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Frogs in My Backyard - A Quick Reference Guide to the Most Common Frogs and Toads in Different Parts of Texas.

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Presentation on theme: "Frogs in My Backyard - A Quick Reference Guide to the Most Common Frogs and Toads in Different Parts of Texas."— Presentation transcript:

1 Frogs in My Backyard - A Quick Reference Guide to the Most Common Frogs and Toads in Different Parts of Texas

2 Texas – A Wonder World of Frogs  Texas has 42 different species of frogs and toads  Many counties in Texas may have more than 20 species  However, many of the sounds you hear at night are made by a handful of the most common frogs and toads.  Pick your region and start learning to recognize the night songs in your backyard!  P.S. If you’re lucky to live in some very special and unique habitats, such as the mountains of West Texas or the subtropics of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, then you’ll have some other unique species that are common in your area. Check out a field guide to see what “special” species you can expect!

3 West North Central Coastal South East Click on your region…

4 Common North Texas Species

5 2-5 inches in length Light stripe down back; elongate paratoid glands; warty skin Prefers sandy soils; uses many wetland types Breeds in spring and summer Call sounds like a sheep or “waaaah” Woodhouse’s Toad Anaxyrus (Bufo) woodhousii/velatus/fowleri complex

6 Cricket Frog Acris crepitans Small frog—about 1 inch in length Colors can vary; small warts on skin Found near permanent water Breeds in spring and summer Call sounds like marbles clicking together

7 Spotted Chorus Frog Pseudacris clarkii Small frog—about 1 inch in length Usually a pattern of greenish spots Found in small wetlands in grasslands Can breed all year, but peak in spring Call sounds like running your fingers along the teeth of a comb

8 Leopard Frogs Lithobates (Rana) berlandieri Rio Grande Leopard Frog Lithobates (Rana) sphenocephalus Southern Leopard Frog Lithobates (Rana) blairi Plains Leopard Frog Texas has three species of leopard frogs. All are spotted, with a dorso-lateral fold. All are found in permanent water bodies and may breed year-round. The calls are variable, with many different sounds, squeaks, and grunts.

9 Bullfrog Lithobates (Rana) catesbeianus Largest frog—4-6 inch body length Greenish-gray above; white below; prominent eardrum (tympanum) Found in large water bodies Breeds in spring, summer, fall Deep call sounds like blowing across the top of a bottle

10 Common East Texas Species

11 Cricket Frog Acris crepitans Small frog—about 1 inch in length Colors can vary; small warts on skin Found near permanent water Breeds in spring and summer Call sounds like marbles clicking together

12 Spring Peeper Pseudacris crucifer Small frog—1-2 inches long “X”-pattern on back; toe pads Found near small ponds in wooded areas Breeds in winter Call sounds like high-pitched whistle; groups calling sound like sleigh bells

13 Green Treefrog Hyla cinerea 1¼-2¼ inches long Bright green with distinct white line on side Found in moist wetland habitats—marshes, swamps, riparian areas Breeds primarily in spring and summer Call sounds like quacking of ducks or honking of geese

14 Bronze (Green) Frog Lithobates (Rana) clamitans Body length: 2-3 inches long Green to metallic bronze; fold of skin around eardrum Found in permanently wet habitats—streams, swamps, ponds Breeds in spring and summer Call sounds like plucking of banjo string

15 Southern Leopard Frog Lithobates (Rana) sphenocephalus Body length: 2-3½ inches long Spotted on back, with fold of skin down side of back Found in permanent water bodies Breeds year-round Variable call with grunts, squeaks and chucks— sounds like “Woody Woodpecker”

16 Bullfrog Lithobates (Rana) catesbeianus Largest frog—4-6 inch body length Greenish-gray above; white below; prominent eardrum (tympanum) Found in large water bodies Breeds in spring, summer, fall Deep call sounds like blowing across the top of a bottle

17 Common Coastal Texas Species

18 Gulf Coast Toad Ollotis nebulifer (Bufo valliceps) Body length: 2-4 inches long Prominent stripe on back and crests on head Found in a variety of habitats—urban and rural; permanent and temporary wetlands Breeds spring and summer Call is a long, low, rattling trill

19 Cricket Frog Acris crepitans Small frog—about 1 inch in length Colors can vary; small warts on skin Found near permanent water Breeds in spring and summer Call sounds like marbles clicking together

20 Green Treefrog Hyla cinerea 1¼-2¼ inches long Bright green with distinct white line on side Found in moist wetland habitats—marshes, swamps, riparian areas Breeds primarily in spring and summer Call sounds like quacking of ducks or honking of geese

21 Eastern Narrowmouth Toad Gastrophryne carolinensis Small frog—about 1 inch Oval shaped; dark above, light mottling below Usually found in recently-flooded wetlands Breeds late spring to summer, following rains Call is a loud, long bleat—like an air-horn

22 Southern Leopard Frog Lithobates (Rana) sphenocephalus Body length: 2-3½ inches long Spotted on back, with fold of skin down side of back Found in permanent water bodies Breeds year-round Variable call with grunts, squeaks and chucks— sounds like “Woody Woodpecker”

23 Bullfrog Lithobates (Rana) catesbeianus Largest frog—4-6 inch body length Greenish-gray above; white below; prominent eardrum (tympanum) Found in large water bodies Breeds in spring, summer, fall Deep call sounds like blowing across the top of a bottle

24 Common South Texas Species

25 Gulf Coast Toad Ollotis nebulifer (Bufo valliceps) Body length: 2-4 inches long Prominent stripe on back and crests on head Found in a variety of habitats—urban and rural; permanent and temporary wetlands Breeds spring and summer Call is a long, low, rattling trill

26 Texas Toad Anaxyrus (Bufo) speciosus Body length: 2-3¼ inches long Numerous warts; no prominent color markings Found in a grasslands and woodlands with sandy soil Breeds spring and summer Call is a repeated series of short, strong trills; sounds like a rivet-gun

27 Couch’s Spadefoot Toad Scaphiopus couchii Body length: 2¼-3½ inches long Mottled yellowish warty skin; prominent eyes; elliptical pupils Uses temporary wetlands in grasslands and savannah Breeds spring and summer only after heavy rains Call is a short, strained “waaaah”

28 Great Plains Narrowmouth Toad Gastrophryne olivacea Small frog—about 1 inch Oval shaped; smooth, grayish skin Usually found in recently-flooded wetlands; hides in burrows Breeds late spring to summer, following rains Call is a long, angry, insect-like buzz

29 Lithobates (Rana) berlandieri Rio Grande Leopard Frog Body length: 2-4 inches long Spotted on back; fold of skin down side of back is interrupted at the groin Found in permanent water bodies Breeds year-round Variable call is predominated by a low “growl”

30 Common Central Texas Species

31 Gulf Coast Toad Ollotis nebulifer (Bufo valliceps) Body length: 2-4 inches long Prominent stripe on back and crests on head Found in a variety of habitats—urban and rural; permanent and temporary wetlands Breeds spring and summer Call is a long, low, rattling trill

32 Cricket Frog Acris crepitans Small frog—about 1 inch in length Colors can vary; small warts on skin Found near permanent water Breeds in spring and summer Call sounds like marbles clicking together

33 Cliff Chirping Frog Eleutherodactylus (=Syrrhophus) marnockii Small frog—about 1 inch Mottled greenish skin; large head; small toe- pads Inhabits and breeds in rocky crevices Breeds year-round, with peaks in spring Frail call of chirps and short trills

34 Great Plains Narrowmouth Toad Gastrophryne olivacea Small frog—about 1 inch Oval shaped; smooth, grayish skin Usually found in recently-flooded wetlands; hides in burrows Breeds late spring to summer, following rains Call is a long, loud, insect-like buzz

35 Lithobates (Rana) berlandieri Rio Grande Leopard Frog Body length: 2-4 inches long Spotted on back; fold of skin down side of back is interrupted at the groin Found in permanent water bodies Breeds year-round Variable call is predominated by a low “growl”

36 Common West Texas Species

37 Red Spotted Toad Anaxyrus (Bufo) punctatus Body length: 1½-3 inches Round paratoid glands; red-spotted warts Often found in rocky areas and grasslands near water Breeds spring and summer following rain Call is a long, high, musical trill

38 Great Plains Toad Anaxyrus (Bufo) cognatus Body length: 2-4½ inches Dark spots edged in white; warty skin Found in a variety of arid habitats with loose soil Breeds spring and summer following rain Call is a very long, low, rattling trill

39 Spotted Chorus Frog Pseudacris clarkii Small frog—about 1 inch in length Usually a pattern of greenish spots Found in small wetlands in grasslands Can breed all year, but peak in spring Call sounds like running your fingers along the teeth of a comb

40 New Mexico Spadefoot Toad Spea multiplicata Body length: 1½-2½ inches long Orange or yellowish warts; prominent eyes; elliptical pupils Found in sandy soil areas; uses temporary wetlands to breed Breeds winter, spring, and summer only after heavy rains Call is a short, wooden rattle

41 Leopard Frogs Lithobates (Rana) berlandieri Rio Grande Leopard Frog Lithobates (Rana) blairi Plains Leopard Frog Texas has three species of leopard frogs, with two found in West Texas. Both are spotted, with a dorso-lateral fold. Both are found in permanent water bodies and may breed year-round. The calls are variable, with many different sounds, squeaks, and grunts; however, the Rio Grande Leopard Frog call is predominated by “growls” or “purrs.”

42 References:  


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