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Why PROPEL? It is an economic issue in that the earning power of high school dropouts is significantly below that of those who obtain higher education.

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Presentation on theme: "Why PROPEL? It is an economic issue in that the earning power of high school dropouts is significantly below that of those who obtain higher education."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Why PROPEL? It is an economic issue in that the earning power of high school dropouts is significantly below that of those who obtain higher education levels, and it is getting worse. It is an educational problem in that somehow we have not been able to meet the needs of students. It is a social problem in that the cost to society is increased.

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5 Forsyth vs. State Graduation

6 75 percent of state prison inmates and 59 percent of federal inmates are high-school dropouts. High-school dropouts are 3.5 times more likely than graduates to be incarcerated. Dropouts contribute disproportionately to the unemployment rate. In 2001, 55 percent of young adult dropouts were employed, compared to 74 percent of high-school graduates and 87 percent of college graduates. Dropouts contribute to state and federal tax coffers at about one-half the rate of high- school graduates. Over a working lifetime, a dropout will contribute about $60,000 less. The 23 million high-school dropouts aged will contribute roughly $50 billion less annually in state and federal taxes. Studies suggest the United States would save $41.8 billion in health care costs if the 600,000 young people who dropped out in 2004 were to complete one additional year of education. If 33 percent of dropouts graduated from high school, the federal government would save $10.8 billion each year in food stamps, housing assistance, and temporary assistance for needy families. Testifying before Congress, Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings said dropouts cost the United States "more than $260 billion... in lost wages, lost taxes and lost productivity over their lifetimes." By The Numbers

7 Clearing the Myths Students drop out mostly for social, family, or personal reasons that have little to do with school. Myth1 – Social Reasons Myth 1 – Social Reasons

8 Myth 2 - Predictability Dropping out is a sudden and often surprising event that can’t be predicted.

9 Myth 3 – The School’s Impact Dropping out is a personal decision that has nothing to do with how schools operate.

10 Myth 4: Engagement Students drop out because they are bored, not because they struggle academically.

11 Myth 5: Academic Prep If we just made sure all students were academically prepared to handle high school coursework, the dropout problem would go away.

12 Myth 6: Low Ambitions Students drop out because they have low ambitions.

13 What We Can Do Parents…Schools…Community We All Have a Hand!

14 Identify Students Early Examine Policies & Procedures Strong Community Partnerships Reduce Social Isolation Manage Student Transitions Options & Interventions Parent & Family Relationships


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