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Writing Measurable, Clearly Defined, and Observable ANNUAL GOALS And Notable Changes to the New SOPM 2008-2009 IEP Specialists Brooklyn Integrated Service.

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Presentation on theme: "Writing Measurable, Clearly Defined, and Observable ANNUAL GOALS And Notable Changes to the New SOPM 2008-2009 IEP Specialists Brooklyn Integrated Service."— Presentation transcript:

1 Writing Measurable, Clearly Defined, and Observable ANNUAL GOALS And Notable Changes to the New SOPM 2008-2009 IEP Specialists Brooklyn Integrated Service Center

2 2 The IEP Specialists at the Brooklyn Integrated Service Center: Nicole Gourdine-Mew Stephanie Kavasansky Patricia Mills Verna Phillip-Yalley Angela McBride Nick Chavarria

3 3 An IEP needs to include goals in all areas of weakness or challenge for a child: True False

4 4 Standard Operating Procedures Manual (SOPM) Annual Goals: The IEP must include measurable annual goals consistent with the student’s needs and abilities. Annual goals are developed to address the individual student’s needs from the present levels of performance There must be a direct relationship between the annual goals and the present levels of performance Annual goals are statements, which emanate from the present levels of performance Annual goals, in measurable terms, describe a skill, knowledge or behavior that the student can reasonably be expected to accomplish within a twelve-month period. Annual goals may be academic, address social or behavioral needs, relate to physical needs or address other educational needs resulting from the student’s disability. Annual goals must be specific to and reflect the students’ needs as identified by the IEP Team.

5 5 Annual goals must be measurable, clearly defined, observable outcomes written to: Meet the needs that result from the student’s disability to enable the student to be involved and progress in the general education curriculum to the greatest extent appropriate Meet the student’s other educational needs that result from the disability Identify the instructional level at which the student will be working Be related to the educational standards or skills appropriate for the student given his/her current level of performance

6 6 The IEP annual goals do not list everything a student is expected to learn in a year and are not a substitute for the general education curriculum. The IEP therefore, is not intended to identify content area goals. Instead, annual goals are linked to the learning standards established for all students by reflecting the foundation skills (e.g. reading, writing, listening) and/or strategies the student requires to master the content of the curriculum and meet standards established for all students. They focus on offsetting or reducing the learning or behavioral problems resulting from the student’s disability so that the student can access and progress in the general education curriculum or alternate performance indicators. The IEP Team must also write goals that address the student’s individual needs, including needs not necessarily related to the general education curriculum such as behavior and transition, where appropriate. IEP Annual Goals

7 7 Annual Goals-SOPM The IEP must include measurable annual goals consistent with the student’s needs and abilities. Annual goals are developed to address the individual student’s needs from the present levels of performance There must be a direct relationship between the annual goals and the present levels of performance Annual goals are statements, which emanate from the present levels of performance Annual goals, in measurable terms, describe a skill, knowledge or behavior that the student can reasonably be expected to accomplish within a twelve-month period. Annual goals may be academic, address social or behavioral needs, relate to physical needs or address other educational needs resulting from the student’s disability. Annual goals must be specific to and reflect the students’ needs as identified by the IEP Team. Annual goals must be measurable, clearly defined, observable outcomes written to: Meet the needs that result from the student’s disability to enable the student to be involved and progress in the general education curriculum to the greatest extent appropriate Meet the student’s other educational needs that result from the disability Identify the instructional level at which the student will be working Be related to the educational standards or skills appropriate for the student given his/her current level of performance The IEP annual goals do not list everything a student is expected to learn in a year and are not a substitute for the general education curriculum. The IEP therefore, is not intended to identify content area goals. Instead, annual goals are linked to the learning standards established for all students by reflecting the foundation skills (e.g. reading, writing, listening) and/or strategies the student requires to master the content of the curriculum and meet standards established for all students. They focus on offsetting or reducing the learning or behavioral problems resulting from the student’s disability so that the student can access and progress in the general education curriculum or alternate performance indicators. The IEP Team must also write goals that address the student’s individual needs, including needs not necessarily related to the general education curriculum such as behavior and transition, where appropriate. NOTE: Question: Must the measurable goals be written for every area of the general education curriculum or only in those areas in which the student’s progress is affected by the student’s disability? Answer: The IEP Team should not include annual goals that relate to areas of the general education curriculum or school performance in which the student’s disability does not affect his/her ability to be involved and progress. (For detailed information, please refer to the Special Education - Standard Operating Procedure Manual (SOPM)-2008: Section 6 pages 106-107)

8 8 Why are Measurable Goals Important? Goals provide a roadmap for instruction and monitoring student progress They are required by Federal, New York State law and the New York City Department of Education If an IEP does not include them it is defective and open to a challenge that it denies FAPE Contributions by: Kathy Gomes, Regional SETRC PDS

9 99 Educational Benefit Educational Benefit Review Process is a process that will assist in examining & reflecting on the quality of IEP development to increase student access to, participation and progress in the general education curriculum by providing an appropriate education. Clarification: A properly written IEP provides the blueprint for teaching. It focuses upon the factors that tend to interfere with student achievement and utilizes students’ strengths to enhance learning. In order to bring this about, the IEP must link the assessment results to effective teaching strategies.

10 10 Educational Benefit and IEP Annual Goal Development Present Levels of Performance (PLOP) Annual Goals Plan and deliver instruction Measure progress (on-going assessment)

11 11 Present Levels of Performance Needs & Concerns Annual GoalsAccommodations & Modifications Services & Placement Progress Toward Goals Jose is a 9 th grade student whose writing skills demonstrate elementary sentence structure, lack of organization, and multiple errors in grammar and punctuation. Jose is slow to complete writing assignments and depends on others for assistance. Jose works well in small groups or with a partner… Jose’s writing skills demonstrate elementary sentence structure, lack of organization, and multiple errors in grammar and punctuation. Jose will write a complete paragraph with at least 5 complex sentences, using a minimum of 5-7 words per sentence, including content-related vocabulary, with accurate grammar and punctuation, in all academic areas. Jose will achieve this goal in 4 out of 5 trials as determined through a rubric, classroom tests and quizzes. Progress will be assessed over a two week period by the ELA teacher. Teacher-designed graphic organizer, a rubric or a checklist for self monitoring when writing. Whenever possible, Jose should participate in a small group for classroom activities. Reduction of task size, or extra time allocated, to accommodate slow processing in writing and math. Testing: Time and one-half 15:1 Speech 2X30-8:1 Will be noted on IEP page 6 progress report (Detailed Focused View)

12 12 Annual Goals: Some Suggestions Use language parents and educators can understand. Start with the Present Levels of Performance for baseline data. Be realistic, but aim high.

13 13 Frequently Asked Questions How many annual goals must be included in an IEP? This will depend on the needs identified in the student’s present levels of performance (IEP pages 3, 4 & 5). Must the measurable annual goals be written for every area of the general education curriculum or only in those areas in which the student’s progress is affected by the student’s disability? The IEP Team should not include annual goals that relate to areas of the general education curriculum or school performance in which the student’s disability does not affect his/her ability to be involved and progress. May staff members complete the IEP (in whole or part) before the IEP meeting? Staff members may bring draft recommendations and goals to a meeting. If these are brought to a meeting, participants must be informed that they are in draft form and are subject to review. Standard Operating Procedures Manual (SOPM)

14 14 Annual Goals enable the child to be involved in and progress in the general curriculum. > Identify skills crucial for learning the curriculum > Identify skills that meet other educational and developmental needs; e.g. Related Service goals >Goals do not equal curriculum. If they did, the list would be endless!

15 15 Basic Learning Skills/Needs Reading, Writing, Listening Decoding Comprehension Other…… Math Computation Problem Solving Other….. Communication Memory Determine which areas of need affect the student’s ability to succeed in the general education curriculum. Cognitive processing Study skills Organization Attention Social skills Community living skills Examples include, but are not limited to: Visual processing /perception Auditory processing /perception Motor skills Behavior

16 16 IMPORTANT: All student’s academic needs described in this section should be addressed on IEP page 6-annual goals. Include present levels of performance from related service providers (if applicable). Student’s STRENGTHS & needs should be described in this section. Describe the instructional implications of the testing results listed below (What do the testing results, listed in the section below, look like in classroom instruction?). Results of the assessments in this section should be described above (Scores recorded should be current – within 1 year) Indicate the instructional modifications and resources to enable the student to succeed (e.g. learning styles, visual aids, books on tape, manipulatives, etc.). What will the student need immediately for access to grade-level curriculum. What modifications, if any, are needed while remediation related to Annual Goals is taking place? Transition statements in the present levels of performance on this page must be used to develop transition plan goals on IEP page 10 JARGON- FREE _____ Results of the assessments in this section should be described above (Scores recorded should be current – within 1 year) There can be more than one IEP page three; e.g. 3a, 3b, 3c, etc.

17 17 Linking Annual Goals to Modifications and Accommodations Academic, Social/Emotional and Health/Physical Management Needs IEP Pages 3, 4 & 5 This section appears on the bottom of pages three, four and five of the IEP, and is critical for cohesively linking assessment results to effective teaching and classroom management practices on a daily basis, providing educational benefit. Indicate the instructional modifications and resources to enable the student to succeed, for example: visual aids learning styles (visual, audio, etc.) graphic organizers/lesson outlines Picture exchange communication system books on tape/peer reader manipulatives calculator (frequent) breaks time-out area checklists pencil grips shortened assignments content area pick lists simplify task directions multi-sensory approach token economy hands-on activities preferential seating

18 18 Annual Goal Activity Enjoy Spell orally List in writing Know Walk Understand Illustrate Grasp the meaning of Point to Read orally Write a paragraph Remember Realize Circle Be familiar with Count blocks Categorize Will you know it when you see it? Measurable & observable?.... Or Not? Place next to measurable & observable examples and X next to non measurable & non observable examples.

19 19 According to the New SOPM: Short-term objectives are no longer required for students who participate in City and State-wide testing. >IEPs will now have Annual Goals only >Only pre-school students and students who participate in New York State Alternate Assessment (NYSAA) will require short-term objectives Annual Goals must be directly related to the Present Levels of Performance Annual Goals must be measurable and observable

20 20 An Annual Goal Writing Template The following slides offer a useful method for writing Annual IEP Goals without short-term objectives. The method offers us an acronym that helps us ensure that we include all of the elements that are necessary for writing goals that guarantee educational benefit for students.

21 21 S.M.A.R.T Annual Goals Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. The main purpose is to ensure that all 5 elements are included in each annual goal. S – Specific: Describe what the student will one year from now that s/he cannot do today. M – Measurable: Describe the criteria that will be used to measure successful achievement of the goal. A – Achievable: Based on the student’s current level of performance, what is a reasonable and attainable higher level of performance that the student will achieve within one year? (What will you see happening a year from now that you don’t see happening at the present time, and what can the student reasonably be expected to be able to do in one year?) R – Relevant: Does the annual goal reflect individual needs identified in the Present Levels of Performance? How does the annual goal relate to the student’s classroom performance? (Annual goals emanate from the present levels of performance and must have a direct relationship with classroom performance). T – Time Related: Describe how long the goal will take to achieve, and embed the evaluation schedule

22 22 Annual Goal Sample: Reading Present Level of Performance: Sam is a 6 th grade student. He has difficulty decoding multi-syllabic words which interferes with his reading comprehension and fluency. Sam...... S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: In one year, Sam will decode multi-syllabic words containing prefixes, suffixes and the six syllable types. Sam will correctly decode 10 real and 10 nonsense words in 5 weekly consecutive trials, with no more than two errors per trial (90%). Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

23 23 Annual Goal Sample: Writing Present Level of Performance: Jose is a 10 th grade student whose writing skills demonstrate elementary sentence structure, lack of organization, and multiple errors in grammar and punctuation. Jose…... S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: In one year, using a teacher-made rubric, Jose will *write a complete paragraph with at least 5 complex sentences, using a minimum of 5-7 words per sentence, including content-related vocabulary, with accurate grammar and punctuation, in all academic areas. Jose will achieve this goal in 4 out of 5 trials as determined through classroom tests and quizzes, over a two week period by the ELA teacher. (*Described on a 6 th grade level) Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

24 24 Annual Goal Sample: Speaking & Transition Present Level of Performance: Angela has difficulty speaking in public. When asked to answer a question in class she is often reluctant stating that she fears she is incorrect. Angela… S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: Within one year, during a simulated job interview with a staff member or peer, Angela will be able to respond appropriately to ten questions used in interviews with 100% accuracy in 3 out of 4 trials as assessed by her teacher over four consecutive weeks through observations and recorded answers. Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

25 25 Annual Goal Present Level of Performance: Susan can solve one-step problems with the four basic arithmetic operations, but has difficulty recalling basic multiplication facts and following multi-step processes. Susan…. S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: Within one year, given a word problem requiring two basic arithmetic operations, Susan will determine the steps needed to solve the problem and will correctly complete the problem. Susan will demonstrate mastery by achieving 80% accuracy on 4 consecutive quizzes each containing 5 word problems over a 4 week time period. Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

26 26 Annual Goal Sample: Social/Emotional Present Level of Performance: Gary often attempts to distract his peers by making jokes, tries to initiate conversation, and looks for reasons to leave his desk. Gary…. S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: In one year, during small group instruction, given one teacher verbal prompt each instructional period, Gary will participate in instructional activities without distracting others, as observed and charted by the classroom teacher, recording time on task as evaluated over a 2 week period with no more than 3 infractions. Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

27 27 Annual Goal Sample: Organization Present Level of Performance: Dylan has difficulty organizing his work. He frequently loses assignments, does not keep track of when assignments are due and cannot locate materials needed to complete an assignment. Dylan… S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: Dylan will create and maintain a color-coded folder and an assignment sheet for each of five classes, for one year, to help him organize his papers and turn in assignments on time for 5 out of 5 classes as measured by a teacher made checklist, and teacher observation. Teacher will evaluate every 4 weeks. Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

28 28 Annual Goal Sample: Occupational Therapy Present Level of Performance: Thomas is an 8 year old boy who is currently attending a third grade CTT class. Although Thomas wears eye glasses throughout the day for nearsightedness, he does not demonstrate visual acuity concerns. Thomas' handwriting is legible and appropriate for his age. Thomas enjoys participating in journal writing. Adaptations have been implemented which include preferential seating in the classroom. When copying assignments from the chalkboard, Thomas often skips lines or demonstrates letter/word omissions. He is unable to align his writing within the margins. He requires visual cues to identify boundaries. Math assignments are also a challenge for Thomas due to difficulties with number alignment… S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: Within one year, using a handwriting program designed to reinforce alignment, boundaries and completeness of text and given a daily accuracy check, Thomas will copy assignments from the board to his notebook independently, accurately, within boundaries and properly aligned daily, without any omissions of words and within the time allotted by teacher. Progress will be measured over a two week period for 100% accuracy. Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

29 29 Annual Goal Sample: Transition Transition should be addressed in the IEP page 3-Present Levels of Performance, on IEP page 6-Annual Goals, and on IEP page 10-Transition for students 14 and older Indicate the student’s needs, preferences and interests, relating to the transition (age 14 and older) from school to post-secondary outcomes. On IEP Page 3: During the IEP conference, Steve expressed interest in working as a computer technician. S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: In one year, using a teacher made rubric, Steve will read and summarize 10 articles from computer trade magazines of his choice and/or from the internet with 80% accuracy each marking period. Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

30 30 Annual Goal Sample: Physical Therapy Present Level of Performance: Omar presents with weak muscles in his legs and trunk and uses a manual wheelchair as his primary means of getting around the school and community. Omar independently navigates through the classroom and school, using his manual wheelchair. He requires some assistance (contact guard) from an adult to transfer from his wheelchair to/from his classroom chair. In the classroom and during lunch, he is able to sit in his chair/wheelchair with a proper upright posture for no more than 10 minutes. He fatigues after 10 minutes and will assume a slouched sitting posture…. S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: Within one year, given ongoing focused exercises to maximize muscle tone, Omar will maintain an upright sitting posture (sit without slouching) in his wheelchair or classroom chair for 20 consecutive minutes during each period (8 out of 8 periods) throughout the school day. Omar will require no more than 2 verbal cues from his teacher or paraprofessional each period. Progress will be measured over a two week period for 80% posture maintenance as observation by provider. Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

31 31 How to Monitor Goal Progress Do what you committed to do when the goal was written. >Use the assessment process identified >Follow the evaluation schedule >Track the data Monitoring Reporting Report should be based on data collected Statements such as “student is doing well” are subjective and open to (mis)interpretation.

32 32 Progress Reports Page six has a dual function. Besides the expression of annual goals, page six provides us with a way to monitor a student’s progress. This information must be provided to parents, and shared with students (when appropriate). This information is also vary valuable to all the teachers that work with a student, especially when the student moves from one grade to the next.

33 33 See Progress key below # of Report cards PROGRESS KEY Annual Goals are statements which are created from the PRESENT LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE and in measurable terms, describe a skill, knowledge or behavior that the student can be reasonably expected to accomplish within one year. All Related Service Providers must collaborate & contribute functional goals Short term objectives (required for alternate assessment students only) are intermediate steps moving towards the achievement of their annual goals Goals relating to transition should address the educational instruction that will be provided to the student to achieve post-secondary goals & interests as indicated on IEP pages 3 &10 Progress reports are to be completed and sent home every marking period for every annual goal

34 34 Appendix This section contains activities for professional development events, as well as samples of annual goals that are aligned with present levels of performance. As you read the first four examples, try to use the SMART color code to identify the different elements of each goal. More color-coded examples follow.

35 35 Present Level of Performance: On the reading comprehension subtest, on which he was required to provide correct answers to questions related to a passage read silently, Gary demonstrated the ability to comprehend reading material on the fifth grade level. His weakness in organizing information appears to affect comprehension. His teacher reports that Gary struggles to understand content area reading assignments, and he takes a long time to complete tests. Annual Goal: In one year, using a sequential reading comprehension improvement program, and given a three-paragraph passage written on a sixth grade level, Gary will answer comprehension questions as measured by five consecutive weekly comprehension tests with 90% accuracy. Present Level of Performance: Carmen has decided to pursue a career in animal care. She wants to focus on becoming a veterinarian. Carmen’s writing lacks sentence structure and paragraph organizational skills. She writes in simple sentences and does not use details to support her ideas. …. Annual Goal: Within one year, Carmen will complete a journal by writing eight to ten sentences for each entry, including an opening topic sentence, supporting details, and a concluding sentence, reflecting information learned from viewing 20 documentaries or informational shows about animals, on television and/or the internet, related to animals and animal care professions. Progress will be evaluated monthly for 80% accuracy based on a teacher made rubric (one entry per documentary, two full entries per month). SAMPLE

36 36 Present Level of Performance: Crystal comprehends below her grade level and struggles with short term memory as evidenced by her inability to retain information from passages read. Crystal uses her computer to write email messages. Filling out forms, including job applications is a challenge. Crystal benefits from repeated instructions and demonstrations…… Annual Goal: Within one year, Crystal will be able to complete forms such as working papers, job applications, a learners permit, etc. with assistance accurately 4 out of 5 trials. Progress will be measured monthly by her teacher based on her portfolio and class activities. Present Level of Performance: Gerald is reading at the 6th grade level. His comprehension is stronger than his decoding skills. Gerald’s test performance has greatly improved on content area tests when they are read to him and when he has more time to complete them. Gerald seems to learn best when he listens to text or is shown examples….. Annual Goal: Within one year, when presented with chapter-long reading assignments in Science, Social Studies, English Language Arts and/or articles focused on his career choice of becoming a Sports Newscaster, Gerald will use SQR3 strategies (survey, question, read, recite, and review) to earn scores of at least 80% in 4 out of 5 quizzes/tests. Progress will be evaluated every 4 weeks by his teachers. SAMPLE

37 37 Sample Annual Goal – Writing ( Grammar and Spelling) Mahmud can write isolated paragraphs with topic sentences and supporting details. His writing is characterized by simple sentences and multiple punctuation and grammar errors. He has difficulty expanding on topics due challenges in sequencing his thoughts. S - Specific M - Measurable A - Achievable R - Relevant T – Time Related In one year, using a structured writing program with scaffolded lessons and an editing rubric, Mahmud will write a 5 paragraph essay with paragraphs containing correct punctuation, subject-verb agreement and complex sentences, as measured by 5 consecutive weekly trials with no more than 2 errors per trial.

38 38 Sample Annual Goal (Social Emotional) When confronted by new or challenging tasks, Lakshmi often lowers her head to the desk and refuses to engage in the assignment. When prompted by teachers or peers she often responds in a verbally abusive manner. S - Specific M - Measurable A - Achievable R - Relevant T – Time Related Within one year, given practice with conflict resolution strategies and given task segmentation (break down the task into small sequential pieces) by the teacher, Lakshmi will approach new academic tasks without lowering her head or becoming verbally abusive 100% of the time with no more than one teacher prompt, over a three consecutive week period.

39 39 Sample Annual Goal: Memory Alonso consistently completes writing tasks when teachers provide multiple prompts in order to guide him through the writing process. He demonstrates difficulty in following the multi-step directions that precede assignments. S - Specific M - Measurable A - Achievable R - Relevant T – Time Related Within one year, Alonso will employ mnemonics and check lists as memory improvement strategies to enhance his ability to follow multi-step directions independently. Alonso will be able to follow the multi-step directions necessary to complete essay writing assignments with no more than one verbal reminder, as measured by three assignments, over a six consecutive week period.

40 Annual Goal Sample: Coping skills Present Level of Performance: Yasmin has difficulty negotiating situations in which she is in conflict with her peers. Her inability to establish appropriate boundaries, and to respect the boundaries of others causes her to get into frequent verbal disputes with peers. She uses offensive and threatening language during her disputes. S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related Annual Goal: Within four months, given conflict resolution strategies, and the opportunity to role-play in counseling sessions, Yasmin will state verbally to a peer when she feels that she has been disrespected or her personal space has been invaded, using appropriate, inoffensive words, in 4 out of 5 situations as assessed both in class and in unstructured setting by any of her teachers over two consecutive weeks through observations. Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.

41 41 Activity Writing Management Strategies and Annual Goals Now you have an understanding of the basics: The Present Levels of Performance generate management strategies and annual goals. In your groups you will: 1.Receive and read a part of Gary’s Present Level’s of Performance. 2.Write academic, social or health management strategies. 3.Write a SMART annual goal (including transition, if you get that piece). 4.Share your work with the larger group.

42 42 Present Levels of Performance Example 1: (Gary is an eighth grader.) On the calculation subtest, Gary demonstrated mastery of addition and subtraction of four digit numbers, with regrouping. He has mastered the 2, 3, 5 and 10 multiplication tables for single digits. He struggles with long division, which affects his ability to solve algebraic equations. Test results show that Gary has trouble with sequential memory. This affects his ability to easily recall basic math facts, and slows down his completion of assignments.

43 43 Present Levels of Performance Example 2: On the reading comprehension subtest, on which he was required to provide correct answers to questions related to a passage read silently, Gary demonstrated the ability to comprehend reading material on the fifth grade level. His weakness in organizing information appears to affect comprehension. His teacher reports that Gary struggles to understand content area reading assignments, and he takes a long time to complete tests.

44 44 Present Levels of Performance Example 3: Gary’s frustration with his difficulties in reading comprehension interferes with his ability to stay engaged during silent reading assignments in the classroom, and when his peers are responding to teacher questions related to reading material. He often attempts to distract his peers by making jokes, tries to initiate conversation, and looks for reasons to leave his desk. His behaviors escalate when rebuffed by his peers.

45 45 Present Levels of Performance Parental and student input helps to identify student strengths, interests and preferences. Example 4: Gary’s parents report that he enjoys building models and helping his father with home maintenance. Gary stated that he likes playing action video games. He says that he learns best when doing things with his hands. Gary says that he wants to learn how to build and fix computers as a possible career.* * This is an example of a transition statement, required on IEPs for students 14 and older. Gary will turn 15 during this school year.

46 46 Present Levels of Performance It is important to include information about which teaching and learning strategies have been successful with Gary and which ones have not. Example 5: Teachers report that Gary does not respond well to independent class activities. He does not like to work alone. He operates best during small group activities in which he has opportunities to share information with and learn from his peers.

47 47 Tools for Progress Reporting Computerized Charting & Graphing  Microsoft Office charting tools  Chart dog (www.interventioncentral.org)www.interventioncentral.org  Behavior Reporter: Behavior Report Card Generator (www.interventioncentral.org)www.interventioncentral.org Photocopier  Provide copies of data charts (preferably with a written explanation)

48 48 For More Information Contact your ISC support staff Link to downloadable SOPM: >http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/F1AD5E08-62A0-408A- 9187-BB757C9556BA/0/SOPM.pdf Link to all special education documents: >http://schools.nyc.gov/Academics/SpecialEducation/ EducatorResources/default.htm

49 49 References Standard Operating Procedures Manual: The Referral, Evaluation and Placement of School – Age Students with Disabilities. September 2008. NYCDOE Office of Special Education Initiatives. NYCDOE Brooklyn Integrated Service Center Special Education Department. Creating A Quality IEP: Individualized Education Program Manual. January 2005, NYCDOE Office of Special Education Initiatives. Annual Goals Presentation. 2005, NYC SETRC.


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