outline Completion of Survey Online/Blended Learning Community of Inquiry Model Faculty/Our Survey Results Donna’s Questions

3 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Types of Learning Traditional Course –Face-to-face (f2f) –0% online Web Facilitated –may use CMS to post syllabus & assignments –1-29% online Blended/Hybrid –online & f2f –30 to 79% online Online –no f2f –80+% online Allen & Seaman (2008) Sloan Consortium Report

4 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE How Big is Online Learning Sample of 4,491 US institutions –2,577 responses Over 3.9 million students taking at least one online course in Fall % increase over 2006 Allen & Seaman (2008) Sloan Consortium Report

5 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Strategic Online education is critical to the long-term strategy of my institution? –Agree 58% –Neutral 27% –Disagree 15% Percent agreeing by type of program –Baccalureate 35.4% –Master’s 65.8% –Doctoral 54.8% Allen & Seaman (2008) Sloan Consortium Report

6 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Geographic Reach Primary reason for entering online education? –80% of master’s programs say to expand geographic reach 85% of all online students come from within 50 miles of campus Allen & Seaman (2008) Sloan Consortium Report

7 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Motivation for Teaching Online Because I am required to –61.6% not important It is the best way to reach particular students –38.9% important Meets students needs for flexible access –40.8% important Options: Not important, somewhat important, important, very important Allen & Seaman (2008) Sloan Consortium Report Convenience, convenience, convenience Charles Dzuiban (2009) Blended Learning Conference, Vancouver

8 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Blended Learning Definition: “Courses that integrate online with traditional face-to-face class activities in a planned, pedagogically valuable manner” Sloan Consortium (2005)

9 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Potential Potential to create communities of learners across time and space (engagement) Enhances student learning (effectiveness) Access, retention (convenience) Garrison (2009) Fourth International Blended Learning Conference, University of Hertfordshire

10 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Opportunity Opportunity to fundamentally redesign how we approach teaching and learning Garrison & Vaughan (2008) Transformative process directed toward improving the quality of the educational experience Garrison (2009) Fourth International Blended Learning Conference, University of Hertfordshire Shift to constructivism

11 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Constructivism Shift from teacher-directed to student-directed learning Passive to active learning Reigeluth (1999) Curriculum delivery is frequently the focus of concern in traditional face-to-face or online environments, while the development of a community, as a foundation for learning, is often ignored Lee (2006) Misapplication of learning approaches, such as implementing a behavioral approach as opposed to a constructivist approach to shape the development of a learning community remains an obstacle in online learning (Bolliger, 2006; Lee, 2006)

12 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Constructivism con’t Shifting paradigms is not always easy Educators & learners struggle with shift from traditional teaching Barker (2004) Learners need to be self-directed, self-disciplined, and have good time management skills (Barker; Kozlowski, 2004; Rovai, 2003) The conditions for learning are a social context where learners are viewed as autonomous, independent, self- motivating, engaging, and interactive individuals. (Ali et al., 2004; Almala, 2005; Bolliger, 2006; Cooperstein & Kocevar-Weidinger, 2004; Driscoll, 2005; Lee, 2006) Constructivist learning outcomes focus on reasoning, critical thinking, understanding and use of knowledge, self- regulation, and mindful reflection (Driscoll, 2005)

13 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Design No typical course design Not for specific courses or disciplines Large class –reduce lectures, increase engagement Small to medium –sustain engagement and collaboration Professional and continuing education –scheduling flexibility (convenience) share professional experience Garrison (2009) Fourth International Blended Learning Conference, University of Hertfordshire

14 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Value of a Framework Provides order and a means to understand complex educational activities Garrison (2009) Fourth International Blended Learning Conference, University of Hertfordshire Importance of community is a key factor in successful online/blended learning (Conrad, 2005; Haythornthwaite & Kazmer, 2004; Rovai, 2002; Shea, 2006; Shea, Li, & Pickett, 2006)

15 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Community of Inquiry Model Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000)

16 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Elements Social Presence –Acts as a support to cognitive presence Cognitive Presence –Ability to construct meaning Teaching Presence –Unifying element in the model –Necessary to shape a meaningful learning experience Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000)

17 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Blended Learning and CoI BL course had higher levels of all presences as well as perceived learning and satisfaction compared to a fully online course May suggest that the blended course format may have provided better conditions for higher-order thinking Akyol, Vaughan, and Garrison (in press)

18 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Overall Creating and sustaining a collaborative community of inquiry requires an understanding of the dynamics among and within the presences Akyol and Garrison (2008) Need to design courses with CoI in mind Need to follow basic principles of instructional design

19 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Survey Nursing Faculty Experience and Attitudes Toward Information Technology 2 Surveys –Stages of Adoption of Technology: Online Course Delivery –Faculty Attitudes Toward Information Technology

20 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Stage of Adoption Stage 1: Awareness (20.8%) Stage 2: Learning the process (8.3%) Stage 3: Understanding and application (4.2%) Stage 4: Familiarity and confidence (12.5%) Stage 5: Adaptation to other contexts (8.3%) Stage 6: Creative application to new contexts (0%) Missing: 45.8%

21 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Enjoy Lessons on the Computer Disagree (16.7%) Undecided (20.8%) Agree (54.2%) Strongly Agree (8.3%)

22 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Important to Learn to Teach Online Disagree (4.2%) Undecided (8.3%) Agree (58.3%) Strongly Agree (29.2%)

23 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Feel Comfortable Teaching Online Strongly Disagree (12.5%) Disagree (20.8%) Undecided (25.0%) Agree (29.2%) Strongly Agree (8.3%)

24 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Sinking Feeling When Think of Teaching Online Strongly Disagree (20.8%) Disagree (41.7%) Undecided (16.7%) Agree (16.7%) Strongly Agree (4.2%)

25 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Computers Isolate People by Inhibiting Normal Social Interactions Disagree (33.3%) Undecided (41.7%) Agree (20.8%) Strongly Agree (4.2%)

26 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Probably Never Learn to Teach Online Strongly Disagree (33.3%) Disagree (45.8%) Undecided (16.7%) Strongly Agree (4.2%)

27 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Online Learning Will Improve Education Disagree (16.7%) Undecided (25.0%) Agree (58.3%)

28 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Online Delivery Used with Courses that Demand Creative Activities Undecided (25.0%) Agree (66.7%) Strongly Agree (8.3%)

29 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Useful Instructional Aid in All Subject Areas Disagree (20.8%) Undecided (29.2%) Agree (50.0%)

30 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Almost Always Reduces Personal Treatment of Students Disagree (54.5%) Undecided (25.0%) Agree (20.8%)

31 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Effective Means of Disseminating Class Information & Assignments Undecided (4.2%) Agree (95.8%)

32 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Better Access to the Instructor Disagree (25.0%) Undecided (37.5%) Agree (37.5%)

33 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE More Interaction Between Students Strongly Agree (8.3%) Disagree (25.0%) Undecided (37.5%) Agree (29.2%)

34 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE More Interaction Between Student & Instructor Disagree (20.8%) Undecided (54.2%) Agree (25.0%)

35 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Increases Motivation for the Course Disagree (29.2%) Undecided (62.5%) Agree (8.3%)

36 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Course More Interesting Disagree (25.0%) Undecided (62.5%) Agree (12.5%)

37 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Student Feel More Involved Disagree (16.7%) Undecided (58.3%) Agree (20.8%) Strongly Agree (4.2%)

38 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Helps the Student Learn More Disagree (16.7%) Undecided (75.0%) Agree (8.3%)

39 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Helps to Provide a Better Learning Experience Disagree (29.2%) Undecided (62.5%) Agree (8.3%)

40 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE Donna’s Questions From the standpoint of child-bearing women, how would you rate the website? Why? From the standpoint of a nurse, how would you rate this website? Explain. Who would be excluded from this educational format? What other educational strategies could be used to target this group of women? How could web-based instruction be utilized as an educational strategy in your main project (an educational project proposal)?

41 TEACHING-LEARNING ONLINE That’s It


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