Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Journal Writing with Children Tonja L. Root, Ed.D. Early Childhood & Reading Education Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA 31698-0092

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Journal Writing with Children Tonja L. Root, Ed.D. Early Childhood & Reading Education Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA 31698-0092"— Presentation transcript:

1 Journal Writing with Children Tonja L. Root, Ed.D. Early Childhood & Reading Education Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA

2 Root, VSU2 Purposes for Journal Writing 4 Record experiences 4 Stimulate interest in a topic 4 Explore thinking 4 Personalize learning 4 Develop interpretations 4 Wonder, predict, hypothesize 4 Engage the imagination

3 Root, VSU3 Purposes for Journal Writing 4 Develop independent thinkers 4 Develop creative thinkers 4 Process for discovery & clarification of ideas 4 Build trust, acceptance, appreciation of different opinions 4 Learn that writing is thinking 4 Expose them to others' thinking

4 Root, VSU4 Types of Journals & Trade Books

5 Root, VSU5 Personal Journals 4 Students write about self- selected topics of personal interest.

6 Root, VSU6 Personal Journals 4 Private: Sharing journals is voluntary. or 4 Monitored: Teacher checks to ensure that entries have been made but does not read unless entries are marked, "Read me." or

7 Root, VSU7 Personal Journals (cont.) 4 Shared Journals: Teacher reads all entries except those marked "private," & offers encouragement & suggestions.

8 Root, VSU8 Trade Books: Personal Journals 4 Curtis, J.L. (1993). When I was little. New York: Scholastic. 4 Garrison, J., & Tubesing, A. (1996). A million visions of peace. New York: Scholastic. 4 Moss, M. (1995). Amelia’s notebook. Berkeley: Tricycle. 4 Moss, M. (1996). Amelia writes again. Berkeley: Tricycle.

9 Root, VSU9 Trade Books: Content of Personal Journals 4 Baer, E. (1990). This is the way we go to school: A book about children around the world. New York: Scholastic. 4 Cheltenham Elementary School kindergarteners. (1991). We are all alike…we are all different. New York: Scholastic.

10 Root, VSU10 Trade Books: Content of Personal Journals 4 Fox, M. (1997). Whoever you are. New York: Scholastic. 4 Katz, K. (1999). The colors of us. New York: Henry Holt. 4 Krensky, S. (1998). Arthur and the lost diary. New York: Little, Brown and Company.

11 Root, VSU11 Trade Books: Content of Personal Journals 4 dePaola, T. (1996). The baby sister. New York: Scholastic. 4 Rogers, J. (1993). Best friends sleep over. New York: Scholastic.

12 Root, VSU12

13 Root, VSU13

14 Root, VSU14

15 Root, VSU15 Your Turn 4 As an example of a personal journal entry, write a few sentences that you could share with students.

16 Root, VSU16 Home-School Connection Journals 4 Students take turns writing about school experiences, events, assignments, &/or programs. 4 Students take turns taking home the journal to share with family. 4 Family member(s) may respond in writing to the entry.

17 Root, VSU17 Home-School Connection Journals 4 A family member may write something about the child &/or the family, as appropriate. 4 Student returns the journal to school the next day for another student to take home.

18 Root, VSU18 Home-School Connection Journals 4 Entries may be shared with the entire class. Teacher may read the entry to the class (if the student is unable to).

19 Root, VSU19 Home-School Connection Journals 4 Serves as an alternative or supplement to a classroom newsletter. 4 Family members have an opportunity to view school from their child’s perspective & other children’s perspectives.

20 Root, VSU20 Home-School Connection Journals 4 Family has an opportunity to respond to whatever the child writes. 4 Suggestion: Have several circulating in the classroom simultaneously: Family could read an entry every week. 4 Entries do not need to be lengthy.

21 Root, VSU21 Trade Books: Content of Home- School Connection Journals 4 Fox, M. (1997). Whoever you are. New York: Scholastic. 4 Pelegrini, N. (1991). Families are different. New York: Scholastic.

22 Root, VSU22 Travel Journals 4 Students take turns taking home a bag that contains a stuffed animal, journal, travel brochures, crayons, markers, colored pencils, scissors, colored paper, glue, & other art supplies.

23 Root, VSU23 Travel Journals (cont.) 4 At home the child decides where the stuffed animal visits, writes a story about the visit, & illustrates the story using the art materials. 4 Student returns the journal to school the next day for another student to take home.

24 Root, VSU24 Travel Journals (cont.) 4 Entries may be shared with the entire class. 4 This would be an ideal way to inform family members of places nearby that could be visited on weekends.

25 Root, VSU25 Trade Books: Travel Journals 4 Krull, K. (1997). Wish you were here: Emily”s guide to the 50 states. New York: Doubleday. 4 Moss, M. (1997). Amelia hits the road. Berkeley: Tricycle. 4 McNally, R. (2000). Safari across America: A travel journal. New York: Rand McNally.

26 Root, VSU26 Your Turn 4 As an example of a travel journal entry, write a few sentences that you could share with students.

27 Root, VSU27 Simulated Journals 4 Students assume role of a historical personality or book character, & write entries from that person's viewpoint. 4 Entries are shared with classmates.

28 Root, VSU28 Trade Books: Simulated Journals 4 Waters, K. (1996). On the Mayflower: Voyage of the ship’s apprentice & a passenger girl. New York: Scholastic. 4 Blos, J. (1979). A gathering of days: A New England girl’s journal. New York: Scribner’s. 4 Moss, M. (1998). Rachel’s Journal: The story of a pioneer girl. New York: Scholastic.

29 Root, VSU29 Trade Books: Simulated Journals 4 Hopkinson, D. (1997). Birdie’s lighthouse. New York: Atheneum. 4 Bierman, C. (1998). Journey to Ellis Island. Toronto: Madison Press. 4 Moss, M. (2001). Rose’s Journal: The story of a girl in the Great Depression. New York: Scholastic.

30 Root, VSU30 Trade Books: Simulated Journals 4 Roop, P., & Roop, C. (1990). I, Columbus: My journal, New York: Walker. 4 Dyson, J. (1991). Westward with Columbus. New York: Scholastic. 4 Conrad, P. (1991). Pedro’s journal: A voyage with Christopher Columbus, August 3, 1492-February 14, New York: Scholastic.

31 Root, VSU31 Trade Books: Content of Simulated Journals 4 Waters, K. (1993). Samuel Eaton’s day: A day in the life of a Pilgrim boy. New York: Scholastic. 4 Waters, K. (1989). Sarah Morton’s day: A day in the life of a Pilgrim girl. New York: Scholastic. 4 Waters, K. (1996). Tapenum’s day: A Wampanoag Indian boy in pilgrim times. New York: Scholastic.

32 Root, VSU32 Learning Journals 4 Students write about content of subjects learned. 4 Young children may use both developmental spelling & words/sentences.

33 Root, VSU33 Trade Books: Learning Journals 4 Cole, S. (1999). Walking with dinosaurs: Photo journal. New York: Dorling Kindersley.

34 Root, VSU34 Professional Resource: Learning Journals 4 Popp, M.S. (1997). Learning journals in the k-8 classroom: Exploring ideas and information in the content areas. Mahway, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

35 Root, VSU35 Your Turn 4 As an example of a learning journal entry, write a few sentences that you could share with students.

36 Root, VSU36 Reading Journals 4 Students respond to stories, poems, informational books. 4 Entries may be shared with classmates.

37 Root, VSU37 Double-entry Reading Journals 4 A type of reading log. 4 Students write quotes from a story in left column. 4 They relate each quote to their own life & other literature read in the right column.

38 Root, VSU38 Dialogue Journals 4 Students write entries to share with teacher or classmate. 4 The receiver reads & responds. 4 Entries are written like a conversation.

39 Root, VSU39 Writing Notebooks 4 Students make notes & write lists of useful information about writing & other language arts in writing notebooks. 4 Students refer to information as needed.

40 Root, VSU40 Project Journals 4 Students record ongoing work on projects: planning, organizing, & accomplishments. 4 Teacher checks journals to determine progress.

41 Root, VSU41 Class Logs 4 Students take turns recording assignments, class notes, & other information from each class to file in a notebook. 4 Serves as a record of actual lessons.

42 Root, VSU42 Professional Resource: Journaling 4 Bromley, K. (1993). Journaling: Engagements in reading, writing, and thinking. New York: Scholastic. 4 Parsons, L. (2001). Response journals revisited: Maximizing learning through reading, writing, viewing, discussing, and thinking. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.

43 Root, VSU43 Professional Resource: Journaling 4 Popp, M. S. (1997). Learning journals in the K-8 classroom: Exploring ideas and information in the content areas. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

44 Root, VSU44 Journal Writing: Summary 4 There are many types of journals. 4 Purpose & variety are the key to a balanced writing program involving journal writing.

45 Root, VSU45


Download ppt "Journal Writing with Children Tonja L. Root, Ed.D. Early Childhood & Reading Education Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA 31698-0092"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google