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Why Take EXPLORE? EXPLORE shows your strengths and weaknesses in English, mathematics, reading, and science. EXPLORE helps you search for careers and.

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Presentation on theme: "Why Take EXPLORE? EXPLORE shows your strengths and weaknesses in English, mathematics, reading, and science. EXPLORE helps you search for careers and."— Presentation transcript:

0 Visual 1: Points of Emphasis Welcome! This session is designed to help you understand what the EXPLORE Student Score Report can tell you about your skills, interests, college readiness, plans, and goals. It will also explain how this information can be used to develop effective educational and career plans for high school and beyond. One of the keys to ensuring that you are prepared for high school (and eventually for college) is getting an early start to the planning process. Even before high school starts (or very early in your high school career) EXPLORE helps you: know if you’re on track to be college ready choose high school begin career planning. Early awareness of academic strengths and weaknesses, plus a rigorous high school course plan, are the keys to success.

1 Why Take EXPLORE? EXPLORE shows your strengths and weaknesses in English, mathematics, reading, and science. EXPLORE helps you search for careers and learn which ones might be right for you. EXPLORE helps you choose high school courses that will prepare you for college and work. Visual 2: Points of Emphasis There are many benefits to taking EXPLORE: EXPLORE shows you your academic strengths and weaknesses. This way, you will know which courses will be best to take to improve your skills or show you where you might want to get some extra help. EXPLORE is a great career exploration tool. EXPLORE not only helps you learn about more than 500 occupations, it can show you which of them are most likely to interest you. Every student should have the choice about whether or not they wish to go to college. Students who are not prepared are not likely to be successful in college. EXPLORE helps you build a high school plan that will ensure you are taking the challenging coursework you’ll need to be prepared for college-level work. EXPLORE includes College Readiness Benchmark Scores that show you whether or not you are on target to be ready for college-level coursework. If you score at or above the benchmarks, you are likely on target for college. If you score below the benchmarks, you still have time to improve in those areas if you take the right classes and work hard in them.

2 Using Your EXPLORE Results Student Guide to EXPLORE
Visual 3: Points of Emphasis You will receive a copy of Using Your EXPLORE Results, a booklet designed to help you understand your EXPLORE Score Report. This booklet walks you through the Student Report section by section. Using Your EXPLORE Results also includes a Coursework Planner that can help you plan your high school courses and show you how those courses are important to different careers. You should also make sure that your parents read the booklet as well. Along with your counselor, they can help you understand your EXPLORE results. Using Your EXPLORE Results is also available in Spanish.

3 Student Score Report What is the Student Score Report? This individualized report details scores received on the assessment and the career plans and needs indicated by the student. What does the Student Score Report provide? Suggestions for improving student academic skills Careers that match student interests Indicators of college readiness Visual 4; This part is individualized just for you.

4 EXPLORE Score Report Side 1
Visual 5: Points of Emphasis Here you see the front side of a sample Student Score Report. The Score Report includes a great deal of information about your skills and knowledge, academic plans for high school and beyond, career interests, and likely readiness for college. The Score Report has been designed for use as a tool to help you improve your academic skills and knowledge, make educational plans, and investigate careers. The more thoroughly the Score Report is used, the more you will likely benefit from EXPLORE. In the next few slides, we will take a closer look at each of the sections on the EXPLORE Score Report.

5 Student/School Information
Visual 6: Points of Emphasis The top of the Score Report includes basic information about you, including: Your school School EXPLORE code Your grade level Date the test was administered The school receives 2 copies of every student’s report: 1 copy for school records, 1 copy for you to share at home.

6 Your Scores Visual 7: Points of Emphasis
On the left side of the graphic, you will find several scores that indicate how well you did on EXPLORE. You will see scores for English, mathematics, reading, science, as well as your Composite Score. Each of these scores will range from 1–25. The Composite Score is the average of your English, mathematics, reading, and science scores. Notice there are 2 subscores under English. These scores may indicate specific areas in English that need improvement. These scores range from 1–12. The horizontal bars are simply another way to show the percentage of students at or below your scores. The farther to the right the bar extends, the greater the number of students who scored at or below your score. The column titled “In the U.S. Fall 8th” shows the percentage of students in a national norm group that scored at or below your score. In this example, this student scored as high or higher than 61% of students in the national norm group of 8th graders who took EXPLORE in the fall. “In Your State” norms are only provided when specified by a state contract. Do not be concerned if you do not see numbers in these columns.

7 Your Estimated PLAN® Composite Score Range
Visual 8: Points of Emphasis EXPLORE is one of three assessments that measure your readiness for college. PLAN ® is a test usually taken in 10th grade, and the ACT® is usually taken in 11th or 12th grade. All three tests cover the same four subject areas (English, math, reading, and science). Used together, EXPLORE, PLAN, and the ACT can show you how your skills and knowledge grow over time. When you take EXPLORE you will receive an estimated PLAN Composite Score Range. The Estimated PLAN Composite Score Range tells you how other students scored on PLAN as 10th graders after achieving the same Composite Score as you received on EXPLORE. Based on your EXPLORE scores, it is likely that when you take PLAN, your score will be in this range. You may score higher if you improve your study skills and/or take challenging courses. Remember, this is not a guarantee. It is an estimate of your performance on PLAN based on your EXPLORE scores and assumes you will continue your current level of commitment to your coursework.

8 Your High School Course Plans Compared to Core
Visual 9: Points of Emphasis This section compares your plans for high school coursework to a recommended “Core” set of courses that are important to take in order to prepare yourself for college. ACT defines Core as: 4 years of English 3 or more years of math 3 or more years of social studies 3 or more years of science Is the student in this example meeting Core? Students who take this recommended Core set of courses tend to be much better prepared for college-level work than students who do not. You should plan to take additional coursework in the appropriate subject areas if your plans fall short of Core. Taking additional courses beyond the Core, especially upper-level math and science courses, makes it even more likely that you will be ready for college.

9 Areas in Which You Would Like Additional Help
Visual 10: Points of Emphasis When you took EXPLORE, you were asked whether or not you needed help in seven different areas: Making plans for my education, career, and work after high school Improving my writing skills Improving my reading speed and comprehension Improving my study skills Improving my mathematical skills Improving my computer skills Improving my public speaking skills The items marked with a checkmark are the areas with which you said you would like help. Talk with your counselors/teachers on how to receive additional help. Teachers/Counselors: Be sure to let students know how they can receive help at your school.

10 Your Plans for After High School
Visual 11: Points of Emphasis When you completed EXPLORE, you were asked to consider your future educational and career plans. As you explore occupations within the Career Area you said you preferred, think about whether or not the Educational Plans you indicated are consistent with the educational preparation required for jobs that interest you. For instance, if you are interested in being a high school classroom teacher, you will most likely need to complete a four-year bachelor’s degree. You can find out more about educational preparation required for specific jobs at Click on the link for the World-of-Work Map at the bottom of the page to begin exploring careers. You can also visit to access the Occupational Outlook Handbook, a resource that describes jobs and the outlook for job openings.

11 College Readiness Visual 12: Points of Emphasis
Your EXPLORE results give you an early indication of how likely you are to be ready for college-level work. While you have quite a bit of time before you will need to take college courses, the time to begin preparing for them is now. EXPLORE uses ACT’s College Readiness Benchmark Scores to indicate whether or not you are on target to develop the skills and knowledge you need to be ready for college. The best way to get the skills you need is to take challenging, rigorous courses in high school. This section shows whether you scored above, at, or below EXPLORE College Readiness Benchmark Scores for English, mathematics, reading, and science. Students who meet the Benchmark Scores in English, mathematics, and science are likely on target for success in entry-level college courses in these subjects. Students meeting the Reading Benchmark Score are likely developing the reading skills needed in all college subject areas. Are your scores at or above the Benchmarks? If so, keep working hard. This just means you are on target for success if you maintain your current focus. You will need to keep working hard to stay on track. Are your scores below the Benchmarks? There is still plenty of time to build your skills. Make sure you are meeting the recommended Core courses needed for college success. The information in the Your Skills section of the Score report can also help you. You may want to focus your attention on taking more courses in areas where you are not currently meeting Benchmark scores.

12 Your Career Possibilities
Visual 13: Points of Emphasis EXPLORE is a great tool for helping you explore the many different career possibilities available. Use your EXPLORE Score Report, Using Your EXPLORE Results booklet, and the EXPLORE student website (www.explorestudent.org) to help you learn more about careers in line with your interests. When you took EXPLORE, you were asked questions about the types of work tasks you liked and disliked. Based on your answers, EXPLORE can tell you about jobs that may be appealing to you. The results can be found on the World-of-Work Map on your Score Report. Career Areas (each marked with a different letter) that are in line with your interests can be found in the blue shaded areas. See Using Your EXPLORE Results and to find activities that will help you learn more about jobs that fall under these Career Areas.

13 EXPLORE Score Report Side 2
Visual 14: Points of Emphasis On Side 2 of your EXPLORE Score Report you will find important information about how you can improve your academic skills based on your EXPLORE results. Use this information to identify academic skill areas you can continue to improve upon. Earlier, we talked about the importance of making high school course plans that will help you develop the skills you need for college-level courses. Your EXPLORE Score Report can give you specific suggestions on how you can improve your skills.

14 Review Your Answers Visual 15: Points of Emphasis
On the left side of page 2 of your Student Report, you will find a list of your responses to each of the EXPLORE test questions that were on the test. You will find a list for each of the four areas of EXPLORE (English, mathematics, reading, and science) For each test question, the correct answer is shown along with your response to the question and the subscore group the question came from. (Was it a question about Algebra? Rhetorical Skills?) At the bottom of each list is a short summary of the number of questions you answered correctly, the number you answered incorrectly, and the number you did not answer (omitted). Hopefully, you did not omit any questions. There is no penalty for guessing on EXPLORE. Your teacher or counselor may want to give you the EXPLORE test booklet so that you can see the questions themselves as you look over each list of responses. This will help you see which areas you need to work on most.

15 Review Your Answers 15 9/2010 4/6/2017 Visual 15: Points of Emphasis
On the left side of page 2 of your Student Report, you will find a list of your responses to each of the EXPLORE test questions that were on the test. You will find a list for each of the four areas of EXPLORE (English, mathematics, reading, and science) For each test question, the correct answer is shown along with your response to the question and the subscore group the question came from. (Was it a question about Algebra? Rhetorical Skills?) At the bottom of each list is a short summary of the number of questions you answered correctly, the number you answered incorrectly, and the number you did not answer (omitted). Hopefully, you did not omit any questions. There is no penalty for guessing on EXPLORE. Your teacher or counselor may want to give you the EXPLORE test booklet so that you can see the questions themselves as you look over each list of responses. This will help you see which areas you need to work on most. 15 9/2010 15

16 Your Skills Visual 16: Points of Emphasis
On Side 2 of your Student Report you will find information that you can use to improve your skills in each of the areas tested by EXPLORE (English, mathematics, reading, and science). Notice that each suggestion corresponds to specific content areas. For instance, in English, you will find suggestions for how to improve your skills in Organization, Word Choice, and other important areas in English. The suggestions you find on your Score Report will most likely be different from those for other students in your class who took EXPLORE, because they are based specifically on your EXPLORE scores.

17 www.explorestudent.org Visual 17: Points of Emphasis
ACT has developed a website designed to help students and parents understand and use EXPLORE results. At you can: Learn what your EXPLORE scores mean Learn how to improve your skills Learn how EXPLORE can help you see if you are on target for college Use online career exploration tools Find sample EXPLORE test questions

18 Coursework Planner Visual 18: Points of Emphasis
In the Using Your EXPLORE Results interpretive guide, you will find a Coursework Planner (page 13) that is designed to help you think about the courses you should take in high school. Using the Coursework Planner, you can see how the subjects you take in high school are related to specific Career Areas that you will find on the World-of-Work Map. It helps you keep your career preferences in mind as you plan your courses. It will also help you make sure you are taking challenging, college prep courses as part of your plans. Remember, the more challenging the courses you take, the more likely you will be ready for college-level work once you graduate high school.

19 What Do I Do Now? When using your Score Report, ask yourself some questions: Does my high school course plan include challenging college prep courses? What skills do I need to work on to be sure I am on target for college? How can I learn more about careers that interest me? Visual 19: Points of Emphasis Taking EXPLORE has many benefits, but in order to get the most from EXPLORE you need to take advantage of the information from your Score Report, the Using Your EXPLORE Results booklet, and the EXPLORE student website (www.explorestudent.org). If you find that you are not on target for college, ask your teachers and/or counselor how you can improve your skills. You can begin by looking at the Your Skills section on side 2 of the Score Report. In many cases, you may need to take additional courses or change the types of courses you plan to take in high school in order to improve your skills. The more challenging the courses you take, the more likely it is that you will develop the skills you need. Be sure to share the information with your parents and ask your teachers and school counselors questions about sections of the report that you do not understand.

20 Study Skills Checklist for Students
Set a regular time and place to study each day and throughout the week. Keep a daily “to do” list. Set goals for yourself. Do your reading assignments before the material is discussed in class. Pay close attention and take good notes in class. Prepare for tests during your regular study times instead of cramming at the last minute. Visual 20: Points of Emphasis Good study skills are important for success in all of your courses, now and in the future. As we have discussed throughout this session, taking challenging courses is important for college readiness. Just as important, though, is that you do your best to be successful in all of the courses you take. Teachers/Counselors: Reinforce the importance of these and other good study habits.

21 Keys to Good Educational and Career Planning
Take challenging college prep courses in high school. Explore the many career options available and think about how your career choices will affect your future. Set career goals and develop an educational plan to achieve them. Visual 21: Points of Emphasis Teachers/Counselors: You may want to use a review of these Keys as a good way to wrap up the session. You may want to use examples of successful community leaders, parents, or recent high school graduates to emphasize these points. You may also want to use this opportunity to remind students/parents of the resources your school has available to help families with educational, career, and college planning.


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