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Introductory Task 1. What term means a belief in the importance of traditional values and competition? 2. What term means the idea that human behaviour.

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Presentation on theme: "Introductory Task 1. What term means a belief in the importance of traditional values and competition? 2. What term means the idea that human behaviour."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introductory Task 1. What term means a belief in the importance of traditional values and competition? 2. What term means the idea that human behaviour is governed by the economy? 3. What name is give to a very traditional form of Conservatism? 4. What do we call learning that is formal or informal? 5. What schools teach traditional subjects? 6. What schools teach children of all abilities? 7. What term means every person has the same chance? Equality 8. Which instruction told all education authorities to go comprehensive? (4 minutes)

2 Introductory Task 1. What term means a belief in the importance of traditional values and competition? Conservatism 2. What term means the idea that human behaviour is governed by the economy? Market forces 3. What name is give to a very traditional form of Conservatism? New Right 4. What do we call learning that is formal or informal? Education 5. What schools teach traditional subjects? Grammar Schools 6. What schools teach children of all abilities? Comprehensive schools 7. What term means every person has the same chance? Equality 8. Which government instruction told all education authorities to go comprehensive? Circular 10/65

3 Important Research Study McKnight et al (2005) Investigated New Labour policies effect on education Used Secondary sources in the form of Official Statistics on Key Stages tests and GCSE results Findings showed how performance in schools had improved under Labour Government. Also gap between rich and poor had narrowed – although it was still very wide. How can we evaluate this study ?

4 Clues for AO2 Educational change may take place for the following reasons: Ideology Ideology Economics Economics Practical reasons Practical reasons Political reasons Political reasons Think about how you could use those ideas in your short account. Think about how you could use those ideas in your short account.

5 Its never too soon to start revising.

6 Understanding how British society plans and organises the education of young people PowerPoint 2

7 Thinking for yourself What is the most important thing that you have ever learned? Where and how did you learn it? Why was it important to you to know this thing? Now discuss this with your study partners (3 minutes)

8 Sociological Targets You will understand that the school system in the UK is complex and variable. You will recognise that this difference in school provision can have an impact on the education of children. You will understand the form of the UK education system and recognise some of the factors that have shaped it.

9 Websites to support your learning www.dfes.gov.uk/ This is the website of the Department for Education and Skills. Lots of official data and government information is available, as well as policy documents and links to other official sties news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education This is the BBC site and is of course, excellent for current stories and background information. http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/ Education-line is an academic site with research papers and links. www.tes.co.uk This is the teaching newspaper. You can see in the LRC, but the site is useful because there are discussion forums and news articles about education in Britain. See what teachers say to each when pupils are not about! www.atss.org.uk Use any of the sites recommended by the Association for the Teaching of Social Sciences. They really are all very good.

10 Idea for independent study Find out about the education system in a country from anywhere in the world. Here are ideas for questions to ask: At what age do children start school? What subjects do they learn? Do they pay for education? What is the relationship between teachers and students? What other questions could you ask? Suggest different ways of discovering some of this information. (3 minutes)

11 Compulsory Education All children will be educated between the ages of 5 and 16. This may be at home, but home can be inspected. The content of the education is regulated by the National Curriculum Education is freely provided by the state between the ages of 5 and 19. Local education authorities have a duty to educate all children If children are excluded from school then the education authority must make alternative provision

12 The State Education system 19 - Tertiary Education in a University or further education institution leading to higher level qualifications 16 – 19 optional Secondary education in a variety of types of schools or sixth form colleges 10 ½ – 16 compuls ory Secondary education in a variety of types of schools e.g. Academies, comprehensives, grammar schools etc 4 – 10 ½ years compuls ory Primary education in local primary schools There is also a system that is separate from the State known as the independent sector. It caters for between 6% and 10% of children; generally from wealthy backgrounds

13 What types of schools are there? Schools are funded with public and private money. Some schools are controlled by local authorities but others are controlled by businesses or charities http://www.etoncollege.com/Home.aspx http://www.qas.org.uk/Fees/index.php There are many different forms of school Draw a pictorial reminder of the different types using your booklets. Dont forget the independent schools !

14 Community Schools Community schools are owned by local authorities who allocate money and employ staff. This is probably the most common type of school. These include grammar schools, comprehensive schools, and secondary modern schools. In Wales, you will also find community schools that teach through the medium of the Welsh language. What are the strengths and weaknesses of such a system?

15 Foundation Schools Foundation schools have more freedom than community schools because the governing body can select pupils and employ staff. These schools may include comprehensives and grammar schools. What are the strengths and weaknesses of such a system?

16 Voluntary aided and faith schools Voluntary-aided schools are owned by charities and they employ staff. They may be religious faith schools. City Technology Colleges are independent from Local Authorities, but do not charge fees. They tend to offer vocational qualifications. What are the strengths and weaknesses of such a system?

17 City Academies City Academies that are independent from local authorities and many are funded by businesses or charities. Large numbers are linked to religious groups. They were often set up on the sites of failing schools and many offer vocational education. They have been controversial What are the strengths and weaknesses of such a system?

18 Specialist schools Specialist schools have extra funding to establish a centre of excellence in certain subject areas, although they must teach the whole curriculum. There are over 2,600 such schools in England. What are the strengths and weaknesses of such a system?

19 Summary of key points Schools are funded with public and private money. Some schools are controlled by local authorities but others are controlled by businesses or charities There are many different forms of school

20 Individual Research Find out more about the independent sector of education through using websites. Discussion work with study partners and others: Should parents be able to pay to get better education for their children than others can afford? Summarise points for and against independent sector education.


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